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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

ANNUAL 
TOWN REPORT 




CHELMSFORD 

1983 



IN MEMORIAM 



ARTHUR A. COOKE 

Police Chief 1936 - 1941 

Highway Department 1953 - 1954 

Welfare Director 1954 - 1966 

Council on Aging 1979-1983 

HAROLD M. TUCKE 

Wiring Inspector 1958 - 1979 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 



Town of Chelmsford 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 



1983 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Incorporated 

Type of Government 
Location 



County 

Land Area: 

Population, 1983: 

Assessed Valuation 1983 

Tax Rate: 

United States Senators in Congress: 

5th Congressional District 

State Senator 

Representative in General Court: 

16th Middlesex District 

Accounting Department 

Assessors Office 

Board of Health 

Highway Department 

Office 

Garage 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library 

Children's House 

McKay Library 

School Superintendent 

Selectmen's Office 

Town Clerk 

Tax Collector & Treasurer 

Veterans Agent 



May, 1655 

Town Meeting 

Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and 

Tyngsboro on the North, Billerica on the East, 

Carlisle on the South, and Westford on the West. It 

is 24 miles from Boston, 40 miles from Worcester, 

and 225 miles from New York City. 

Middlesex 

22.54 Square Miles 

31,247 

S812,528,705 (Real Estate) 

$ 25,165,440 (Personal Property) 

$20.50 

James M. Shannon, Lawrence 
Carol C. Amick, Bedford 

Bruce N. Freeman, Chelmsford 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June. July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 



Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Closed Monday 

Tuesday thru Thursday 9:00 a.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Friday and Saturday 9:00 a.m. -6:00 p.m. 

Monday, Wed. and Friday . . 10:00 a.m. -6:00 p.m. 

Tuesday and Thursday 2:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

Saturday 10:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday. Tuesday and Thursday .... 1 p.m. -8 p.m. 
Closed Wednesday and Friday 

Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June. July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

MEETINGS 



Annual Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Selectmen 
School Committee 
Planning Board 
Appeals Board 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Housing Authority 



First Saturday in April 

Last Monday in April 

Every other Monday 7:30 p.m. 

Every other Tuesday 8:00 p.m. 

7:30 p.m. -2nd & 4th Wed. every month 

7:30 p.m. -4th Thursday every month 

8:00 p.m. -1st & 3rd Tues. every month 

7:30 p.m. -2nd & 4th Mon. every month 

7:30 p.m. -1st Tuesday every month 



12 Precincts 
McCarthy Jr. High 
Town Offices 
High School 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
10 Wilson Street 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Moderator 

Dennis E. McHugh 
(Term Expires 1984) 

Town Clerk 

Mary E. St.Hilaire 

(Term Expires 1984) 



Board of Selectmen 
Claude A. Harvey Term Expires 1984 

Bonita A. Towle Term Expires 1985 

Bradford O . Emerson Term Expires 1 985 

Paul C. Hart Term Expires 1986 

DennisJ. Ready Term Expires 1986 

Treasurer & Tax Collector 

James R. Doukszewicz Term Expires 1984 



Board of Assessors 



Janet Lombard 
James H. McBride 
Ruth K. Delaney 



Term Expires 1 984 
Term Expires 1 985 
Term Expires 1986 



Cemetery Commissioners 
Charlotte DeWolf Term Expires 1 984 

Everett V. Olsen Term Expires 1985 

Gerald L. Hardy Term Expires 1 986 

Chelmsford Housing Authority 

Ruth K. Delaney Term Expires 1985 

William P. Keohane Term Expires 1986 

Claude A. Harvey Term Expires 1987 

Robert L. Hughes Term Expires 1 988 

Pamela Turnbull Term Expires 1988 



Board of Health 



Peter Dulchinos 
Paul F. McCarthy 
PaulJ. Canniff 



Term Expires 1984 
Term Expires 1985 
Term Expires 1986 



Park Commissioners 

Arthur L. Bennett Term Expires 1984 

Robert L. Wetmore Term Expires 1 985 

Eileen Duffy Term Expires 1986 



Planning Board 

Carolyn J. Fenn 
Thomas Firth 
Eugene E. Gilet 
Rosalind M. Boyle 
Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 
Charles A. Parlee 
Ann McCarthy 
John F. McCarthy 



Term Expired 1983 
Term Expires 1984 
Term Expires 1984 
Term Expires 1985 
Term Expires 1985 
Term Expires 1985 
Term Expires 1986 
Term Expires 1986 



School Committee 

Edward H. Hilliard Term Expired 1983 

Kenneth C. Taylor Term Expired 1983 

Carol C. Cleven Term Expires 1 984 

Samuel Poulten Term Expires 1 984 

Nicholas G. Gavriel Term Expires 1985 

Carl A. Olsson Term Expires 1986 

James Brough Term Expires 1986 

Sewer Commissioners 

DennisJ. Ready Term Expires 1984 

Burton A. Segall Term Expires 1985 

John P. Emerson, Jr. Term Expires 1986 

Trustees of Public Libraries 



Elizabeth A. McCarthy 
Howard K. Moore 
Roger P. Welch 
James W. Cooper 
Janet B. Hendl 
Brenda M. McDermott 


Term Expires 1984 
Term Expires 1984 
Term Expires 1985 
Term Expires 1985 
Term Expires 1986 
Term Expires 1986 


Constable 

William E. Spence 


Term Expires 1986 


Tree Warden 

Donald P. Gray 


Term Expires 1984 



Varney Playground Commissioners 
(Elected at Town Meeting) 
Bernard Battle Term Expired 1983 

Harry J. Ayotte Term Expires 1984 

Robert C. McManimon Term Expires 1985 

Reginald Tobias Term Expires 1986 



Finance 
(Appointed 
Mary B. Pease 
Thomas L. Gorndt 
Martin Ames 
Dwight M. Hayward 
James Decker 
Marion E. Marshall 
DavidJ. McLachlan 
George Ripsom 
William Edge 
George Nelson 
Roger Blomgren 



Committee 
by Moderator) 

Term Expired 1983 

Term Expires 1984 

Term Expires 1984 

Term Expires 1984 

Term Expires 1985 

Term Expires 1985 

Term Expires 1986 

Term Expires 1986 

Resigned 

Resigned 

Resigned 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



(Rear): Dennis J. Ready, Bradford O. Emerson, 
Harvey. 

On April 4, 1983, following the Town Elections, the 
Board of Selectmen met and elected Claude A. Harvey as 
Chairman, Bonita A. Towle as Vice Chairman and Brad- 
ford O. Emerson as Clerk. The membership of the Board 
also includes Paul C. Hart and Dennis J. Ready. 

Highlights of 1983 are summarized below: 

During January of 1983 the town had the biggest snow 
storm since the "Blizzard of 1978" with a total cost of 
nearly $47,000 for snow and ice removal. The restoration 
of the Old Town Hall in Chelmsford Centr was begun 
during January. Also during January a new Cultural 
Council was appointed with new goals and directions. 

The month of February brought continued complaints 
relative to Lowell Cable T.V.'s service to Chelmsford 
residents. Also during February, and after much discus- 
sion and controversy, the Selectmen turned down a re- 
quest from Burger King to locate a new restaurant on 
Chelmsford Street. 

During March the Selectmen and the Board of Health 
agreed on a plan to close the Swain Road Landfill. The 
Department of Public Works held a formal Public Hear- 
ing on phone service in the "251" area of Chelmsford. As 
a result of this hearing, which was called at the request of 
the Selectmen, a new switching system was installed in 
December of 1983. During March the Selectmen began 
the search for a suitable site for a new Dog Pound. 

Other than Town Meeting (elsewhere in this report) 
the big event in April was the first live telecast of the 
Selctmen's Meeting on Channel 43, the public access 
channel. 



Paul C. Hart. (Front): Bonita A. Towle, Claude A. 



May, in addition to bringing warm weather, brought 
Youth Govenment Day in Chelmsford. This annual 
event, sponsored by the Elks, places High School students 
in various Town elected and appointed positions. 
Groundbreaking for the new Tambone development on 
Billerica Road was held in early June. Also construction 
of the new Heritage Inn on Chelmsford Street was begun. 

During July the Selectmen began exploring ways of 
providing improved ambulance service, including the sta- 
tioning of an ambulance in Chelmsford. A Police Officer 
staioned in Central Square was re-instated and a bother- 
some rest area on Route 3 was finally closed at the request 
of the Selectmen. 

The major issue during August and September was the 
sale of the Middlesex County Training School in North 
Chelmsford. After months of urging by the Selectmen, 
the County Commissioners Finally agreed to sell the pro- 
perty. Final rules and regulations governing video games 
were promulgated by the Selectmen in September. Dur- 
ing October the Selectmen approved the recommenda- 
tion of the School Municipal Coordinating Committee to 
purchase voting machines. The Selectmen also 
unanimously voted to support the Wang/University of 
Lowell proposal to purchase the Training School in 
North Chelmsford. 

A Drug and Alcohol Abuse Committee was appointed 
by the Selectmen during November. The County Com- 
missioners finally agreed to sell the County Training 
School to Wang and the University of Lowell. Also a 
Committee was formed to study the feasibility of the 
Town hiring a full-time Town Engineer, and the newly 
formed Holiday Decorations Committee began to plan 
for the Holiday Season. 



During December the major issue confronting the 
Board was the quality of programming and service being 
provided by Lowell Cable T.V. 

In review, the major accomplishments during 1983 
were the final sale of the Training School, the completion 
of the Restoration of the Old Town Hall, improved tele- 
phone service in the "251" area, and the purchase of 
voting machines. 

The Board of Selectmen continued their active role in 
the Massachusetts Selectmen's Association, the Middlesex 
County Selectmen's Association, the Northern Middlesex 
Area Commission, the Middlesex County Advisory Board 
and the Massachusetts Municipal Association. Individual 
Selectmen also served as liaisons between the Board of 
Selectmen and various town and regional boards and 
commissions during the year. 

Due to the fact that National and State legislative deci- 
sions have a great impact on Town affairs, the Board 
maintained constant contact with Congressman 
Shannon's office as well as with Senator Carol Amick and 
State Representative Bruce Freeman. The Selectmen 
wish to express their gratitude to Congressman Shannon, 
Senator Amick and Representative Freeman for their 
help and cooperation during the past year. 



In closing, the Selectmen, on behalf of the citizens of 
Chelmsford, wish to express their sincere gratitude to the 
various Town boards and committees for their accom- 
plishments during the past year. It should be remem- 
bered that these boards and committees are composed of 
unpaid volunteers who take many long hours out of their 
free time to work on issues and projects that benefit the 
Town of Chelmsford. The Board also would like to 
recognize our competent and dedicated office staff of 
Mrs. Judith Carter and Mrs. Evelyn Newman. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Claude A. Harvey, Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Vice Chairman 

Bradford O. Emerson, Clerk 

Paul C. Hart, Member 

Dennis J. Ready, Member 

Norman E. Thidemann, Executive Secretary 



TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 
Elizabeth L. Delaney, Ass't. Town Clerk 



Sporting 
Licenses 


Dog 
Licenses 


Kennel 
Licenses 


Marriage 
Intentions 


1325 


2858 


11 


265 


Recorded 
Mortgages etc. 


Births (Inc.) 


Marriage 
Licenses 


Deaths 


687 


274 


264 


229 



WARRANT FOR 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

February 10, 1983 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High 
School Gymnasium on Thursday evening, the tenth day 
of February, 1983, at 7:30 o'clock P.M., then and there 
to act upon the following Articles, Viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of 5294,000 for the purpose of re- 
surfacing portions of certain streets throughout the Town 
with Type I Bituminous Concrete, and other road 
materials; or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the 
action of the 1982 Annual Town Meeting under Article 

13, authorizing the Board of Selectmen to transfer from 
the Stabilization Fund a sum of $294,000 for the purpose 
of resurfacing portions of certain streets throughout the 
Town with Type I Bituminous Concrete, and other road 
materials; or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $36,000 for the purpose of 
alleviating certain drainage problems existing in the 
Town, said work to be performed under the supervision 
of the Board of Selectmen; or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the 
action of the 1982 Annual Town Meeting under Article 

14, authorizing the Board of Selectmen to transfer from 
the Stabilization Fund a sum of $36,000 to alleviate cer- 
tain drainage problems existing in the Town; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $10,490 for the purchase of 
equipment for the Fire Department, such purchase to be 
made under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen, as 
follows: 

a. Six (6) Self Contained Breathing Apparatus 

b. One Thousand (1000) feet of 2V£ inch hose 

c. One (1) Portable Radio; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the 
action of the 1982 Annual Town Meeting under Article 
17, authorizing the Board of Selectmen to transfer from 
the Stabilization Fund a sum of $10,490 for the purchase 
of equipment for the Fire Department, such purchase to 
be made under the supervision of the Board of Select- 
men, as follows: 

a. Six (6) Self Contained Breathing Apparatus 

b. One Thousand (1000) feet of 2V£ inch hose 

c. One (1) Portable Radio: 
or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this Twenty-fifth day of 
January. A.D. 1983. 

Dennis J. Ready, Chairman 

Claude A. Harvey, Vice Chairman 

Bradford O. Emerson, Clerk 

Bonita A. Towle 

Paul C. Hart 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX. SS. 



January 27, 1983 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places 
to wit: The New Town Office Building Gym; North Con- 
gregational Church Hall; Parker School Band Room; 
East Chelmsford School; Byam School Cafetorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; North Congregational 
Church Hall; McCarthy Junior High School, Small Gym- 
nasium; South Row School Auditorium; South Row 
School Auditorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; McCar- 
thy Junior High School, Small Gymnasium; fourteen days 
at least before the time appointed for holding the 
meeting aforesaid. 



William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



A True Copy Attest, 

William E. Spence, Constable of Chelmsford 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

February 10, 1983 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order by the 
Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recognized the 
presence of a quorum, at 7:40 PM. Selectman Ready 
moved that the reading of the Constable's return of ser- 
vice and the posting of the warrant be waived. It was so 
voted. Selectman Ready then moved that the reading of 
the entire warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimous- 

iy- 

Norman Labrecque questioned the quorum present, 
the Moderator called for the following tellers to come for- 
ward and conduct a hand count: 



Selectman Ready moved to adjourn the Special Town 
Meeting, Sine die, motion carried. The meeting adjourn- 
ed at 8:25 PM. 



Richard Burtt 
Sandra Kilburn 
Vicki Cooper 



David McLachlan 
Edward Hilliard 
Carl Olsson 
Sue Cantin 



Dorothy Lerer 
Carol Stark 
Barbara Ward 



There were 291 voters present, Town By-Law requires 
300 voters for a quorum. Keith Edholm moved to adjourn 
the Special Town Meeting, the tellers came forward and 
a hand count was taken on the motion to adjourn: 94 Yes, 
180 No, motion defeated. The Moderator then asked for 
a hand count to establish the presence of a quorum. The 
tellers counted 309 voters present (the actual check in 
sheet reflects 324 present during the course of the 
meeting). The Special Town Meeting continued. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 George Ripsom, Chairman of 
the Finance Committee moved that the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $294,000. for the pur- 
pose of resurfacing portions of certain streets throughout 
the Town with Type I Bituminous Concrete, and other 
road materials. 

George Ripsom then gave a presentation explaining 
the purpose of having a Special Town Meeting. The ar- 
ticles were already voted and passed at the Annual Town 
Meeting of 4/82, and the monies were transferred from 
the stabilization fund, and raising and appropriate the 
required amount. This can be done due to the fact that 
the tax rate has not yet been set, these transfers would 
reflect 40< per thousand on the tax rate. Mr. Ripsom ask- 
ed for the support of the Town Meeting body for passage 
of this and the other articles. 

Selectmen Ready stated that the Board of Selectmen 
were not in favor of any of the articles. 

The Moderator asked for a voice vote on article 1 , mo- 
tion defeated, (a %'s vote required) 

George Ripsom of the Finance Committee moved to 
withdraw articles 2,3,4,5,&6. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote on the motion, motion carried. 



Dennis E. McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR 
THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

APRIL 2, 1983 and APRIL 25, 1983 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, 
Viz: 

Precinct 1. The New Town Office Building Gym 

Precinct 2. North Congregational Church Hall 

Precinct 3. Parker School Band Room 

Precinct 4. East Chelmsford School 

Precinct 5. Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6. Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 7. North Congregational Church Hall 

Precinct 8. McCarthy Junior High School, 

Small Gymnasium 

Precinct 9. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 10. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 1 1 . Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 12. McCarthy Junior High School, 

Small Gymnasium 

On Saturday, the second day of April, 1983, being the 
first Saturday in said month, at 10:00 A.M., for the 
following purposes: 

To bring in their vote for the following officers: 

Two Selectmen for thee years 

One Member of the Board of Assessors for three years 

One Member of the Board of Assessors for two years to 
fill vacancy 

One Cemetery Commissioner for three years 

One Cemetery Commissioner for one year to fill vacan- 



cy 



One member of Housing Authority for five years 
One member of Board of Health for three years 



One Park Commissioner for three years 

Two members of Planning Board for three years 

Two members of School Committee for three years 

One Sewer Commissioner for three years 

Two members of Public Library Trustees for three 
years 

One Constable for three years 

The polls will be open from 10:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.; 
and to meet in the McCarthy Junior High School Gym- 
nasium on Monday, the twenty-fifth (25th) day of April, 
1983, at 7:30 P.M. o'clock in the evening, then and there 
to act upon the following Articles, Viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To hear reports of Town Officers and 
Committees, or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law to be effective July 1 , 
1983 as follows: 

1. Under Section 6, "Classification of Present Town 
Employees", amend Subsection (E) — "Wage and 
Salary Schedule" — by deleting the existing schedule 
and substituting the following: 

E. WAGE AND SALARY SCHEDULE 

July 1, 1983 — June 30. 1984 



Grade Level 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 



LIBRARY 

1. Library Director 

2. Library Assistant Director 

3. Branch Librarian, Part-Time 

4. Librarian, Department Head 

5. Technical Services Department Head 

6. Fine Arts Department Head, Part-Time 

7. Library Specialist — Circulation 

8. Library Specialist — Reference Lib. 

9. Library Specialist — Sec./ Rec. 

10. Technical Services Assistant 

11. Librarian Assistant 

12. Librarian Clerk 

13. Aides 

14. Supervisor — Maintenance 

15. Maintenance Assistant 

MISCELLANEOUS 

1 . Animal Inspector 

2. Building Inspector 

3. Gas Inspector 

4. Electric Inspector 

5. Sealer of Weights and Measures 

6. Dog Officer 

7. Assistant Dog Officer 

8. Clock Winder 

9. Local Inspector 
10. Van Driver 

FOOTNOTES 

#6 -Salary will be 84% of the Fire Chief; 

And further amending Section 24 by adding the follow- 
ing positions: 





LIBRARY 


Salary Range 


1 . Library Director 


7.980-J11.012 


2. Library Department Head 


9,177-12,664 


3. Library Specialist 


10,374-14.316 


4. Library Assistant 


11.570-15,967 


5. Library Clerk 


12,768-17,620 


6. Maintenance Assistant 


13.965-19.271 


7. Page 


15.162-20,923 




16,359-22.575 


OTHER POSITIONS 


17.555-24,226 


1. Building Inspector 


18,753-25.880 


2. Electric Inspector 


19,950-27.530 


3. Local Inspector 


21,147-29,183 


4. Gas Inspector 


22,344-30,835 


5. Dog Officer 


23,540-32,485 


6. Assistant Dog Officer 


24,738-34,139 


7. Van Driver 


25,935-35.790 


8. Sealer of Weights and Measures 


27,132-37.442 


9. Animal Inspector 


28,328-39,094 


10. Clock Winder; 


29,525-40,745 




30,723-42,398 


or act in relation thereto. 



2. Under Section 24 subtitled "Job Titles and Stan- 
dard Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel 
Wage and Salary By-Law" by deleting the following 
positions and footnotes: 



Personnel Board 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law by further amending 
Section 24, Job Titles and Standard Rates for Wages and 
Salaries of the Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law, to 



conform to rates of pay negotiated by the Town with cer- 
tain labor organizations, pursuant to General Laws, 
Chapter 150E, and to reflect current salaries and grade 
levels under the Personnel By-Law as follows: 



#4 
#5- 



- Federal Minimum Hour Wage 

- Salary will be 200% of the highest paid union firefighters established by State 



or act in relation thereto. 



ADMINISTRATIVE & CLERICAL 

1 . Executive Secretary 

2. Town Accountant 

3. Veteran's Agent 

4 . Town Aide 

5. Assistant to Assessors. . . . 

6. Assistant Town Clerk 

7. Assistant Treasurer 

8. Clerk, Senior 

9. Clerk, Junior 

10. Clerk, Part-Time 

1 1 . Town Counsel 

12. Bd. of Reg. , Three members 

CONSERVATION, PARKS & CEMETERY 

1 . Cemetery Superintendent 

2. Supt. of Insect & Pest Control 

3. Landscaper— Park 

4. Laborer — Park 

5. Unskilled Laborer 

6. Skilled Forest Workman — Conservation 

7. Equipment Operator 

8. Park Superintendent 

CUSTODIAL 

1 . Custodian 

LIBRARY 

1 . Library Director 

2. Library Department Head 

3. Library Specialist 

4. Library Assistant 

5. Library Clerk 

6. Maintenance Assistant 

7 Page 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

1 . Highway Superintendent 

2. Highway Foreman 

TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1. Fire Chief 

2. Deputy Chief 

3. Captain 

4. Mechanic (Fire & Police) 

TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT 

1 . Police Chief 

2. Deputy Chief 

3. Captain 

RECREATION 

1 . Director/ Youth Coordinator 

2. Clerk, Part-Time 

3. Waterfront Director 

4. Swimming Instructor 

5. Lifeguard 

6. Playground Supervisor 

7 . Recreation Specialist 

8. Recreation Leader 

9. Youth Center Supervisor 

10. Youth Center Leaders 

OTHER POSITIONS 

1 . Building Inspector 

2. Electric Inspector 

3. Local Inspector 

4. Gas Inspector 

5. Dog Officer 

6. Assistant Dog Officer 

7 . Van Driver 

8. Sealer of Weights and Measures 

9. Animal Inspector 

10. Clock Winder 

FOOTNOTES 

#1 — Represented by Collective Bargaining 
#2 -Not in "Job Rating Plan" 



7/83-6/84 

Proposed 

Level 

16 
13 

8 
8 
6 
6 
6 
5 
2 
2 



Proposed 

Salary 



2 
1 
#2, #4 
1 
4 
9 



12 
5 
4 
3 
2 
2 
#2, #4 



IS 
9 



#2, #5 



$500 PA 
$360 EA. 



$1,250 P. A. 



#1 




6 




20 




17 




15 




9 




2 




$5.00/Hr. 


#2 


4.00/Hr. 


#2 


3.75/Hr. 


#2 


5.00/Hr. 


#2 


4.00/Hr. 


#2 


3.50/Hr. 


#2 


4 




2 




12 




9 




8 




#2 


$5,000 P. A. 


4 




2 




3 




#2 


2,000 P.A. 


#2 


1.000 P.A. 


#2 


100 P.A. 



Personnel Board 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate such sums of money as may be required to 
defray Town charges for the fiscal period from July 1 , 
1983 to June 30, 1984; or act in relation thereto. 

Town Treasurer 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1983; in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 
44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes as may be given 
for a period of less than one year in accordance with 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Town Treasurer 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
the Department of Revenue, Division of Accounts of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to make an audit of all 
accounts in all departments in the Town of Chelmsford; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Town Treasurer 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money with which to meet bills for previous years; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to match LEAA Federal Funds, for the 
purpose of providing mutual aid programs for the Police 
Department; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to pay the Treasurer of the Middlesex 
County Retirement System, the said amount being the 
Town's share of the pension expense and military service 
funds; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to be used as a Reserve Fund at the discre- 
tion of the Finance Committee, as provided in General 
Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6; or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 



10 



ARTICLE 1 1 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to pay reasonable hospital, medical and 
surgical, chiropractic, nursing, pharmaceutical, pro- 
sthetic and related expenses, and reasonable charges for 
podiatry pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 41, Sec- 
tion 100B, for certain retired police officers and fire- 
fighters as classified under Chapter 41, Section 100B of 
the Massachusetts General Laws, accepted by vote of the 
1979 Annual Town Meeting; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$1,800.00 to be used to join or buy into Elder Services of 
Merrimack Valley, Inc. for the purpose of obtaining ser- 
vices for the care of the Town's Older Americans; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of Chapter 90 Construc- 
tion; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer or borrow from available funds, 
or appropriate and transfer from the Stabilization Fund, 
a certain sum of money for the purpose of resurfacing 
portions of certain streets throughout the Town with 
Type I Bituminous Concrete, and other road materials; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



c. One (1) Compactor 

d. One (1) Sand Blaster 

e. One (1) Diesel Dump Truck 

f. One (1) Hydraulic Lift 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds or appropriate 
and transfer from the Stabilization Fund a certain sum of 
money for the purpose of completing the following 
repairs and replacements to Fire Department buildings 
and equipment, under the supervision of the Board of 
Selectmen; 

1. Roof repairs — Central Fire Station 

2. Replacement of fire alarm recorder with a digitized 
alarm box recorder 

3. Repair the body of Engine 3; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to sell by good and sufficient bill 
of sale equipment presently being used by the Highway 
Department. Police Department and Fire Department; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $10,000.00 from the sales of graves and lots to 
the Cemetery Improvement and Development Fund; or 
act in relation thereto. 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds or appropriate 
and transfer from the Stabilization Fund a certain sum of 
money to alleviate certain drainage problems existing in 
the Town; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds or appropriate 
and transfer from the Stabilization Fund a certain sum of 
money for the purpose of purchasing five (5) new four 
door sedan police cruisers, said purchase to be made 
under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen; or act in 
relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds or appropriate 
and transfer from the Stabilization Fund a certain sum of 
money for the purchase of equipment for the Highway 
Department, such purchase to be made under the super- 
vision of the Board of Selectmen, as follows: 

a. One (1) Asphalt Paver 

b. One (1) Brush Chipper 



Cemetery Commission 

ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds or appropriate 
and transfer from the Stabilization Fund a certain sum of 
money for the purpose of completing the following 
repairs and purchasing the following equipment for the 
Police Department, said contracts to be made under the 
supervision of the Board of Selectmen. 

a. Two (2) Electric Typewriters 

b. One (1) Computer 

c. NEMLEC Update Radio Equipment 

d. Four (4) Mobil Radio Units 

e. One (1) Tire Changing Machine 

f. Repairs to Police Station Roof; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
the following mentioned streets as laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen and shown by their reports and plans duly 
filed in the Office of the Town Clerk: 



11 



Tanglewood Drive 
Driftwood Drive 
Downing Place 
Kimberly Court 
Regina Driver 
Delpha Lane 
Roy Clough Lane 

Providing all construction of same meets with the re- 
quirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to the 
withholding of any remaining bonds until such require- 
ments have been met; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds or appropriate 
and transfer from the Stabilization Fund the sum of 
$31,600.00 for the purpose of automating the Chelms- 
ford Public Library; or act in relation thereto. 

Library Trustees 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 
32B, Section 9D, providing that the Town shall pay one- 
half of the premium costs payable by the surviving spouse 
of an employee or retired employee for group general, or 
blanket hospital, surgical, medical, dental or other 
health insurance; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
the provisions of Chapter 32B, Section 7A as amended, 
"Shall the Town in addition to the payment of fifty per- 
cent of a premium for contributory group life and health 
insurance for employees in the service of the town and 
their dependents, pay a subsidiary or additional rate?"; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 26. In the event of an affirmative vote on 
the foregoing Article, to see if the Town will vote to pay 
90% or some lesser percentage of the premiums for con- 
tributory group life and health insurance for town em- 
ployees; or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds or appropriate 
and transfer from the Stabilization Fund a certain sum of 
money for the purpose of completing Engineering Design 
and securing all necessary plans and specifications for im- 
plementation of Traffic Design at Central Square and 
Vinal Square, and further to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to complete all applications and take all neces- 
sary steps to apply for Federal and State funds for the im- 
plementation of these plans and specifications; and fur- 
ther to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter any and 



all contracts for the implementation of those plans and 
specifications, and for the expenditure of all Federal and 
State funds available to the Town for said implementa- 
tion; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Zoning By-Law, Article I — Administration and Pro- 
cedure—Section 1400, Planning Board— Subsection 
1424, Site Plan, by adding thereto after subparagraph (f) 
the following: 

"(g) All site plans submitted to the Planning Board 
for review must be accompanied by a $200.00 fee, 
payable to the Town of Chelmsford, to cover engin- 
eering expenses incurred by the Planning Board 
during the Site Plan review"; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Planning Board 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds or appropriate 
and transfer from the Stabilization Fund a certain sum of 
money for the purpose of preparing engineering design 
and purchase and installation of equipment to imple- 
ment emergency dialing number 911 in the Town of 
Chelmsford; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to reject as 
unworkable the relocation plan prepared by the Massa- 
chusetts Civil Defense Agency in conjunction with the 
Federal Emergency Agency that calls for the evacuation 
of Chelmsford residents to Claremont, New Hampshire, 
in the event of nuclear crisis; or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 31 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds or appropriate 
and transfer from the Stabilization Fund the sum of 
$12,000.00 for the purpose of preparing engineering 
design plans for the closure of the Swain Road landfill; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Board of Health 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$2,500.00 for the purpose of implementing Article X — 
"Control and Management of Hazardous Materials," to 
be supervised by the Chelmsford Board of Health; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Health 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the General By-Laws of the Town of Chelmsford by delet- 
ing therefrom the Article entitled "By-Law relating to the 
Establishment and Administration of Rent Regulation, 



12 



Minimum Standards for Use and Occupancy, and the 
Control of Evictions in Mobile Home Park Accomoda- 
tions in the Town of Chelmsford" , as adopted under Arti- 
cle 2 at the Special Town Meeting, November 8, 1982, in 
its entirety; or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to petition 
the Great and General Court of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts to enact special legislation for the purpose 
of rescinding the legislated Rent Control Law enacted by 
the Legislature under ST. 82 Ch. 237; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of Mosquito Control, 
under the supervision of the Board of Health; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Health 



d. The provisions of this By-Law shall not be ap- 
plicable in the event of an emergency requiring 
immediate action. 

e. Contracts for services of an official or profes- 
sional nature or services performed by municipal 
employees shall be exempt from the provisions of 
this By-Law. 

f. No contract having a value in excess of One 
Thousand Dollars ($1,000.00) shall be enforce- 
able against the Town unless it is in writing, 
signed by a majority of the Board, Committee, 
Officer or Department Head controlling the ap- 
propriation against which said obligation is in- 
curred. Provided, however, a Board or Commit- 
tee may by vote delegate the authority to execute 
said contract to a municipal employee, who shall 
act in its name. 

g. Every Board, Committee, Officer and Depart- 
ment Head shall make a record of every such 
contract in a book which shall be a public record 
of the Town; 



ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the General By-Laws, Article IV — Financial Regula- 
tions—Section 2 — Contracts Exceeding $300.00, as 
follows: 

1. Delete Section 2 in its entirety, and insert therein 
the following: 

"Section 2 — Contracts Exceeding $1,000.00 

a. Prior to the awarding of any contract or pur- 
chase of any materials, equipment or supplies, or 
engaging any services by any Board, Committee, 
Officer or Department of the Town at a cost or 
estimated cost exceeding One Thousand Dollars 
($1,000.00), the said Board, Committee, Officer 
or Department shall secure quoted prices or bids 
from sufficient vendors of the goods or services to 
ensure the Town securing the lowest available 
price. The lowest quoted price or bid shall be ac- 
cepted in every case, provided the vendor is 
financially responsible, and the bid is reasonable 
and complies with all conditions imposed by the 
awarding authority. In any event, the awarding 
authority may reject any or all bids if it is in the 
best interest of the Town to do so. 

b. No contract or purchase shall be so divided as to 
bring the amount below One Thousand Dollars 
($1 ,000.00) for the purpose of evading the provi- 
sions of this By-Law. 

c. In the event the option of securing bids is 
elected, these bids shall be obtained either by 
publication in a newspaper circulated within the 
Town or by circular letter sent to a sufficient 
number of vendors to ensure fair competition. 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen, for consideration of $28,000.00, 
to convey by good and sufficient quitclaim deed, all 
right, title and interest held by the Town in a certain 
parcel of property known as the East School to the 
Greater Lowell Council. Inc. — Boy Scouts of America, 
and further authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
negotiate the terms of the sale, including reversionary 
rights, use reservations and the land area to be conveyed; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Chelmsford Zoning By-Laws and Zoning Map by 
establishing new lines and striking out the designation 
"RB" District, and substituting in place thereof new lines 
and the designation "1A" District insofar as said Zoning 
By-Laws and Map relate to the following described 
premises: The land on the south side of Mill Road in said 
Chelmsford, consisting of approximately 9.8 acres, 
bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the Chelmsford/Billerica 
town line, located 800.00 feet southwesterly from 
the intersection of the westerly sideline of Route #3 
and said town line; thence 

SOUTHEASTERLY by the town line, 350.00 feet; 
thence 

SOUTHWESTERLY by a line running northwest- 
erly at an angle of 90° from said town line. 1230 
feet, more or less; thence 



13 



NORTHWESTERLY by the northwesterly sideline 
of Mill Road, 355 feet more or less, along the ex- 
isting zone line; thence 

NORTHEASTERLY by said zone line 1200 feet, 
more or less, to the point of beginning intersecting 
the Chelmsford/ Billerica town line at an angle of 
90°; 



ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to riase and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds or appropriate 
and transfer from the Stabilization Fund a certain sum of 
money for the purpose of construction of a dog pound on 
Town owned land near the Drum Hill Rotary; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



or act in relation thereto. 



Petition 



ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws, Article VII — Miscellaneous— by ad- 
ding the following section: 

"Section 9. Sodium Vapor Lamps Prohibited. 

The use of sodium vapor lamps for exterior lighting 
is prohibited within the boundaries of the Chelms- 
ford Historic District;" 

or act in relation thereto. 

Historic District Commission 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen, for consideration to be deter- 
mined, to convey all right, title and interest, if any, held 
by the Town in a certain parcel of land located on Perley 
Avenue, North Chelmsford, shown as Lot 53 on Assessor's 
Plat 14, containing 3,466 square feet of land, and more 
fully described in a deed recorded in Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds, Book 2224, Page 376; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 41 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen, for consideration to be deter- 
mined by appraisal and public bidding, to convey all 
right, title and interest, if any, held by the Town in a cer- 
tain parcel of land located on Monmouth Street, Chelms- 
ford, shown as Lot 33 on Assessor's Map 114, containing 
15,000 square feet of land, and more fully described in a 
deed recorded in Middlesex North District Registry of 
Deeds, Book 2539, Page 82; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Zoning By-Law, Article II — District Regulations- 
Section 2300 — Use Regulations Schedule, by adding 
under Assessory Uses the following: 

Home Child Care 

RA RB RC RM CA CB CC 1A IS RMH 
PPPOOOOOOP 



or act in relation thereto. 



Petition 



ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of publishing a Town His- 
tory from 1916 to 1975; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 148, 
Section 26G, an act further regulating the installation of 
automatic sprinkler systems; or act in relation thereto. 

Fire Department 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 148, 
Section 26E, an act further regulating the installation of 
smoke detectors in certain residential buildings and struc- 
tures; or act in relation thereto. 

Fire Department 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
from available funds the sum of $76,663.00 for the pur- 
pose of School Building Capital Improvements and 
Preservation and authorize the School Committee to pro- 
ceed with said project and to execute all necessary and 
proper contracts and agreements in respect thereto and 
to do all other acts necessary; or act in relation thereto. 

School Committee 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds or borrow a 
certain sum of money for the purpose of School Building 
Capital Improvements and Preservation and authorize 
the School Committee to proceed with said project and to 
execute all necessary and proper contracts and 
agreements in respect thereto, and to do all other acts 
necessary; or act in relation thereto. 

School Committee 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$5.00 for the purpose of providing annual compensation 
in the amount of $1.00 for each member of the School 
Committee; or act in relation thereto. 

School Committee 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds, or appropri- 
ate and transfer from the Stabilization Fund a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of purchasing a 12 foot 



14 



Cargo Van with Hydraulic Tailgate for the School 
Department; or act in relation thereto. 

School Committee 

ARTICLE 51 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the operation of the Chelmsford Public 
Schools, said sum to be reduced by the use of available 
and anticipated Federal Funds and Educational Collab- 
orative Funds; or act in relation thereto. 

School Committee 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the General By-Laws, Article VIII — Waste Disposal — by 
adding Section 5 as follows: 

"Section 5. Maintenance of Wastewater and Sew- 
age Disposal Systems. 

To ensure compliance with the requirements of the 
Board of Health, every owner, agent or occupant of 
premises on which there is a private wastewater or 
sewage disposal system shall keep such system in 
proper operational order, and shall provide a 
reasonable means of access for inspection and pum- 
ping. Residential properties shall have such system 
pumped every three (3) years. All commercial, in- 
dustrial and other non-residential establishments 
shall have their system pumped every two (2) years. 
Such pumping shall be made by private operators 
duly licensed by the Board of Health. More fre- 
quent pumpings may be ordered as deemed neces- 
sary by the Board of Health for the proper opera- 
tion of the subsurface septic system;" 



or act in relatin thereto. 



Sewer Commission 



ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the General By-Laws, Article VIII Waste Disposal — by 
adding Section 6 as follows: 

"Section 6. Connection to Public Sewer. 

The owners of all dwellings, buildings and other 
structures used for human occupancy, employ- 
ment, recreation or other related use abutting on 
any public or private way, alley or right-of-way in 
which there is now located or may be located a 
public sanitary sewer of the Town, shall be required 
at their expense to install suitable toilet facilities 
therein, and to connect such facilities directly with 
the public sewer in accordance with Sewer Commis- 
sion Regulations, within one (1) year from the date 
of official notice by the Sewer Commission. Provid- 
ed, however, that the Board of Health may order 
any person to connect with the public sewer at any- 
time if deemed to be in the best interest of the 
Town, upon giving thirty (30) days notice to do so;" 



ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Sewer Commission to negotiate and execute an 
Agreement with the City of Lowell and other municipali- 
ties for treatment and disposal of wastewater and septage 
from the Town of Chelmsford; or act in relation thereto. 

Sewer Commission 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen, for consideration to be deter- 
mined, to convey all right, title and interest, if any, held 
by the Town in a certain parcel of land, known as the 
North School Property, to a grantee to be selected by the 
Board of Selectmen for the purpose of developing Elderly 
Housing, and take all necessary steps to apply for or assist 
in the application for Federal grants available through 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to instruct 
the Board of Assessors to issue a certain sum of money 
from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
Tax Rate for the current fiscal period; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Finance Committee 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this Twenty-third day of 
March, A.D. 1983. 

Dennis J. Ready, Chairman 

Claude A. Harvey, Vice Chairman 

Bradford O. Emerson, Clerk 

Bonita A. Towle 

Paul C. Hart 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Middlesex, SS 



March, 1983 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit; The New Town Office Building Gym; North Con- 
gregational Church Hall; Parker School Band Room, 
East Chelmsford School; Byam School Cafetorium; West- 
lands School Cafctria; North Congregational Church 
Hall; McCarthy Junior High School, Small Gymnasium; 
South Row School Auditorium; South Row School Audi- 
torium; Westlands School Cafeteria; McCarthy Junior 
High School Small Gymnasium; Seven days at least be- 
fore the time appointed for holding the meeting 
aforesaid. 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



or act in relation thereto. 



Sewer Commission 



A True Copy Attest, 
William E. Spence Constable 



15 

TOWN ELECTION 

April 2, 1983 



SELECTMEN 3 Yrs (2) 

Paul C. Hart Re-election 
Dennis J. Ready Re-election 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



Pet 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 11 Pet 12 Total 



286 


178 


390 


86 


252 


276 


175 


209 


187 


278 


234 


276 


2827 


287 


157 


383 


89 


305 


273 


166 


212 


183 


274 


222 


281 


2832 


1 


4 





1 


1 














3 





1 


11 


218 


113 


245 


54 


234 


207 


85 


149 


136 


235 


150 


230 


2056 



792 



452 1018 



792 



756 



426 



570 



506 



790 



606 



788 7726 



ASSESSOR 3 Yrs 

Ruth K. Delaney Re-election 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

ASSESSOR 2 Yrs to fill Vacancy 

Albert R. Hobbs 

James H. McBride 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



324 


181 


397 


91 


294 


318 


178 


225 


200 


302 


252 


296 


3058 




















1 

















1 


72 


45 


112 


24 


102 


60 


34 


60 


53 


93 


51 


98 


804 



396 



226 



509 



115 



20 



41 



378 



63 



213 



67 



285 



37 



253 



395 



303 



115 



396 



378 



213 



394 3863 



312 


131 


365 


84 


295 


269 


131 


198 


186 


294 


212 


271 


2748 









































33 


27 


70 


11 


60 


46 


15 


50 


35 


53 


39 


72 


511 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONER 3 Yrs 

Gerald L. Hardy Re-election 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



292 


176 


385 


88 


279 


303 


175 


208 


187 


276 


237 


271 


2877 


1 



































1 


103 


50 


124 


27 


117 


75 


38 


77 


66 


119 


66 


123 


985 



396 



226 



509 



115 



396 



378 



303 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONER 1 Yr to fill Vacancy 
Charlotte P. DeWolf 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



308 


178 


394 


91 


287 


311 


184 


210 


199 


298 


249 


294 


2993 









































88 


48 


175 


24 


109 


67 


29 


75 


54 


107 


54 


100 


870 



396 



226 



509 



396 



378 



213 



395 



303 



394 3863 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 5 Yrs 

Brian D. Leonard 

Robert L. Hughes Re-election 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



136 


69 


135 


38 


135 


115 


70 


86 


106 


183 


97 


146 


1316 


208 


139 


293 


64 


186 


215 


130 


148 


116 


162 


172 


175 


2008 









































52 


18 


81 


13 


75 


48 


13 


51 


31 


50 


34 


73 


539 



396 



226 



509 



115 



396 



378 



213 



285 



BOARD OF HEALTH 3 Yrs 

Paul J. Canniff Re-election 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



291 


167 


380 


86 


276 


306 


175 


204 


191 


281 


229 


266 


2852 









































105 


59 


129 


29 


120 


72 


38 


81 


62 


114 


74 


128 


1011 



396 



226 



509 



115 



396 



378 



213 



285 



PARK COMMISSIONER 3 Yrs 

Eileen M. Duffy Re-election 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

PLANNING BOARD 3 Yrs (2) 

John F. McCarthy 

Ann M. McCarthy Re-election 

Paul F. Bartel 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



314 


182 


398 


92 


292 


308 


179 


222 


192 


301 


255 


282 


3017 









































82 


44 


111 


23 


104 


70 


34 


63 


61 


94 


48 


112 


846 


396 


226 


509 


115 


396 


378 


213 


285 


253 


395 


303 


394 


3863 


177 


104 


175 


69 


168 


161 


102 


102 


176 


195 


149 


132 


1710 


265 


141 


325 


67 


236 


262 


138 


180 


138 


254 


204 


262 


2472 


176 


100 


238 


35 


196 


162 


98 


149 


66 


167 


113 


190 


1690 









































174 


107 


280 


59 


192 


171 


88 


139 


126 


174 


140 


204 


1854 



792 



230 



792 



570 



790 



606 



788 7726 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 3 Yrs (2) > 

James Brough 

Edward H. Milliard Re-election 

Carl A. Olsson 

Elias Safdie 

Kenneth C. Taylor Re-election 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



149 


111 


203 


83 


181 


112 


80 


111 


97 


169 


103 


127 


1481 


105 


61 


134 


27 


88 


95 


58 


53 


60 


81 


75 


119 


956 


220 


143 


255 


80 


268 


257 


120 


166 


168 


232 


223 


174 


2306 


103 


20 


146 


19 


86 


76 


43 


66 


57 


109 


42 


143 


910 


127 


73 


216 


38 


125 


140 


88 


120 


75 


133 


91 


167 


1393 


1 



































1 


87 


44 


64 


28 


44 


76 


37 


54 


49 


66 


72 


58 


679 



792 



230 



792 



756 



426 



570 



790 



788 7726 



SEWER COMMISSIONER 3 Yrs 

John P. Emerson, Jr. Re-election 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



306 


179 


379 


99 


276 


302 


177 


208 


190 


279 


239 


265 


2899 


1 











1 























2 


89 


47 


130 


16 


119 


76 


36 


77 


63 


116 


64 


129 


962 



396 



226 



378 



213 



285 



253 



395 



303 



394 3863 



16 



LIBRARY TRUSTEE 3 Yrs (2) 

Janet B. Hendl Re-election 

D. Lorraine Lambert 

Brenda M. McDermott Re-election 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



203 


108 


299 


55 


220 


217 


100 


160 


139 


239 


178 


238 


2156 


155 


151 


256 


56 


166 


148 


147 


116 


110 


140 


113 


150 


1708 


263 


119 


309 


65 


255 


258 


104 


184 


142 


265 


191 


240 


2395 









































171 


74 


154 


54 


151 


133 


75 


110 


115 


146 


124 


160 


1467 



452 1018 



230 



792 



756 



426 



570 



506 



790 



606 



788 7726 



CONSTABLE 3 Yrs 

William E. Spence Re-election 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



305 


187 


400 


107 


286 


314 


180 


210 


195 


297 


245 


277 


3003 


3 





1 





























4 


88 


39 


108 


8 


110 


64 


S3 


75 


58 


98 


58 


117 


856 



396 



226 



509 



115 



378 



394 3863 



17 



WARRANT FOR 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



May 16, 1983 



MIDDLESEX, SS: 



To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High 
School Gymnasium on Monday evening, the sixteenth 
day of May, 1983 at 8:00 o'clock P.M., then and there to 
act upon the following Articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of construction of a dog 
pound; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to determine 
that there exists an emergency with respect to the housing 
of a substantial number of citizens in the Town of 
Chelmsford, which emergency has been created by ex- 
cessive, abnormally high and unwarranted rent increases 
imposed by some owners of mobile home parks located 
therein; that unless mobile home park rents and eviction 
of tenants are regulated and controlled, such emergency 
will produce serious threats to the public health, safety, 
and general welfare of the citizens of said Town, par- 
ticularly the elderly; that such emergency should be met 
immediately and with due record for the rights and 
responsibilities of the citizenry of the Town of Chelmsford 
by petitioning the Great and General Court of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts to enact special Legislation 
enabling the Town of Chelmsford to amend its code for 
the purpose of controlling rents and evictons in Mobile 
Home Parks. Such Legislation shall read as follows: 

Mobile Home Park Rent Control By-Law 

A By-Law establishing a MOBILE HOME PARK 
RENT CONTROL BOARD in the Town of 
Chelmsford, setting forth the powers and duties of 
the MOBILE HOME PARK RENT CONTROL 
BOARD, establishing standards and procedures: 

Section 1. This By-Law shall be known and may be 
cited as the "MOBILE HOME PARK RENT CON- 
TROL ACT." 

Section 2. Definitions: For the purposes of this By- 
Law, the following terms, phrases, words and their 
derivations shall have the meaning given herein, 
unless the context in which they are used clearly re- 
quires a different meaning. 



(1) "Rent Board" and "Board" mean the MOBILE 
HOME PARK RENT CONTROL BOARD as 
established herein. 

(2) "Mobile Home" shall mean a dwelling unit 
built on a chassis and containing complete elec- 
trical, plumbing and sanitary facilities, and 
designed to be installed on a temporary or a 
permanent foundation for permanent living 
quarters. 

(3) "Mobile Home Park" means a park licensed by 
the Board of Health pursuant to Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 140, Section 32B. 

(4) "Rules and Regulations" means rules and regu- 
lations as promulgated by the BOARD. 

(5) "Shall" is mandatory; "May" is permissive. 

Section 3. Mobile Home Park Rent Control 
Board: There is hereby established a Mobile Home 
Park Rent Control Board consisting of five residents 
of the Town of Chelmsford to be appointed by the 
Board of Selectmen of the Town of Chelmsford. 

Section 4. Duties and Powers: 

(1) The BOARD shall set maximum rents, set 
minimum standards for use or occupancy of 
Mobile Home Parks and evictions of tenants 
therefrom; may require information of said 
owners relating to their parks under penalties 
of perjury. 

(2) The BOARD may make rules and regulations, 
sue and be sued, compel attendance of persons 
and the production of papers and information 
and issue appropriate orders which shall be 
binding on both the owner and tenants of such 
Mobile Home Park accommodations. 

Section 5. Standards for Adjusting Rents: 

(1) The BOARD may make individual or general 
adjustments, either upward or downward, as 
may be necessary to assure that tenants for 
Mobile Home Park accommodations are estab- 
lished on levels which yield to owners a fair net 
operating income for such units. 

(2) Fair net operating income shall be that income 
which will yield a return, after all reasonable 
operating expenses, on the fair market value of 
the property, equal to the debt service rate 
generally available from institutional first 
mortgage lenders or such other rates of return 
as the BOARD, on the basis of evidence pre- 
sented before it, deems more appropriate to the 
circumstances of the case. 

(3) Fair market value shall be the assessed valua- 
tion of the property or such other valuation as 



18 



the BOARD, on the basis of evidence presented 
before it, deems more appropriate to the cir- 
cumstances of the case. 

(4) The BOARD may establish further standards 
and rules consistent with the foregoing. 

Section 6. Summary Process: The BOARD may 
regulate evictions of tenants at Mobile Home Parks 
and may issue orders which shall be a defense to an 
action of Summary Process for possession. 

Section 7. Review: 

(1) The BOARD and its actions shall be subject to 
the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 30A, (Administrative Procedures Act) 
as if the BOARD were an agency of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts. 

(2) The District Court of Lowell shall have original 
jurisdiction, concurrently with the Superior 
Court, of all petitions for review brought pur- 
suant to Section Fourteen of Chapter 30A of 
the General Laws. 

(3) The Superior Court shall have jurisdiction to 
enforce the provisions of this By-Law, and may 
restrain by injunction violations thereof. 

Section 8. Maximum Rent: 

(1) The maximum rent of a Mobile Home Lot or 
Unit shall be the rent charged the occupant for 
the month six months prior to the acceptance 
of this Article by Town Meeting. If the rental 
unit was unoccupied at that time but was oc- 
cupied at any time prior to acceptance of this 
act, the maximum rent shall be the rent charg- 
ed therefore for the month closest to and prior 
to six months prior to the acceptance of this Ar- 
ticle by Town Meeting. 

(2) If the maximum rent is not otherwise estab- 
lished, it shall be established by the BOARD. 
Any maximum rent may be subsequently ad- 
justed under the provisions of Sections 4 and 5. 

Section 9. Penalties: Violations of this By-Law or 
any other of the Board shall be punishable by a fine 
of not more than One Thousand (SI, 000. 00) Dol- 
lars for any one offense. 

Section 10. Severability: If any provisions of this 
By-Law shall be held invalid, the validity of the re- 
mainder of this By-Law shall not be affected 
thereby. 



Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this Twenty-eighth day of 
April, A.D. 1983 

Claude A. Harvey, Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Vice Chairman 

Bradford O. Emerson, Clerk 

Paul C. Hart 

Dennis J. Ready 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Middlesex, SS 



April 29, 1983 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places 
to wit: The New Town Office Building Gym; North Con- 
gregational Church Hall; Parker School Band Room; 
East Chelmsford School; Byam School Cafetorium; West- 
lands School Cafeteria; North Congregational Church 
Hall: McCarthy Junior High School, Small Gymnasium; 
South Row School Auditorium; South Row School Audi- 
torium: Westland School Cafeteria; McCarthy Junior 
High School, Small Gymnasium; fourteen days at least 
before the time appointed for holding the meeting afore- 
said. 

William E. Spence 
Constable, Town of Chelmsford 

A True Copy Attest, 
William E. Spence, Constable 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

April 25, 1983 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:45 
PM by the Moderator Dennis McHugh, who recognized 
the presence of a quorum. There were 742 voters present. 

The Moderator then recognized the students that were 
present at the meeting as members of Student Govern- 
ment, which will be on Thursday. April 28, 1983. The 
Moderator read the names and the offices that the 
students will be holding, they are as follows: 



or act in relation thereto. 



Petition 



Elected Officials 

Board of Selectmen 

Dana Cashman 

Karen Currier 

Rick Homann 

Nancy Russell 

Matt St. Hilaire, Chairman 



Veterans Agent 

Thea Dukakis 

Library Trustee 

Cathy Sullivan 



19 



School Committee 

Michelle Adams 

Tom Krause 

Wendy Marshall 

Jennifer Zucowska 

Paul Arenstam, Chairman 

Board of Health 

Beth Bellmore 
Sue Bungard 
Debbie Pepper 

Board of Assessors 

Karen Johnson 
Michelle MacQuarrie 
Gina Signorello 

Town Clerk 

Erin Sheehy 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 
Julie Burns 



Finance Committee 
Kellie Dunn 
Laura Dinnigan 
Larissa Shyjan 

Town Aide 

Tim Mcllvenna 

Executive Secretary to 
Selectmen 

Judy Harrington 

Supt. of Public Buildings 

Donna Goodwill 

Superintendent of Schools 

Laure Novellina 

Building Inspector 

Rachel Geary 

Wiring Inspector 

Tom St. Germain 



UNDER ARTICLE 1. Selectman Claude Harvey mov- 
ed that the Town hear reports of Town Officers and 
Committees. 

Selectman Harvey moved to hear nominations from the 
floor for the Varney Playground Commission. Motion 
carried. Selectman Hart moved to nominate Reginald 
Tobias for a three year term. The Moderator asked for 
any more nominations from the floor, hearing none, the 
Moderator delcared that nominations were closed. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the nomination of 
Reginald Tobias as Varney Playground Commissioner, it 
was so voted unanimously. 

Paul D. Henderson moved to take out of order articles 
24, 25 & 26, in sequence. The Finance Committee was 
not in favor of taking article 24 out of order at this time, 
but agreed to take articles 25 & 26 out of order. The 
Selectmen were in favor of taking all three articles out of 
order. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the mo- 
tion to take the three articles out of order, which was 
questioned. The following tellers came forward, and a 
hand count was taken: 



Appointed Officials 
Planning Board 

Janice Calileo 
Amy Costa 
Karen Powers 

Housing Authority 

Nancy Chang 
Karen Ames 

Town Accountant 

Deana Sullivan 



Cemetery Superintendent 

Keith Silver 

Superintendent of Streets 

Jeff Reisert 

Fire Chief 

Steve Jurius 

Police Chief 

Tom Vargeletis 



Myra Silver 
Barbara Ward 
Jane Drury 
Ina Greenblatt 



Dorothy Lerer 
Edward Mashall 
William Drury 
David McLachlan 



Margaret Johnson 
Edward Hilliard 
Carolyn Fenn 



The Moderator moved that the reading of the con- 
stable's return of service and the posting of the warrant be 
waived. It was so voted unanimously. Selectman Harvey 
then moved that the reading of the entire warrant be 
waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 

George Ripsom, Chairman of the Finance Committee 
moved to recess the Annual Town Meeting at 7:55 PM in 
order to conduct a Public Budget Hearing of Federal 
Revenue Sharing Funds. The Annual Town Meeting will 
reconvene at the end of the Federal Revenue hearing. 
Motion carried, unanimously. 

George Ripsom, Chairmanjof the Finance Committee, 
discussed the Federal Revenue Sharing. The sum of 
$240,000. will be available for use in the fiscal year 
1983-1984 be allocated as follows: Fire Department 
Salaries $120,000.00, Police Department Salaries 
$120,000.00. The transfer and appropriation of these 
funds will be through approval of respective departmen- 
tal budgets as they are brought before the body for ac- 
tion. The sum of $240,000.00 represents approximately 
29<f on the tax rate. Mr. Ripsom moved to have the Town 
Meeting body accept for approval the Federal Revenue 
Sharing Funds Budget as presented. 

Mr. Ripsom moved to reconvene the Annual Town 
Meeting at 8:00 PM, motion carried. 



Result of the hand count: Yes 424, No 160, motion car- 
ried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 24. Selectmen Harvey moved that 
the Town vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 32B, Section 9D, providing that 
the Town shall pay one-half of the premium costs payable 
by the surviving spouse of an employee or retired 
employee for group general, or blanket hospital, surgical, 
medical, dental or other health insurance. 

The Finance Committee was not in favor of this article. 
The Board of Selectmen supported the article. A discus- 
sion took place, William Drury moved to table this article 
until after the outcome of articles 25 & 26. The 
Moderator attempted a voice vote, which left the chair in 
doubt, the tellers came forward and a hand count was 
taken: Yes 181 , No 405, motion defeated. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote on the article, which left him in 
doubt, he then asked for a show of hands, motion car- 
ried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 25. Grace Dunn moved that the 
Town vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 32B, Sec- 
tion 7A as amended, "Shall the Town in addition to the 
payment of fifty percent of a premium for contributory 
group life and health insurance for employees in the ser- 
vice of the Town and their dependents, pay a subsidiary 
or additional rate?" 

George Ripsom, Chairman of the Finance Committee, 
stated the reasons why the Finance Committee was 
against passage of this article. He explained that if this 
article was passed, that budgets would have to be cut in 
order to absorb the cost. 



20 



Chris Simorellis spoke in favor of articles 25 & 26. He 
explained that this article was not a negotiable item, and 
that it could only be raised on town meeting floor. He 
presented eight reasons explaining why Town employees 
should receive the increase benefit. 

Selectman Emerson stated that the Board of Selectmen 
were against passage of this article. A lengthy discussion 
took place, a lot of questions were raised and answered, 
Grace Dunn moved the question. The Moderator asked if 
the Town Meeting body wanted to hear any further 
debate, if not then he would take a vote on the article. 
Hearing none he moved to vote on the article. George 
Ripsom, Chairman of the Finance Committee moved for 
a secret ballot vote on the article. The Moderator ex- 
plained the details involved for having a secret ballot. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion for a 
secret ballot, motion defeated. The Moderator then ask- 
ed for a voice vote on the main motion, which left the 
chair in doubt. A hand count was taken: Yes 366, No 288 
motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 26. The Finance Committee was 
against passage of this article. Selectman Emerson said 
that the Selectmen were against passage also. Spotswood 
Bowers moved to amend the article to read no more than 
70%. A lengthy discussion followed. Robert Sexton mov- 
ed to dismiss the article by laying it on the table. After 
much discussion the Moderator asked for a 15 minute re- 
cess, in order to obtain a legal opinion from James Harr- 
ington, Town Counsel, on the motion to dismiss. The 
meeting recessed at 9:45 PM. The Moderator reconvened 
the meeting at 10:00 PM and Town Counsel explained 
that according to the General By-laws if an article is put 
on the table then it could be brought up at any time 
within the time span of the Annual Town Meeting. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to table. 
Motion defeated. More discussion took place and Ber- 
nard Ready, moved to amend the article to read pay 
75%. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the mo- 
tion, motion defeated. The Moderator then explained 
that the main motion as amended (no more than 70%) 
was now on the floor again for discussion. 

Frank McGurk moved to table this article, in order for 
the Finance Committee to prepare figures of percentages. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to 
table, motion defeated. Paul Henderson moved the ques- 
tion to stop debate. The Moderator asked if the Town 
Meeting body wanted to hear any further debate, if not 
then he would take a vote on the article as amended. 
Hearing none he moved to a voice vote, motion defeated. 
Paul Henderson moved to stop debate on the original mo- 
tion (pay 90%). The Moderator asked for a voice vote on 
the motion to stop debate, motion defeated. After more 
lengthy discussion. Selectman Ready moved to amend the 
article to substitute the figure of 60% for 90%. The 
Board of Selectmen were in favor of this percentage 
figure as were the Finance Committee. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote on the motion which left the chair 
in doubt, the tellers came forward and a hand count was 
taken: Yes 334, No 261, motion carried. The Moderator 
then asked for a voice vote on the main motion as amend- 
ed, which left the chair in doubt, the tellers came forward 



and a hand count was taken. Result of the count Yes 335, 
No 258, motion carried and the article reads as follows: 

Grace Dunn moved that the Town vote to pay 60% of 
the premiums for contributory group life and health in- 
surance for Town employees. 

Selectman Emerson moved to adjourn the Annual 
Town Meeting until Monday, May 9th, at 7:30 PM at the 
McCarthy Jr. High Gym. Motion Carried, by voice vote. 
The meeting adjourned at 10:35 PM. 



Dennis McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 9, 1983 

The Moderator Dennis McHugh called the meeting to 
order at 7:35 PM, there were 252 voters present. Repre- 
sentative Bruce N. Freeman then presented and read to 
the Town Meeting body a proclamation pertaining to 
Blood Blitz days in the Town of Chelmsford. Donald 
Boucher, Dean at CHS is in charge of the drive which will 
be on May 20th & 21st. Chairman of the Board of Select- 
men, Claude Harvey accepted the proclamation. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2. Alan Murphy, Chairman of the 
Personnel Board moved that the Town vote to amend the 
Personnel Wages and Salary By-Law to be effective July 
1. 1983. as follows: 

1 . Under Section 6. "Classification of Present Town 
Employees", amend Subsection (E) — "Wage and 
Salary Schedule" — by deleting the existing schedule 
and substituting the following: 

E. WAGE AND SALARY SCHEDULE 

July 1, 1983 — June 30, 1984 



Grade Level 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 



Salary Range 

7. 980-511, 012 
9.177-12.664 
10.374-14,316 
11,570-15,967 
12,768-17.620 
13.965-19,271 
15.162-20,923 
16,359-22,575 
17,555-24.226 
18,753-25,880 
19,950-27.530 
21,147-29.183 
22,344-30,835 
23,540-32,485 
24,738-34,139 
25,935-35,790 
27.132-37,442 



21 



18 
19 
20 



28,328-39,094 
29,525-40,745 
30,723-42,398 



2. Under Section 24 subtitled "Job Titles and Stan- 
dard Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel 
Wage and Salary By-Law" by deleting the following 
positions and footnotes: 

LIBRARY 

1. Library Director 

2. Library Assistant Director 

3. Branch Librarian, Part-Time 

4. Librarian, Department Head 

5. Technical Services Department Head 

6. Fine Arts Department Head, Part-Time 

7. Library Specialist — Circulation 

8. Library Specialist — Reference Lib. 

9. Library Specialist — Sec. /Rec. 

10. Technical Services Assistant 

11. Librarian Assistant 

12. Librarian Clerk 

13. Aides 

14. Supervisor — Maintenance 

15. Maintenance Assistant 

MISCELLANEOUS 

1. Animal Inspector 

2. Building Inspector 

3. Gas Inspector 

4. Electric Inspector 

5. Sealer of Weights and Measures 

6. Dog Officer 

7. Assistant Dog Officer 

8. Clock Winder 

9. Local Inspector 
10. Van Driver 

FOOTNOTES 

#6 -Salary will be 84% of the Fire Chief; 

And further amending Section 24 by adding the follow- 
ing positions: 

LIBRARY 

1 . Library Director 

2. Library Department Head 

3. Library Specialist 

4. Library Assistant 

5. Library Clerk 

6. Maintenance Assistant 

7. Page 

OTHER POSITIONS 

1 . Building Inspector 

2. Electric Inspector 

3. Local Inspector 

4. Gas Inspector 

5. Dog Officer 

6. Assistant Dog Officer 

7. Van Driver 

8. Sealer of Weights and Measures 

9. Animal Inspector 
10. Clock Winder 



The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
Alan Murphy, Chairman of the Personnel Board spoke 
briefly about the article. The Moderaor asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3. Alan Murphy, Chairman of the 
Personnel Board moved that the Town vote to amend the 
Personnel Wage and Salary By-law by further amending 
Section 24, Job Titles and Standard Rates for wages and 
salaries of the Personnel Wage and Salary By-law, to con- 
form to rates of pay negotiated by the Town with certain 
labor organizations, pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 
150E, and to reflect current salaries and grade levels 
under the Personnel By-Law as follows: 



ADMINISTRATIVE & CLERICAL 

1 . Executive Secretary 

2 . Town Accountant 

3. Veteran's Agent 

4 . Town Aide 

5. Assistant to Assessors 

6. Assistant Town Clerk 

7. Assistant Treasurer 

8. Clerk, Senior 

9. Clerk. Junior 

10. Clerk, Part-Time 

1 1 . Town Counsel 

12. Bd. of Reg. , Three members 

CONSERVATION, PARKS & CEMETERY 

1 . Cemetery Superintendent 

2. Supt. of Insect & Pest Control 

3. Landscaper — Park 

4. Laborer— Park 

5. Unskilled Laborer 

6. Skilled Forest Workman — Conservation .... 

7. Equipment Operator 

8. Park Superintendent 

CUSTODIAL 

1 . Custodian 

LIBRARY 

1 . Library Director 

2. Library Department Head 

3. Library Specialist 

4. Library Assistant 

5. Library Clerk 

6. Maintenance Assistant 

7. Page 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

1 . Highway Superintendent 

2. Highway Foreman 

TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1. Fire Chief 

2. Deputy Fire Chief 

3. Captain 

4. Mechanic (Fire & Police) 

TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT 

1 . Police Chief 

2. Deputy Chief 

3. Captain 

RECREATION 

1 . Director/ Youth Coordinator 

2. Clerk, Part-Time 

3. Waterfront Director 

4. Swimming Instructor 

5. Lifeguard 

6. Playground Supervisor 

7. Recreation Specialist 

8. Recreation Leader 

9. Youth Center Supervisor 

10. Youth Center Leaders 



7/83-6/84 

Proposed 

Level 

16 
13 
8 
8 
6 
6 
6 
5 
2 
2 



2 

1 
#2, #4 
1 
4 
9 



Proposed 
Salary 



$500 P. A. 
S360 EA. 



12 




5 




4 




3 




2 




2 




#2, #4 




13 




9 




#2, #5 




#2 




#1 




6 




20 




17 




15 




9 




2 




$5.00/Hr. 


#2 


4.00/Hr. 


#2 


3.75/Hr. 


#2 


5.00/Hr. 


#2 


4.00/Hr. 


#2 


3.50/Hr. 


#2 


4 




2 





22 



OTHER POSITIONS 

1 . Building Inspector 12 

2. Electric Inspector 9 

3. Local Inspector 8 

4. Gas Inspector ("5, 500) #2 $5,000 P.A. 

5. Dog Officer 4 

6. Assistant Dog Officer 2 

7. Van Driver 3 

8. Sealer of Weights and Measures #2 2.000 P.A. 

9. Animal Inspector <*2 1 .000 P.A. 

10. Clock Winder #2 100 P.A. 

FOOTNOTES •motion to amend 

#1 — Represented by Collective Bargaining 

#2— Not in 'Job Rating Plan" 

#4 — Federal Minimum Hour Wage 

#5 - Salary will be 200% of the highest paid union firefighters established by State 

law; 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
Building Inspector Ronald Wetmore, moved to amend 
the gas inspector's figure from $5,000. to S5.500. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to 
amend, motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote on the main motion as amended, 
motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4. James R. Doukszewicz, Trea- 
surer moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
such sums of money as may be required to defray Town 
Charges for the fiscal period from July 1 . 1983 to June 30, 
1984. 

The Moderator explained that the budgets will not be 
voted on individually, but may be discussed individually. 
A vote will be taken on the entire budget at the end of the 
last budget, (waste collection). 

The following budget line items were amended by 
George Ripsom, of the Finance Committee as they came 
on the floor for discussion. The Moderator took a voice 
vote on each, motion carried, on each. 

Debt and Interest Line item 22: Total Interest 
$222,967. (was $177,967); Highway Department Line 
item 40: Snow and Ice $270,000. (was $225,000); In- 
surance Department Delete the line item #'s presently 
appearing (51 & 52) and identify the item "Total Insur- 
ance Department" as line item #51/52. Change the 
amount of line item 51/52 to $1,025,513. (was $914,513). 

Under the Hydrant service budget. Robert Harmon, 
Water Commissioner for the Center Water District, ex- 
plained why it was necessary for the Town to have and 
maintain this budget. (Finance Committee recommend- 
ed $0.00 for the total budget.) George Ripsom of the 
Finance Committee explained why the Finance Commit- 
tee felt that the individual Water Commissioners should 
be responsible for the monies required. J. Paul Bienvenu, 
Water Commissioner and Treasurer of the Center Water 
District, moved to amend the budget to read as follows: 



Line 42 Center 


43,500 


43 North 


18.300 


44 East 


7.000 


45 South 


5,500 


TOTAL 


74,300 



After a lengthy discussion, Ronald Wetmore moved 
the question to stop debate. The Moderator explained 
that if there was no more need for discussion then he 
would take a vote on the motion to amend as presented. 
Hearing none, he asked for a voice vote on the motion to 
amend, motion carried and the Hydrant service budget 
was reinstated. 

Norman LeBrecque moved to amend the Police 
Department Budget by reducing the salaries line item #68 
by 5% ($1,563,577). Motion defeated by voice vote. 

George Ripsom, of the Finance Committee then ex- 
plained that the figure voted on as amended under the 
Debt & Interest Budget (line item 22) of $222,967. was 
wrong and amended the figure to now read $212,967., 
which would reflect the total amount for the debt and in- 
terest to be $1,051,028. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote on the motion with the new figure of $212,967., mo- 
tion carried. 

Harry Ayotte of the V'arney Playground Commission 
moved to amend this budget to reflect the following 
figures: 



Line item 125 Labor-Part time 
Line item 126 Expenses 



$3,000. (was 3,500) 
$1,999. (was 1,499) 



The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to 
amend, motion carried. 

George Ripsom of the Finance Committee moved that 
the following figures be accepted: The gross departmen- 
tal budget of $25,479,795. less the transfers of Revenue 
Sharing $240,000., Cemetery P/C interest $15,000. and 
Library State Aid $15,587. for a total transfer figure of 
$270,587.. for a total Raise and Appropriate sum of 
$25,209,208. to defray Town charges for the fiscal period 
from July 1. 1983 to June 30, 1984. Motion carried, 
unanimously. The budget reads as follows: 



ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

1 . Wages and Salaries 

2. Expenses 

3. Outlay 

TOTAL ACCOUNTING DEPT. 



Finance 

Comm. Recom. 

$ 66,101. 

1,500. 

3,000. 

70,601. 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR DEPARTMENT 

4. Inspectors Salary 

5. Expenses 

TOTAL ANIMAL INSPECTORS DEPT. 
BOARD OF APPEALS 

ASSESSOR'S DEPARTMENT 

7. Salaries 

8. Expenses 

9. Outlay 

10. Legal Services 

TOTAL ASSESSORS DEPT. 



.000. 
400. 



1,400. 



4,986. 



92,280. 

24,450. 

5,000. 

L 

121,731. 



23 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

1 1 . Salaries 

12. Expenses 

13. Out of State 

14. Outlay 

Total Cemetery Department 
Transfer from P/C Interest 

NET COST CEMETERY DEPT. 

CIVILIAN DEFENSE 

15. Expenses 

16. Outlay 

TOTAL CIVILIAN DEFENSE 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

17. Expenses 

CONSTABLE 

18. Constable's Salary 

COUNCIL ON AGING-TOWN AIDE 

19. Salaries 

20. Expenses 

TOTAL COA-TOWN AIDE 

DEBT AND INTEREST 

21. Total Debt 

22. Total Interest 

TOTAL DEBT AND INTEREST 

DOG OFFICER 

23. Wages and Salaries 

24. Expenses 

25. Pound Rental 

26. Care of Deceased Animals 

TOTAL DOG OFFICER 

EDWARDS MEMORIAL BEACH 

27. Expenses 

ELECTIONS 

28. Wages and Expenses 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

29. Expenses 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

30. Salaries 

31. Expenses 

32. Out of State 

33. Outlay 

Total Fire Department 
Appropriation from Revenue Sharing 
for Salaries 
NET COST TO FIRE DEPT. 



100,250. 

18,618. 

300. 

1,000. 

120,168. 
15,000. 

105,168. 



2,040. 
1,026. 

3,066. 



9,575. 



150. 



34,125. 
15,880. 

50,005. 



32,500. 



1,000. 



15,935. 



1,250. 



1,856,250. 

86,852. 

1. 

8,600. 

1,951,703. 

120,000. 
1,831,703. 



HEALTH AND SANITATION DEPARTMENT 

34. Salaries 75,918. 

35. Expenses 12,751. 

36. Out of State Expense 0. 

37. Outlay L 

TOTAL HEALTH DEPT. 88,670. 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 




38. Salaries 


457,240. 


39. Expenses 


265,001. 


40. Snow & Ice 


270,000. 


TOTAL HIGHWAY DEPT. 


992,241. 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

41. Expenses 

HYDRANT SERVICE 

42. Center 

43. North 

44. East 

45. South 

TOTAL HYDRANTS 

INSECT PEST CONTROL 

46. Superintendents Salary 

47. Expense 

TOTAL INSECT PEST CONTROL 

INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

48. Salaries 

49. Expenses 

50. Out of State Expenses 

TOTAL INSPECTION DEPT. 



LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 

56. Salaries 

57. Expenses 

58. Books & Periodicals 

59. Outlay 

Total Library Department 
Less State Funds Received 

NET COST LIBRARY DEPT. 

MODERATOR 

60. Moderator's Salary 

NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL 
HIGH SCHOOL 

28.67% assessment 

PARK DEPARTMENT 

62. Wages and Salaries 

63. Expenses 

64. Outlay 

TOTAL PARK DEPT. 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

65. Expenses 



1,000. 



43,500. 
18,300. 

7,000. 

5,500. 

74,300. 



1,250. 
10,735. 

11,985. 



101,648. 


13,056. 


200. 



114,904. 



838,061. 
212,967. 


INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 




1,051,028. 


51/52. Total Insurance Department 
LAW DEPARTMENT 


1,025,513. 


21,000. 
2,100. 
7,900. 


53. Town Counsel 

54. Legal Services 

55. Misc. Exp. & Assoc. Dues 


500. 

40,000. 

750. 


1,500. 


TOTAL LAW DEPT. 


41,250. 



254,321. 

40,892. 

72,000. 

L 

367,214. 

15,587. 

351,627. 



300. 



489,936. 



29,400. 

3,400. 

L 

32,801. 



650. 



24 



PLANNING BOARD 

66. Expenses 

67. Outlay 

TOTAL PLANNING BOARD 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

68. Salaries 

69. Expenses 

70. Chiefs Out of State 

71. Outlay 

72. Auxiliary Police 

73. Expense 

74. Outlay 

Total Police Department 
Appropriation from Revenue Sharing 



TOTAL REGISTRARS DF.PT. 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

85. Total School Department 



13,100. 
L 

13,101. 



1,604,670. 

181,901. 

1,050. 

1. 

3.070. 
400. 

1,791,092. 
120.000. 



NET COST POLICE DEPT. 


1.671.092. 


PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

75. Wages & Salaries 

76. Expenses 

77. Supervision fee 

78. Outlay 


35,792. 
36.500. 

5,500. 

2.000. 


TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS 


79.792. 


RECREATION COMMISSION 

79. Salaries 

80. Expenses 

81. Outlay 


11.510. 

18.375. 

500. 


TOTAL RECREATION 


30,385. 


REGISTRARS DEPARTMENT 

82. Wages and Salaries 

83. Expenses 

84. Outlay 


14.929. 

8.820. 

1. 



23.750. 



15,798,307. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

86. Salary 2.000. 

87. Expenses 300. 



67.232. 


22,920. 


1. 


750. 



TOTAL SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 2.300. 

SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT 

88. Salaries 

89. Expenses 

90. Outlay 

91 . Out of State Expense 

TOTAL SELECTMEN'S DEPT. 90.903. 

SEWER COMMISSION 

92. Professional Fees 12,500. 

93. Expenses 3.250. 

TOTAL SEWER COMMISSION 15.750. 

STREET LIGHTING 

94. Street Lighting 121,200. 

TOWN CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 

95. Expenses 500. 



TOWN CLERK DEPARTMENT 

96. Salaries 

97. Expenses 

98. Outlay 

TOTAL TOWN CLERK DEPT. 
TREASURER AND COLLECTOR 



65,551. 

4,730. 

L 

70,282. 



99. Salaries 


103,335. 


100. Expenses 


23,003. 


101. Outlay 


2,500. 


TOTAL TREASURER COLLECTOR DEPT. 


128,838. 


TREE WARDEN DEPARTMENT 




102. Salaries 


1,000. 


103. Elxpenses 


13,875. 


104. Outlay 


1. 


TOTAL TREE WARDEN DEPT. 


14,876. 


UNCLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT 




105. Ambulance Service 


1. 


106. Bus Transportation Subsidy 


1. 


107. Clerk of Committees 


1. 


108. Cultural Council 


100. 


109. Energy Committee 


1. 


1 10. Home Rule Advisory Committee 


1. 


111. Industrial Development Comm. 


1. 


112. Lowell Mental Health 


8,695. 


113. Memorial Day Elxpense 


1,000. 


1 14. N.M.A.C. Assessment 


8,016. 


115. Preliminary Project Studies 


5,000. 


116. Share, Inc. (Drug Rehab.) 


1. 


117. Sign Advisory Committee 


100. 


1 18. Town Clock Expense 


525. 


1 19. Town & Finance Comm. Reports 


6.000. 


120. Unemployment Benefits Due State 


30,000. 


121. Veterans Pensions Claims 


6,000. 


122. Historic District Comm. 


850. 


123. Cable T.V. Comm. 


2,250. 


124. Negotiated Clerical Salary Increases 


•10.000. 



TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED DEPTS. 



78,543. 



'The Finance Committee Chairman, George Ripsom ex- 
plained that certain monies would be transferred toother 
various wage line items of certain departments upon ap- 
proval of the Board of Selectmen. 

VARNEY PLAYGROUND 

125. Labor- Part Time 3,000. 

126. Expenses 1,999. 

127. Outlay L 

TOTAL VARNEY PLAYGROUND 5,000. 

VETERANS BENEFITS DEPARTMENT 

128. Wages & Salaries 

129. Expenses 

130. Outlay 

131. Cash & Material Grants 

TOTAL VETERANS BENEFITS DEPT. 

WASTE COLLECTION 

132. Expenses 

TOTAL WASTE COLLECTION 



32,931. 


3,575. 


130. 


55,000. 



91,636. 



447,678. 
447,678. 



25 



George Ripsom read the total budget figure of 
$25, 479, 795. 00 minus the transfer figures of $270, 587. 00 
for a net figure of $25,209,208.00. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on the net figure of $25,209,208.00, mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5. James R. Doukszewicz, Town 
Treasurer, moved that the Town vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1983; in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 
44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes as may be given 
for a period of less than one year in accordance with 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6. James R. Doukszewicz, Town 
Treasurer, moved that the Town vote to request the 
Department of Revenue, Division of Accounts of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to make an audit of all 
accounts in all departments in the Town of Chelmsford. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7. Selectman Claude Harvey mov- 
ed to withdraw this article. Motion carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 11. Selectman Claude Harvey 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $1,000.00 to pay reasonable hospital, medical and 
surgical, chiropractic, nursing, pharmaceutical, pro- 
sthetic and related expenses, and reasonable charges for 
podiatry pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 41, Sec- 
tion 100B, for certain retired police officers and fire- 
fighters as classified under Chapter 41, Section 100B of 
the Massachusetts General Laws, accepted by vote of the 
1979 Annual Town Meeting. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12. Selectman Claude Harvey 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $1 ,800.00 to be used to join or buy into Elder Ser- 
vices of Merrimack Valley, Inc. for the purpose of obtain- 
ing services for the care of the Town's Older Americans. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13. Selectman Claude Harvey 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $219,146.00 for the purpose of Chapter 90 Con- 
struction. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article, 
motion carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 8. Selectman Claude Harvey mov- 
ed that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$2,000.00 to match LEAA Federal Funds, for the pur- 
pose of providing mutual aid programs for the Police 
Department. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9. Selectman Claude Harvey mov- 
ed that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$723,800.00 to pay the Treasurer of the Middlesex Coun- 
ty Retirement System, the said amount being the Town's 
share of the pension expense and military service funds. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
Richard Codling spoke against the article, he felt that if 
the Town didn't send the money into the County, it 
would show a protest against the way the County govern- 
ment is treating Chelmsford. Selectman Ready explained 
that the monies named in this article was the Town 
employees retirement benefits, and that the County Com- 
missioners would not be hurt at all. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on the motion, motion carried. 



UNDER ARTICLE 14. Selectman Claude Harvey 
moved that the Town vote to appropriate and transfer 
from the Stabilization Fund the sum of $250,000.00 for 
the purpose of resurfacing portions of certain streets 
throughout the Town with Type I Bituminous Concrete, 
and other road materials. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. A 
%'s vote was required, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15. Selectman Claude Harvey 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $19,200.00 to alleviate certain drainage problems 
existing in the Town. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article, 
motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16. Selectman Claude Harvey 
moved that the Town vote to appropriate and transfer 
from the Stabilization Fund the sum of $45,000.00 for the 
purpose of purchasing five (5) new four door sedan police 
cruisers, said purchase to be made under the supervision 
of the Board of Selectmen. 



UNDER ARTICLE 10. George Ripsom of the Finance 
Committee, moved that the Town vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $200,000.00 to be used as a Reserve 
Fund at the discretion of the Finance Committee, as pro- 
vided in General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 



The Finance Committee recommended the article, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17. Selectman Claude Harvey 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $91 ,000.00 for the purchase of equipment for the 
Highway Department, such purchase to be made under 



26 



the supervision of the Board of Selectmen, as follows: 

a. one (1) Asphalt Paver 

b. one (1) Brush Chipper 

c. one (1) Compactor 

d. one (1) Sand Blaster 

e. one (1) Diesel Dump Truck 

f. one (1) Hydraulic Lift 

George Ripsom of the Finance Committee moved to 
amend the article to read "To Transfer from the 
Stabilization Fund a sum of S91 ,000." George Ripsom ex- 
plained the purpose of taking the monies from the 
Stabilization Fund. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 
on the motion to amend, motion carried. The Moderator 
then explained that a %'s vote was required, or an 
unanimous voice vote, voice vote was taken, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18. Selectman Claude Harvey 
moved that the Town vote to appropriate and transfer 
from the Stabilization Fund the sum of S28.000.00 for the 
purpose of completing the following repairs and replace- 
ments to Fire Department buildings and equipment, 
under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen: 

1. Roof repairs — Central Fire Station 

2. Replacement of fire alarm recorder with a digi- 
tized alarm box recorder 

3. Repair the body of Engine 3. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19. Selectman Claude Harvey 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to sell by good and sufficient bill of sale equip- 
ment presently being used by the Highway Department. 
Police Department and Fire Department. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 20. Gerald Hardy. Chairman of 
the Cemetery Commission, moved that the Town vote to 
transfer the sum of $10,000.00 from the sales of graves 
and lots to the Cemetery Improvement and Development 
Fund. 



d. Four (4) Mobil Radio Units 

e. One (1) Tire Changing Machine 

f. Repairs to Police Station Roof 

George Ripsom of the Finance Committee moved to 
amend the article to read "transfer from the Stabilization 
Fund the sum of 521,743.00. and delete line f. Repairs to 
Police Station roof. George Ripsom spoke about the arti- 
cle. A number of questions were raised and answered. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to 
amend, motion carried unanimously. The moderator at- 
tempted a voice vote, which had to be an unanimous 
vote, so the Moderator called the following tellers for- 
ward and a hand count was taken: (%'s vote required) 



David McLachlan 
William Drury 
Dorothy Lerer 



Sandra Kilburn 
Carol Stark 
Margaret Johnson 
Carolyn Fenn 



William O'Connell 
Edward Marshall 
Ruth Delaney 



Result of the hand count, Yes 108. No 31. motion car- 
ried. 

Spotsworth Bowers moved to adjourn the meeting. 
After a discussion Mr. Bowers said that he would be in 
favor of not adjourning the meeting, if the body was will- 
ing to stay. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion 
defeated. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the 
main motion as amended, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 22. Selectman Claude Harvey 
moved that the Town vote to accept the following men- 
tioned streets as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and 
shown by their reports and plans duly filed in the Office 
of the Town Clerk: 

Tanglewood Drive 
Driftwood Drive 
Downing Place 
Kimbcrly Court 
Regina Drive 
Delpha Lane 
Roy Clough Lane 

Providing all construction of same meets with the re- 
quirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to the 
withholding of any remaining bonds until such require- 
ments have been met. 



The Finance Committee recommended the article, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21. Selectman Claude Harvey 
moved that the Town vote to appropriate and transfer 
from the Stabilization Fund the sum of $26,743.00 for the 
purpose of completing the following repairs and purchas- 
ing the following equipment for the Police Department, 
said contracts to be made under the supervision of the 
Board of Selectmen. 

a. Two (2) Electric Typewriters 

b. One (1) Computer 

c. NEMLEC Update Radio Equipment 



The Finance Committee recommended the article, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 23. Brenda McDermott, Chair 
man of the Library Trustees moved that the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $17,100.00 for the pur- 
pose of automating the Chelmsford Public Library. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

Selectman Claude Harvey moved to adjourn the 
meeting until Monday evening May 16th at 7:30 PM. The 
Finance Committee was against the motion, the Moder- 
ator took a voice vote, motion defeated. 



27 



Town Counsel James Harrington moved to take articles 
33 & 34 out of order. The Finance Committee was against 
this. James Harrington moved to withdraw his motion to 
take the two articles out of order. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on the motion to withdraw, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 27. Town Counsel, James Harr- 
ington moved to table this article until a later date, due 
to the fact that a public hearing has not yet been held. 
The Finance Committee was in favor of the motion. The 
Moderator attempted a voice vote, which left the chair in 
doubt, the tellers came forward and a hand count was 
taken: Yes 97, No 33 motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 28. Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law, Article 
I — Administration and Procedure — Section 1400, 
Planning Board — Subsection 1424, Site Plan, by ad- 
ding thereto after subparagraph (f) the following: 

"(g) All site plans submitted to the Planning Board 
for review must be accompanied by a $200.00 fee, 
payable to the Town of Chelmsford, to cover engin- 
eering expenses incurred by the Planning Board 
during the Site Plan review." 

Planning Board Member Ann McCarthy read the 
Board's recommendation: The Planning Board held a 
public hearing on this article on April 13, 1983 and voted 
unanimously to recommend in favor of this article. Site 
Plan Review has become one of the main functions of the 
Planning Board over the past few years. Because of the 
complexity of some of the plans being submitted for the 
Board's review, advice and recommendations by the 
Planning Board Engineer are essential for the Board to 
make comprehensive decisions. We feel that the appli- 
cant, rather than the Town, should be responsible for the 
expenses incurred during this review process. We evalu- 
ated fees charged by surrounding towns and feel that a 
$200.00 fee would be applicable. 

Norman Lebrecque spoke against the article. Ronald 
Wetmore, Building Inspector spoke in favor and asked 
for support of the article. The Finance Committee was in 
favor of the article. A %'s vote is required, the motion 
carried, unanimously by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 29. Selectman Claude Harvey 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $6,400.00 for the purpose of preparing engineer- 
ing design and purchase and 1 installation of equipment to 
implement emergency dialing number 911 in the Town 
of Chelmsford. 

George Ripsom of the Finance Committee moved to 
amend the article as follows: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $6,400.00 for the purpose of conducting a 
feasibility study concerning implementation of emergen- 
cy dialing number E-91 1 in the Town of Chelmsford. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to 
amend, motion carried unanimously. The Moderator 



then asked for a voice vote on the main motion as amend- 
ed, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 30. James Brough moved that the 
Town vote to reject as unworkable the relocation plan 
prepared by the Massachusetts Civil Defense Agency in 
conjunction with the Federal Emergency Agency that 
calls for the evacuation of Chelmsford residents to Clare- 
mont, N.H. in the event of nuclear crisis. 

James Brough spoke briefly on the article. The Finance 
Committee recommended passage of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. 

Edward Hilliard, moved to take article 49 out of order. 
Motion defeated by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 31. Peter Dulchinos, Chairman of 
the Board of Health, moved that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $12,000.00 for the purpose of 
preparing engineering design plans for the closure of the 
Swain Road Landfill. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 32. Vice Chairman of the Board of 
Health, Paul McCarthy moved to table this article until a 
further time due to the possibility of other alternative 
funding. Motion carried, by voice vote to table this arti- 
cle. 

UNDER ARTICLE 33. Town Counsel James Harr- 
ington moved to withdraw this article. Motion carried, 
unanimously by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 34. Town Counsel James Harr- 
ington moved to withdraw this article. Motion carried, 
unanimously by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 35. Board of Health Chairman, 
Peter Dulchinos, moved that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $15,000.00 for the purpose of 
Mosquito Control, under the supervision of the Board of 
Health. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
Motion carried, unanimously. 

Selectmen Dennis Ready moved to adjourn this meet- 
ing after the completion of article 37, until Monday, May 
16th at 7:30 PM, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 36. Selectman Claude Harvey 
moved that the Town vote to amend the General By- 
Laws, Article IV— Financial Regulations— Section 2 — 
Contracts Exceeding $300.00, as follows: 

1. Delete Section 2 in its entirety, and insert therein 
the following: 



28 



"Section 2 — Contracts Exceeding $1,000.00 

a. Prior to the awarding of any contract or pur- 
chase of any materials, equipment or supplies, 
or engaging any services by any Board, Com- 
mittee, Officer or Department of the Town at a 
cost or estimated cost exceeding One Thousand 
Dollars ($1,000.00), the said Board, Commit- 
tee, Officer or Department shall secure quoted 
prices or bids from sufficient vendors of the 
goods or services to ensure the Town securing 
the lowest available price. The lowest quoted 
price or bid shall be accepted in every case, 
provided the vendor is financially responsible, 
and the bid is reasonable and complies with all 
conditions imposed by the awarding authority. 
In any event, the awarding authority may re- 
ject any or all bids if it is in the best interest of 
the Town to do so. 

b. No contract or purchase shall be so divided as 
to bring the amount below One Thousand 
Dollars (SI, 000. 00) for the purpose of evading 
the provisions of this By-Law. 

c. In the event the option of securing bids is 
elected, these bids shall be obtained either by 
publication in a newspaper circulated within 
the Town or by circular letter sent to a suffi- 
cient number of vendors to ensure fair competi- 
tion. 

d. The provisions of this By-Law shall not be ap- 
plicable in the event of an emergency requiring 
immediate action. 

e. Contracts for services of an official or profes- 
sional nature or services performed by munici- 
pal employees shall be exempt from the provi- 
sions of this By-Law. 

f. No contract having a value in excess of One 
Thousand Dollars ($1,000.00) shall be enforce- 
able against the Town unless it is in writing, 
signed by a majority of the Board, Committee, 
Officer or Department Head controlling the 
appropriation against which said obligation is 
incurred. Provided, however, a Board or Com- 
mittee may by vote delegate the authority to ex- 
ecute said contract to a municipal employee, 
who shall act in its name. 

g. Every Board, Committee, Officer and Depart- 
ment Head shall make a record of every such 
contract in a book which shall be a public 
record of the Town. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 37. Selectman Claude Harvey 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen, for consideration of S28.000.00 to convey by 
good and sufficient quitclaim deed, all right, title and in- 



terest to the Greater Lowell Council, Inc. — Boy Scouts of 
America and further authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
negotiate the terms of the sale, including reversionary 
rights, use reservations and the land area to be conveyed. 

Martin Ames spoke briefly about the article, stating 
that the Scouts have been presently occupying this build- 
ing for the last five years. The Finance Committee was in 
favor of the article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 
on the motion, motion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator then moved to adjourn the meeting per 
Selectman Ready's motion until Monday evening at 7:30 
PM May 16th, at the McCarthy Jr. High Gym. The meet- 
ing adjourned at 11:20 PM. 



Dennis McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 16, 1983 

The Moderator Dennis McHugh, called the meeting to 
order at 7:40 PM. 

Selectman Dennis Ready moved to take article 27 from 
the table, motion carried by voice vote. 

Moderator McHugh then explained to the Town Meet- 
ing body that this article pertains to Central Square and 
Vinal Square, and because he is a property owner in Cen- 
tral Square, he was removing himself as the Moderator at 
this time and was appointing Town Counsel James Harr- 
ington as Temporary Moderator for this article. Town 
Clerk Mary E. St.Hilaire swore Attorney Harrington in as 
Temporary Moderator. 

UNDER ARTICLE 27. Selectman Claude Harvey 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $50,000.00 for the purpose of completing Engin- 
eering Design and securing all necessary plans and speci- 
fications for implementation of Traffic Design at Central 
Square and Vinal Square all as set forth and limited by 
the recommendations contained in a report of SEA Con- 
sultants, Inc. dated May 16, 1983 to be presented at this 
Town Meeting and preliminary design plans entitled 
"figure 1, alternate 6, Central Square" and "figure 2, 
Vinal Square" said plans having been prepared by SEA 
Consultants, Inc. and presented at a public hearing on 
May 12, 1983 and to be presented at this Town Meeting 
and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to com- 
plete all applications and take all necessary steps to apply 
for Federal and State funds for the implementation of 
these plans and specifications; and further to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to enter any and all contracts for the 
implementation of these plans and specifications, and for 
the expenditure of all Federal and State funds available 
to the Town for said implementation: 



29 



The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
Selectman Ready presented a proposed traffic pattern for 
the two squares and explained why the Town needed to 
have this done. Normand Labrecque spoke against the ar- 
ticle. The Temporary Moderator attempted a voice vote, 
which left the chair in doubt, the following tellers came 
forward and a hand count was taken: 



Margaret Johnson 
Sandra Kilburn 
Carol Stark 
Jane Drury 



Dorothy Lerer Ruth Delaney 

William O'Connell David McLachlan 
Edward Marshall Pennryn Fitts 
William Drury 



Yes 160, No 210 motion defeated. 

Selectman Emerson moved to adjourn the meeting at 
this time due to the fact that a Special Town Meeting was 
scheduled for 8:00 PM and would reconvene at the end of 
the special. Motion carried, unanimously. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

May 16, 1983 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 8:10 
PM by the Moderator Dennis McHugh. Selectman Emer- 
son moved that the reading of the Constable's return of 
service and the posting of the warrant be waived. It was so 
voted, unanimously. Selectman Emerson then moved 
that the reading of the warrant be waived. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1. Selectman Claude Harvey mov- 
ed that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $50,000.00 
from the Sale of Real Estate Account for the purpose of 
construction of a dog pound. 

The Finance Committee was asked for their recom- 
mendation, and stated that they would give the recom- 
mendation after the Dog Pound Committee and the 
Board of Selectmen gave theirs. 

The Moderator also at this time recognized the pre- 
sence of a quorum. There were 480 voters present. 

Selectman Paul Hart spoke about the article, stating 
that the Board of Selectmen were not in favor of the arti- 
cle, and felt that the present location was where the 
pound should be kept. Thomas Christiano, Chairman of 
the Dog Pound Committee, explained that he and Robert 
Carlson, also a member of the committee, and a local vet 
would present to the Town Meeting body a presentation 
on why a new facility was necessary. Both committeemen 
explained that due to various health factors, as well as the 
savings that will occur over the years by having a Town 
owned facility. A discussion followed. Mr. Christiano 
moved to amend the article by adding after the last sen- 
tence, On Town owned property on North Road located 
behind the Police station. The Finance Committee sup- 
ported the article and the amendment. After more 
lengthy discussion, in which residents of the Chelmsford 



Village Condominiums spoke against such location, 
Rodger Currie moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator explained that if there was no need for any 
further discussion, then he would ask for a voice vote on 
the motion to amend, motion carried to amend, the arti- 
cle reads as follows: 

UNDER ARTICLE 1. Selectman Claude Harvey mov- 
ed that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $50,000.00 
from the Sale of Real Estate Account for the purpose of 
construction of a dog pound. On Town owned property 
on North Road located behind the Police Station. 

More discussion took place, Henrick Johnson moved 
the question. The Moderator asked for a voice vote mo- 
tion carried, unanimously to stop debate. The Moderator 
attempted a voice vote on the article which left the chair 
in doubt, the tellers came forward and a hand count was 
taken, Yes 276, No 137, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2. James Penuel, Petitioner of this 
article, moved that the Town vote to determine that there 
exists an emergency with respect to the housing of a 
substantial number of citizens in the Town of Chelms- 
ford, which emergency has been created by excessive, ab- 
normally high and unwarranted rent increases imposed 
by some owners of mobile home parks located therein; 
that unless mobile home park rents and eviction of 
tenants are regulated and controlled, such emergency 
will produce serious threats to the public health, safety, 
and general welfare of the citizens of said town, par- 
ticularly the elderly; that such emergency should be met 
immediately and with due regard for the rights and re- 
sponsibilities of the citizenry of the Town of Chelmsford 
by petitioning the Great and General Court of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts to enact special Legislation 
enabling the Town of Chelmsford to amend its code for 
the purpose of controlling rents and evictions in Mobile 
Home Parks. Such Legislation shall read as follows: 

Mobile Home Park Rent Control By-Law 

A By-Law establishing a MOBILE HOME PARK 
RENT CONTROL BOARD in the Town of 
Chelmsford, setting forth the powers and duties of 
the MOBILE HOME PARK RENT CONTROL 
BOARD, establishing standards and procedures: 

Section 1. This By-Law shall be known and may be 
cited as the "MOBILE HOME PARK RENT CON- 
TROL ACT." 

Section 2. Definitions: For the purposes of this By- 
Law, the following terms, phrases, words and their 
derivations shall have the meaning given herein, 
unless the context in which they are used clearly re- 
quires a different meaning. 

(1) "Rent Board" and "Board" mean the MOBILE 
HOME PARK RENT CONTROL BOARD as 
established herein. 



30 



(2) "Mobile Home" shall mean a dwelling unit 
built on a chassis and containing complete elec- 
trical, plumbing and sanitary facilities, and 
designed to be installed on a temporary or a 
permanent foundation for permanent living 
quarters. 

(3) "Mobile Home Park" means a park licensed by 
the Board of Health pursuant to Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 140, Section 32B. 

(4) "Rules and Regulations" means rules and regu- 
lations as promulgated by the BOARD. 

(5) "Shall" is mandatory; "May" is permissive. 

Section 3. Mobile Home Park Rent Control 
Board: There is hereby established a Mobile Home 
Park Rent Control Board consisting of five residents 
of the Town of Chelmsford to be appointed by the 
Board of Selectmen of the Town of Chelmsford. 

Section 4. Duties and Powers: 

(1) The BOARD shall set maximum rents, set 
minimum standards for use or occupancy of 
Mobile Home Parks and evictions of tenants 
therefrom; may require information of said 
owners relating to their parks under penalties 
of perjury. 

(2) The BOARD may make rules and regulations, 
sue and be sued, compel attendance of persons 
and the production of papers and information 
and issue appropriate orders which shall be 
binding on both the owner and tenants of such 
Mobile Home Park accommodations. 

Section 5. Standards for Adjusting Rents: 

(1) The BOARD may make individual or general 
adjustments, either upward or downward, as 
may be necessary to assure that tenants for 
Mobile Home Park accommodations are estab- 
lished on levels which yield to owners a fair net 
operating income for such units. 

(2) Fair net operating income shall be that income 
which will yield a return, after all reasonable 
operating expenses, on the fair market value of 
the property, equal to the debt service rate 
generally available from institutional first 
mortgage lenders or such other rates of return 
as the BOARD, on the basis of evidence pre- 
sented before it, deems more appropriate to the 
circumstances of the case. 

(3) Fair market value shall be the assessed valua- 
tion of the property or such other valuation as 
the BOARD, on the basis of evidence presented 
before it, deems more appropriate to the cir- 
cumstances of the case. 



(4) The BOARD may establish further standards 
and rules consistent with the foregoing. 

Section 6. Summary Process: The BOARD may 
regulate evictions of tenants at Mobile Home Parks 
and may issue orders which shall be a defense to an 
action of Summary Process for possession. 

Section 7. Review: 

(1) The BOARD and its actions shall be subject to 
the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 30 A, (Administrative Procedures Act) 
as if the BOARD were an agency of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts. 

(2) The District Court of Lowell shall have original 
jurisdiction, concurrently with the Superior 
Court, of all petitions for review brought pur- 
suant to Section Fourteen of Chapter 30A of 
the General Laws. 

(3) The Superior Court shall have jurisdiction to 
enforce the provisions of this By-Law, and may 
restrain by injunction violations thereof. 

Section 8. Maximum Rent: 

(1) The maximum rent of a Mobile Home Lot or 
Unit shall be the rent charged the occupant for 
the month six months prior to the acceptance 
of this Article by Town Meeting. If the rental 
unit was unoccupied at that time but was oc- 
cupied at any time prior to acceptance of this 
act. the maximum rent shall be the rent charg- 
ed therefore for the month closest to and prior 
to six months prior to the acceptance of this Ar- 
ticle by Town Meeting. 

(2) If the maximum rent is not otherwise estab- 
lished, it shall be established by the BOARD. 
Any maximum rent may be subsequently ad- 
justed under the provisions of Sections 4 and 5. 

Section 9. Penalties: Violations of this By-Law or 
any other of the Board shall be punishable by a fine 
of not more than One Thousand ($1,000.00) Dol- 
lars for any one offense. 

Section 10. Severability: If any provisions of this 
By-Law shall be held invalid, the validity of the re- 
mainder of this By-Law shall not be affected 
thereby. 

The Finance Committee was against the article. Select- 
man Emerson stated that the majority of the Board of 
Selectmen were against the article. James Penuel, peti- 
tioner of this article spoke in favor, and asked for voters 
support. He stated his reasons establishing the existence 
of an emergency as mentioned in the article. He also ex- 
plained why due to past and present situations this article 
was appearing before the Town Meeting body again. A 
number of residents of the trailer park spoke about why 



31 



the Town should declare an emergency, as they spoke in 
favor of the article. Pauline Taylor asked if her attorney 
could speak for her. Attorney London was not a Chelms- 
ford resident and the Moderator asked for a ruling from 
James Harrington, Town Counsel, concerning this factor. 
Town Counsel ruled that it was at the Moderator's discre- 
tion. The Moderator allowed Attorney London the 
privilege of addressing the Town Meeting body. Attorney 
London explained in lengthy detail why a number of 
residents in the Park, as well as the owners were against 
passage of this article. Attorney London stated a number 
of reasons why this article shouldn't pass. Richard Ster- 
ling, attorney for the petitioners commented on Attorney 
London's remarks, and stated the reasons why the peti- 
tioners need this bylaw. Selectmen Ready spoke in favor 
of the article. After a lengthy discussion, Cheryl Warshaf- 
sky moved the question. Motion carried unanimously by 
voice vote. The Moderator attempted a voice vote, which 
left the chair in doubt. The tellers came forward and a 
hand count was taken: Yes 233, No 144, the motion car- 
ried. 

Selectman Emerson moved to adjourn the Special 
Town Meeting at 10:30 PM, and to reconvene the ad- 
journed Annual Town Meeting. 



Dennis McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



UNDER ARTICLE 38. Attorney James M. Geary rep- 
resenting Raymond A. Carye, moved to withdraw this ar- 
ticle. Motion carried by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 39. Paul Canniff, Chairman of the 
Historic District Commission, moved that the Town vote 
to amend the General By-Laws, Article VII — Miscel- 
laneous— by adding the following section: 

"Section 9. Sodium Vapor Lamps Prohibited. 

The use of sodium vapor lamps for exterior lighting 
is prohibited within the boundaries of the 
Chelmsford Historic District." 

The Finance Committee recommended the article, 
motion carried. Halvar Peterson moved to take article 55 
out of order. Motion defeated by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 40. Selectman Claude Harvey 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen, for consideration to be determined, to convey 
all right, title and interest, if any, held by the Town in a 
certain parcel of land located on Perley Avenue, North 
Chelmsford, shown as Lot 53 on Assessor's Plat 14, con- 
taining 3,466 square feet of land, and more fully des- 
cribed in a deed recorded in Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds, Book 2224, Page 376. 

Evelyn Desmarais spoke about why she wanted to pur- 
chase the land. This land abuts her property. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously by voice vote. 



UNDER ARTICLE 41. Selectman Claude Harvey 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen, for consideration to be determined by ap- 
praisal and public bidding, to convey all right, title and 
interest, if any, held by the Town in a certain parcel of 
land located on Monmouth Street, Chelmsford, shown as 
Lot 33 on Assessor's Map 114, containing 15,000 square 
feet of land, and more fully described in a deed recorded 
in Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Book 
2539, Page 82. 

Patricia Kasila's land abuts this property, she was in- 
terested in purchasing the land in order to prevent any 
further development on the street. Harold Linstad 
wanted the Town to keep the land, because one of the in- 
terested parties wanted to put a house on the land and he 
felt that this would take away from the neighborhood. 
The Moderator attempted a voice vote on the article 
which left the chair in doubt, he then asked for a show of 
hands, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 42 Susan Eckhart, petitioner of 
this article moved that the Town vote to amend the Zon- 
ing By-Law, Article II — District Regulations — Section 
2300 — Use Regulations Schedule, by adding under Ac- 
cessory uses the following: 

Home Child Care 



RA 


RB 


RC 


RM 


CA 


BC 


CC 


IA 


IS 


RMH 


P 


P 


P 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


P 



Chairman of the Planning Board Henrick Johnson, 
read the Board's recommendation: The Planning Board 
held a public hearing on Article 42 on March 9, 1983, 
and voted unanimously to recommend in favor of this Ar- 
ticle. The Planning Board felt that the RMH zone was in- 
advertently excluded when the Home Child Care Amend- 
ment was passed at the 1982 Town Meeting. The Board 
agreed that if the Home Child Care provider in the 
Mobile Home Zone can meet the requirements in Section 
41 10A — "Special Regulations — Home Child Care" then 
they should be allowed this opportunity. 

4110A — Home Care providers shall be registered with 
and have obtained all applicable licenses from the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts Department of Children, 
and shall be in full compliance with all applicable Rules 
and Regulations promulgated by the Department of 
Children. Providers shall also comply with the provisions 
of the Life Safety code adopted by the National Fire Pro- 
tection Association. Section 10-9 Family Child Day Care 
Homes and any amendments or revisions thereto. Sec- 
tions4112, 4113, 4114, 4115, and 4116 of the Zoning By- 
Law shall apply to Home Day Care Homes. 

Barry Warshafsky spoke in favor of the article. At- 
torney Edward London, spoke for Anthony Cali and 
spoke against the article. After a lengthy discussion, 
Marion Wilson moved the question to stop debate, the 
Moderator asked if there was any further need of dis- 
cussion, hearing none he asked for a voice vote on this ar- 
ticle, which left the chair in doubt, the tellers came for- 
ward and a hand count was taken. A %'s vote is required 
Yes 167, No 52, motion carried. 



32 



Selectman Dennis Ready moved to reconsider article 
27. Moderator Dennis McHugh had Town Counsel James 
Harrington become the Temporary Moderator, due to 
Mr. McHugh owning property in Chelmsford Square. 
Selectman Ready asked for reconsideration in order to 
amend the article to read $25,000.00 instead of 
$50,000.00. After a discussion the Temporary Moderator 
asked for a voice vote on the motion to reconsider, motion 
defeated. Dennis McHugh assumed the position of 
Moderator. 

UNDER ARTICLE 43. Selectman Emerson moved to 
withdraw this article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

Marion Wilson moved to adjourn the meeting, until 
Monday, May 23rd. The Finance Committee was against 
the motion. The Board of Selectmen were in favor. A dis- 
cussion took place, and the Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, which left the chair in doubt, a show of hands was 
taken, motion carried. The meeting adjourned at 11:10 
PM, until Monday, May 23, 1983. and the location will 
be at the McCarthy Jr. High Gym. 



Dennis McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 23, 1983 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:35 PM, by the Moderator Dennis McHugh. 
There were 207 voters present. 

John Emerson moved to take article 32 from the table, 
motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 32. Chairman of the Board of 
Health, Peter Dulchinos. moved that the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $2,500.00 for the pur- 
pose of implementing Article X — "Control and Manage- 
ment of Hazardous Materials," to be supervised by the 
Chelmsford Board of Health. 

John Emerson, Health Inspector explained the article 
and asked for the support of the Town Meeting body. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 44. The Finance Committee voted 
to withdraw this article, and the Board of Selectmen 
agreed. However, the Moderator pointed out that the 
motion was originally the Board of Selectmen's and that 
they would have to be the party to withdraw. Selectman 
Claude Harvey moved to withdraw the article. The 
Finance committee agreed with the motion. Motion car- 
ried, by voice vote, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 45. Frederick H. Reid, Fire Chief, 
moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 148, Section 26G, 
an act further regulating the installation of automatic 
sprinkler systems. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. Mo- 
tion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 46. Deputy Chief James Sousa, of 
the Fire Department moved to have this article with- 
drawn. Presently there is new legislation with better wor- 
ding, and the Fire Department would rather wait and 
adopt that particular law if passed. The Finance Com- 
mittee supported this motion. Motion carried, unani- 
mously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 47. Samuel Poulten, Chairman of 
the School Committee moved that the Town vote to 
transfer from available funds the sum of $76,663.00 for 
the purpose of School Building Capital Improvements 
and Preservation and authorize the School Committee to 
proceed with said project and to execute all necessary and 
proper contracts and agreements in respect thereto and 
to do all other acts necessary. 

The motion carried, by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 48. Samuel Poulten, Chairman of 
the School Committee, moved to table this article until 
after article 56. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 49. Samuel Poulten, Chairman of 
the School Committee, moved that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $5.00 for the purpose of pro- 
viding annual compensation in the amount of $1.00 for 
each member of the School Committee. 

The Finance Committee was against the article. Ed- 
ward Hilliard. spoke against the article. Samuel Poulton 
spoke about the article and explained the purpose of the 
law. After a lengthy discussion, the Moderator asked for a 
voice vote, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 50. Samuel Poulten, Chairman of 
the School Committee, moved that the Town vote to ap- 
propriate and transfer from the Stabilization Fund the 
sum of $22,000.00 for the purpose of purchasing a 12 foot 
Cargo Van for the School Department. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Moderator attempted a voice vote, which left the 
chair in doubt, the following tellers came forward and a 
hand count was taken: 



Edward Marshall 
Carol Stark 
Jim McBride 



Sandra Kilburn 
Clem McCarthy 
Dorothy Lerer 
David McLachlan 



William O'Connell 
Betty McCarthy 
Margaret Johnson 



Yes 135, No 23 a %'s vote needed, motion carried. 



33 



UNDER ARTICLE 51. Samuel Poulten, Chairman of 
the School Committee moved to withdraw this article. 
Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 52. The Finance Committee 
recommended this article, and asked for support from 
the Town Meeting body. John Emerson, Chairman of the 
Sewer Commission explained the purpose of the article. 
After much discussion, in which a lot of residents spoke 
against the article, Harry Foster moved to amend the ar- 
ticle, by deleting the words every three years and substitu- 
ting when necessary. After more lengthy discussion, Ed- 
ward Marshall moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator explained that if there was no more need for 
discussion, then he would ask for a voice vote on the mo- 
tion to amend. Hearing none, he asked for the voice vote, 
motion defeated. The Town Meeting body questioned 
the voice vote, the Moderator asked for a show of hands 
motion carried, to amend. The Moderator then asked for 
a voice vote on the article as amended, motion carried. 
Article 52 reads as follows: 

John Emerson, Chairman of the Sewer Commission, 
moved that the Town vote to amend the General By- 
Laws, Article VIII — Waste Disposal — by adding Section 
5 as follows: 

"Section 5. Maintenance of Wastewater and 
Sewage Disposal Systems. 

To ensure compliance with the requirements of the 
Board of Health, every owner, agent or occupant of 
premises on which there is a private wastewater or 
sewage disposal system shall keep such system in 
proper operational order, and shall provide a 
reasonable means of access for inspection and pum- 
ping. Residential properties shall have such system 
pumped when necessary. All commercial, indus- 
trial and other non-residential establishments shall 
have their system pumped every two (2) years. Such 
pumping shall be made by private operators duly 
licensed by the Board of Health. More frequent 
pumpings may be ordered as deemed necessary by 
the Board of Health for the proper operation of the 
subsurface septic system." 

UNDER ARTICLE 53. John Emerson, Chairman of 
the Sewer Commission, moved that the Town vote to 
amend the General By-Laws, Article VIII — Waste Dis- 
posal—by adding Section 6 as follows: 

"Section 6. Connection to Public Sewer. 

The owners of all dwellings, buildings and other 
structures used for human occupancy, employ- 
ment, recreation or other related use abutting on 
any public or private way, alley or right-of-way in 
which there is now located or may be located a 
public sanitary sewer of the Town, shall be required 
at their expense to install suitable toilet facilities 
therein, and to connect such facilities directly with 
the public sewer in accordance with Sewer Commis- 
sion Regulations, within (1) year from the date of 



official notice by the Sewer Commission. Provided, 
however, that the Board of Health may order any 
person to connect with the public sewer at any time 
if deemed to be in the best interest of the Town 
upon giving thirty (30) days notice to do so." 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
Barbara Langworthy, of the League of Women Voters 
also supported the article. A discussion followed, Dennis 
Ready moved the question, to stop debate. The Moder- 
ator asked if there was any need for further debate, hear- 
ing none he asked for a voice vote on the article, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 54. John Emerson, Chairman of 
the Sewer Commission, moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Sewer Commission to negotiate and execute 
an Agreement with the City of Lowell and other munici- 
palities for treatment and disposal of wastewater and sep- 
tage from the Town of Chelmsford. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 55. Claude Harvey, Chairman of 
the Board of Selectmen, moved to withdraw this article. 
The Finance Committee was in favor of this motion. 
Ruth Delaney, Chairman of the Housing Authority said 
that her Board was also in favor of the motion. Selectman 
Harvey said that it was a majority vote of his board that 
voted to withdraw. Selectman Ready stated that he was 
against this motion, he felt that the Town Meeting body 
should have the opportunity to discuss and vote on the ar- 
ticle. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion 
to withdraw, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 56. George Ripsom, Chairman of 
the Finance Committee moved that the Town vote to in- 
struct the Board of Assessors is issue a sum not to exceed 
$799,593.00 from Free Cash in the Treasury for the 
reduction of the Tax Rate for the current fiscal period. 

Motion carried, unanimously. 

Chairman of the School Committee, Samuel Poulten, 
moved to take article 48 from the table. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 48. Superintendent of the School 
Department, Alan Bradshaw, moved to amend the figure 
of $375,037.00 to $358,037. Mr. Bradshaw presented a 
list showing where the monies were to be spent and the 
amounts required. The Finance Committee moved to 
amend the amendment by inserting the figure of $293,- 
037.00. The Finance Committee also stated where the 
monies were to be spent and the amounts required. After 
a lengthy discussion, the Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, which left the chair in doubt, a show of hands still 
left the chair in doubt. The tellers came forward and a 
hand count was taken: Yes 70, No 81, the Finance Com- 
mittee's motion was defeated. More discussion followed, 
and the Moderator asked for a voice vote on Mr. Brad- 
shaw's motion to amend with the figure of $358,037.00, 



34 



motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote on the main motion as amended, motion car- 
ried unanimously. Article 48 reads as follows: 

Samuel Poulton, Chairman of the School Committee, 
moved that the Town borrow the sum of 5358,037.00 for 
the purpose of School Building Capital Improvements 
and Preservation and authorize the School Committee to 
proceed with said project and to execute all necessary and 
proper contracts and agreements in respect thereto, and 
to do all other acts necessary: 

Ducting and ventilating of High School 40,000.00 

McCarthy Junior High Roof Repair 44,700.00 

Parker Roof Repairs 135,000.00 
Asbestos removal and refurbishing 

McCarthy Jr. High 150,000.00 
Resurface High School Tennis Courts (6) 

Double course surface — 5 yr. warranty 65,000.00 

Minus trapped energy money from 

1982-83 borrowed -76,663.00 

Total requested borrowing 358,037.00 

William Keohane moved to adjourn the meeting Sine 
die, motion carried. The meeting adjourned at 9:55 PM. 



Dennis McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 



items to fund approved wage and salary increases and ex- 
pense allocations in the following departmental accounts: 

Accounting Department 

Assessor's Department 

Cemetary Department 

Council on Aging 

Fire Department 

Health Department 

Highway Department 

Inspection Department 

Library Department 

Park Department 

Public Buildings Department 

Registrar's Department 

Selectmen's Department 

Town Aide 

Town Clerk's Department 

Treasurer /Collector's Department 

Veteran's Benefits Department 

and any other departmental budget recommended by the 
Board of Selectmen at Town Meeting; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to reduce the 
sum of money authorized to be borrowed pursuant to Ar- 
ticle 48 of the 1983 Annual Town Meeting by a certain 
sum of money: or act in relation thereto. 

School of Department 



December 12, 1983 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High 
School Gymnasium on Monday evening, the twelfth day 
of December, 1983, at 7:30 o'clock P.M., then and there 
to act upon the following Articles. Viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of purchasing voting 
machines; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to the appropriate salary and expense line 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of paying bills from a 
previous fiscal year; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to grant 
longevity benefits to all permanent employees of the 
Highway Department in accordance with a schedule to be 
presented at Town Meeting; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws by adding the following as the "Mobile 
Home Park Rent Contol By-Law" and further to find and 
vote to declare a public emergency in the Town of 
Chelmsford with respect to housing as contained in Sec- 
tion 1 of said By-Law: 

Section 1. The Town of Chelmsford finds and de- 
clares that a public emergency exists in the Town of 
Chelmsford with respect to the housing of a sub- 
stantial number of citizens of the Town, which 
emergency has been created by excessive, abnor- 
mally high and unwarranted rental increases im- 
posed by some owners of mobile home parks located 
therein; that unless mobile home park rents and 



35 



eviction of tenants are regulated and controlled, 
such emergency and the further inflationary pres- 
sures resulting therefrom will produce serious 
threats to the public health, safety and general 
welfare of the citizens of Chelmsford, particularly 
the elderly; that such emergency should be met by 
the Commonwealth immediately and with due 
regard for the rights and responsibilities of the 
Town of Chelmsford by enabling the Town of 
Chelmsford to amend its code for the purpose of 
controlling rents and evictions in mobile home 
parks to enact a by-law to establish a mobile home 
park rent control board in said Town, said by-law 
shall set forth the powers and duties of such board 
and which shall establish standards and pro- 
cedures. 

Section 2 : The Town of Chelmsford hereby adopts 
the following nine sections as a Town by-law which 
shall be known and may be cited as the "Mobile 
Home Rent Control By-Law." 

Section 3: For the purpose of this by-law, the 
following terms, phrases, words and their deriva- 
tions shall have the meaning given herein, unless 
the context in which they are used clearly requires a 
different meaning. 

(1) "Rent Board" and "Board" means the Mobile 
Home Park Rent Control Board as established 
herein. 



(2) The Board may make rules and regulations, 
sue and be sued, compel attendance of persons 
and the production of papers and information, 
and issue appropriate orders which shall be 
binding on both the owner and tenants of such 
mobile home park accommodations. 

Section 6: 

(1) The Board may make individual or general ad- 
justments, either upward or downward, as may 
be necessary to assure that tenants for mobile 
home park accommodations are established on 
levels which yield to owners a fair net operating 
income for such units. 

(2) Fair net operating income shall be that income 
which will yield a return, after all reasonable 
operating expenses, on the fair market value of 
the property, equal to the debt service rate 
generally available from institutional first mor- 
tgage lenders or such other rates of return as 
the Board, on the basis of evidence presented 
before it, deemed more appropriate to the cir- 
cumstances of the case. 

(3) Fair market value shall be the assessed valua- 
tion of the property or such other valuation as 
the Board, on the basis of evidence presented 
before it, deemd more appropriate to the cir- 
cumstances of the case. 



(2) "Mobile Home" shall mean a dwelling unit 
built on a chassis and containing complete elec- 
trical, plumbing and sanitary facilities, and de- 
signed to be installed on a temporary or a per- 
manent foundation for permanent living quar- 
ters. 

(3) "Mobile Home Park" means a park licensed by 
the Board of Health pursuant to Section 
Thirty-Two B of Chapter One Hundred and 
Forty of the General Laws. 

(4) "Rules and Regulations" means rules and regu- 
lations as promulgated by the Board. 



(4) The Board may establish further standards of 
rules consistent with the foregoing. 

Section 7: The Board may regulate evictions of 
tenants of mobile home parks and may issue orders 
which shall be a defense to an action of summary 
process for possession. 

Section 8: 

(1) The Board and its actions shall be subject to 
the provisions of Chapter Thirty A of the 
General Laws as if the Board were an agency of 
the Commonwealth. 



(5) "Shall" is mandatory; "May" is permissive. 

Section 4: There is hereby established a mobile 
home park rent control board consisting of five 
residents of the Town of Chelmsford to be ap- 
pointed by the Board of Selectmen of the Town of 
Chelmsford. 

Section 5: 

(1) The Board shall set maximum rents, set mini- 
mum standards for use or occupancy of mobile 
home parks and evictions of tenants therefrom; 
may require information of said owners 
relating to their parks under the penalties of 
perjury. 



(2) The District Court of Lowell shall have original 
jurisdiction, concurrently with the Superior 
Court, of all petitions for review brought pur- 
suant to Section Fourteen of Chapter Thirty A 
of the General Laws. 

(3) The Superior Court shall have jurisdiction to 
enforce the provisions of this by-law, and may 
restrain by injunction violations thereof. 

Section 9: 

(1) The maximum rent of a mobile home lot or 
unit shall be the rent charged the occupant for 
the month six months prior to the acceptance 
of this by-law by Town Meeting. If the rental 



36 



unit was unoccupied at that time but was oc- 
cupied at any time prior to acceptance of this 
act, the maximum rent shall be the rent charg- 
ed therefor, or the month closest to and prior to 
six months prior to the acceptance of this by- 
law by Town Meeting. 

(2) If the maximum rent is not otherwise establish- 
ed, it shall be established by the Board. Any 
maximum rent may be subsequently adjusted 
under the provisions of Sections Five and Six. 

Section 10: Violations of this by-law or any order of 
the board shall be punishable by a fine of not more 
than one thousand dollars for any one offense. 

Section 11: If any provisions of this by-law shall be 
held invalid, the validity of the remainder of this 
by-law shall not be affected thereby; 



or act in relation thereto. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

December 12, 1983 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 8:05 
PM by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh, who recog- 
nized the presence of a quorum. Selectman Harvey mov- 
ed that the reading of the Constable's return of service 
and the posting of the warrant be waived. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. Selectman Harvey then moved that 
the reading of the entire warrant be waived. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. Normand LaBrecque questioned the 
presence of a quorum. The Moderator then called for the 
following tellers to come forward and conduct a hand 
count to determine the number of registered voters in at- 
tendance: 



Petition 



Sandra Kilburn Bruce Gullion 
Ruth Delaney Dorothy Lerer 

Carl Olsson Myra Silver 

William O'Conncll 



Margaret Johnson 
Richard Burtt 
Carol Gullion 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given unto our hands this twenty-fifth day of Novem- 
ber, A.D. 1983. 

Claude A. Harvey, Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Vice Chairman 

Bradford O. Emerson, Clerk 

Paul C. Hart 

Dennis J. Ready 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



November 28. 1983 



Pursuant to the within Warrant. I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: The New Town Office Building Gym; North Con- 
gregational Church Hall; Parker School Band Room: 
East Chelmsford School; Byam School Cafctorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; North Congregational 
Church Hall: McCarthy Junior High School. Small Gym- 
nasium; South Row School Auditorium; South Row Schol 
Auditorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; McCarthy 
Junior High School. Small Gymnasium; fourteen days at 
least before the time appointed for holding the meeting 
aforesaid. 

William E. Spcnce 
Constable of Chelmsford 

A True Copy Attest, 

William E. Spence, Constable of Chelmsford 



The result of the hand count: 297 voters present. 

John Verrill then moved that another hand count be 
taken due to the fact that more voters had arrived after 
the first hand count. The tellers came forward: another 
hand count was taken. The result was: 304 voters present, 
the Special Town Meeting continued. Town By-Law re- 
quires 300 present to conduct a meeting. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Harvey, moved that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$40,790.00 for the purpose of purchasing electronic 
voting machines, or equipment. 

The Finance Committee was in favor of the article. 
Motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Harvey moved that 
the Town vote to transfer from Free Cash the sum of 
$43,511.00 and transfer to the following salary and ex- 
pense line items in the indicated specific amounts to fund 
approved wage and salary increases and expense alloca- 
tions in the following departmental accounts: 



Accounting Department: 

Line Item #1 . Wages and Salaries 

Board of Appeals: 
Line Item #6: Expense 

Assessor's Department: 
Line Item #7: Salaries 

Cemetery Department: 
Line Item #11: Salaries 

Conservation Commission: 
Line Item #17: Expense 



$ 2,550.00 



58.00 



2,268.00 



735.00 



87.00 



37 



Council On Aging/Town Aide: 
Line Item #19: Salaries 

Dog Officer Department: 

Line Item #23. Wages and Salaries 

Fire Department: 
Line Item #30. Salaries 
Line Item #31. Expense 

Highway Department: 
Line Item #38. Salaries 

Inspection Department: 
Line Item #48. Salaries 

Library Department: 
Line Item #56. Salaries 

Park Department: 

Line Item #62. Wages and Salaries 

Police Department: 
Line Item #68. Salaries 

Public Buildings Department: 

Line Item #75. Wages and Salaries 

Registrar's Department: 

Line Item #82. Wages and Salaries 

Selectmen's Department: 
Line Item #88. Salaries 

Town Clerk's Department: 
Line Item #96. Salaries 

Treasurer/Collector Department: 
Line Item #99. Salaries 

Veteran's Benefits Department: 
Line Item #128. Wages and Salaries 

TOTAL 



893.00 



518.00 



2,044.00 
9,050.00 



1,802.00 



2,196.00 



6,347.00 



721.00 



6,349.00 



782.00 



338.00 



1,795.00 



1,606.00 



2,539.00 



833.00 
$43,511.00 



The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Selectman Harvey moved that 
the Town vote to grant longevity benefits to all union 
employees of the Highway Department effective July 1 , 
1984, in accordance with the following schedule: 

After 5 years of employment, 1 V6 % of base; 
After 10 years of employment, 3% of base; 
After 15 years of employment, 4V£% of base; 
After 20 years of employment, 6% of base; 

The Finance Committee was not in favor of this article. 
A number of voters spoke against the article. Selectman 
Harvey spoke in favor. Treasurer James Doukszewicz, ex- 
plained where the monies would come from. After a 
lengthy discussion, Selectmen made a motion to move the 
question. The Moderator asked if there was a need for 
any further discussion, if not then he would just ask for a 
voice vote on the article. A voice vote was asked for on the 
article, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 The Finance Committee was not 
in favor of the article. Pauline Taylor questioned the 
quorum. The tellers came forward and a hand count was 
taken. There were 286 voters present. Cheryl Warshafsky 
moved for a 15 minute recess, the Moderator asked for a 
voice vote on the motion, motion carried. The meeting 
recessed at 8:55 PM. 

The Moderator called the meeting back to order at 
9:10 PM. Pauline Taylor questioned the quorum. The 
tellers came forward and a hand count was taken. There 
were 276 voters present. Carol Levine moved to adjourn 
the meeting until Monday, January 9th, 1984, at 7:30 PM 
at the McCarthy Jr. High Auditorium. Motion carried by 
voice vote. The meeting adjourned at 9:20 PM. 



Dennis McHugh 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
Norman LaBrecque spoke against the article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. 



UNDER ARTICLE 3 Chairman of the School Com- 
mittee, Samuel Poulten moved that the town vote to 
reduce the sum of money authorized to be borrowed pur- 
suant to Article 48 of the 1983 Annual Town Meeting by 
the amount of $65,000.00, reducing the total sum 
authorized to be borrowed pursuant to said Article 48 to 
$293,037.00. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Harvey moved that 
the Town vote to transfer from Overlay Surplus Reserve 
the sum of $642.00 for the purpose of paying bills from a 
previous fiscal year. 



38 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Janet Lombard, Chairman 
Ruth K. Delaney James McBride 

Diane M. Phillips, Assistant to the Assessors 
Evelyn M. Philbrook, Principal Clerk 

The hectic pace which began with the revaluation pro- 
ject in 1982 continued in 1983. Final tax bills based on 
the new real estate values were sent out in May and 
resulted in 350 appeals by taxpayers, which represents 
approximately three percent of the properties in town. 
The average revaluation usually produces anywhere from 
ten to fifteen percent appeals. In addition, there was a 
fifty percent increase in building permit activity, a local 
reflection of the improved economy and Chelmsford's 
prominent place in the high technology industry in Mass- 
achusetts. The year brought an eighty-two percent in- 
crease in permits for new buildings, a doubling of com- 
mercial and industrial permits, two new condominium 
developments, and the relocation of a number of dwell- 
ings as a result of industrial development in the Billerica 
Road area. 

Between fiscal 1982 and fiscal 1983, the total assessed 
value of the town increased from $291,837,245 to 
$812,528,705 (278%) which dramatically illustrates the 
increase in property values since the last revaluation in 
1972. The effective tax rate, however, dropped from 
$29.20 per thousand to $23.50 per thousand. Although 
the law now permits residential, commercial and in- 
dustrial, and personal property to be taxed at different 
rates, the Board of Selectmen after holding a public hear- 
ing chose to tax all property at the same rate. $20.50 per 
thousand dollars of valuation. 

There are now sixteen properties classified as farms, 
four as forest land and one as recreational land under 
state law (G.L.C. Chapters 61. 61 A. and 61 B). This, too, 
is a fallout from the higher land values resulting from the 
revaluation. The law allows land to be valued at its cur- 
rent use rather than its potential market value if the 
owner agrees not to develop it for a period of ten years or 
to pay roll-back taxes if he does. 

The assessors office has not yet implemented in-house 
computer capability for maintaining property values and 
updating them every three years as required by slate law. 
The Board is, however, currently evaluating the available 
options and in-house computerization is high on the list 
of priorities. In light of the three year update cycle, there 
is an ongoing reinspection of all taxable real estate at the 
rate of one third a year. This will be a continuous process 
to circumvent the expense of another massive revaluation 
project in another three years. 

In the midst of the furor, both Ruth Delaney and 
James McBride were re-elected to their positions on the 
Board. This year, also, Evelyn Philbrook was promoted 
to principal clerk, a much-overdue recognition of her 
twenty-plus years contribution to the efficient operation 
of this office — for this we are truly grateful. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Janet Lombard. Chairman 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

COMMISSION MEMBERS 

Mrs. Charlotte P. DeWolf 

Dr. Everett V. Olsen 

Mr. Gerald L. Hardy 
Cemetery Superintendent 
Mr. George E. Baxendale 

In 1983 the total number of burials in the Chelmsford 
cemeteries was 122. 74 in Pine Ridge. 31 in Fairview, 7 in 
West Chelmsford. 8 in Heart Pond, 1 in Riverside and 1 
in Forefathers. The total number of lots sold was 65. 

The Cemetery Commission is pleased to have this op- 
portunity to report to the citizens of Chelmsford on those 
activities in the various town cemeteries considered par- 
ticularly noteworthy. 

1. Fairview Cemetery.... Utilizing Cemetery and 
Highway Department personnel, on an overtime basis, 
the Cemetery Department cleared and prepared about 
three acres at the rear of this cemetery for future burial 
uses. The Town Engineer surveyed and staked out the 
area being cleared, marked certain trees to be kept, stak- 
ed out roadways in the new area and provided grades for 
an extension of a drainage line in the cemetery. Using 
these lines and levels, the Town's own employees did an 
outstanding job in developing this new area. In addition 
the department had new gates installed at the entrances 
where they were needed and restored and painted others. 
The new area in this cemetery should provide about 2000 
additional burial lots for sale to the citizens of 
Chelmsford. The 1984 plans call for developing an 
equivalent area in the other side of the cemetery to main- 
tain the beauty and appearance of the entire area. 

All of this work was accomplished with Cemetery 
Department funds not appropriated funds. This work 
will NOT be reflected on anyone's tax bill. 

2. Forefathers Cemetery This cemetery is the oldest 

cemetery in town and is one of particular historical im- 
portance. In 1983 one of the older tombs in this cemetery 
was repaired to maintain it properly and to preserve its 
antiquity. Together with the urging, advice, and assist- 
ance of the Chelmsford Historical Commission the 
Cemetery Department planted many shrubs considered 
important in marking out and maintaining the historical 
character of this burial ground. 

3. Pine Ridge Cemetery Following the develop- 
ment, in prior years, of an area close to the main en- 
trance to this cemetery, the Cemetery Department open- 
ed this same area (behind the flagpole) for sale to the 
citizens of Chelmsford. This provides access to new burial 
lots approximating 2000 for use by the citizens of our 
town. 

4. Riverside Cemetery.... Activities in this cemetery, 
also one of the older ones, centered about the repair and 
painting of certain fence sections. In 1984 the repair and 
paving of a roadway at the rear of this cemetery is an ab- 



39 



solute necessity in order to prevent further deterioration 
and erosion of the lots bordering on this access way. 

5. Heart Pond Cemetery The activities of the staff 

in this cemetery were limited to a general repair of fences 
— primarily replacement of broken or missing pickets. 

6. West Chelmsford Cemetery Fence repair and 

replacement, together with certain fence painting, were 
the chief activities in this cemetery. 

The Cemetery Commission is pleased to report that two 
young men, candidates for Eagle Scout badges, volun- 
teered to repair and improve some of the cemetery fences. 
Joel C. Conner was responsible for the improvements in 
the fences at the West Chelmsford Cemetery, and Rodney 
D. Davis provided for the improvements in the fence at 
the Riverside Cemetery. These young men have the 
thanks and appreciation not only of the Cemetery 
Department but of the citizens of Chelmsford for their 
eagerness and abilities to provide needed public service to 
our town. They each merit our sincere thanks. 

The year 1983 has brought much in the way of im- 
provements to our cemeteries. The year 1984 should 
reflect a continuation of the progress and redevelopment 
of these burial areas. 

In 1984 plans call for continuing the work of expansion 
and improvement in Fairview Cemetery; plans also call 
for continued restoration of fences and other cemetery 
protective devices and areas for the betterment of the 
cemeteries as well as improvements in appearance and 
presentability. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



Chairman 

Vice-Chairman 

Clerk 



Peter Dulchinos 

Paul McCarthy 

PaulCanniffD.D.S. 



Health Department Personnel 

Director of Public Health Richard J. Day 

Health Inspector John P. Emerson, Jr. 

Secretary Diana L. Wright 

Town Nurse Judith Dunigan 

Physician Michael A. Gilchrist M.D. 

Septage and Wastewater Abatement Program 

In 1983 the Septage and Wastewater Abatement Pro- 
gram continued its effort to clean up our waterways. The 
Board of Health has been running an extensive dye 
testing and water sampling program and positive results 
are being seen. More than two-hundred and fifty tests 
have been performed by the Board of Health along with 
the issuance of one-hundred forty-nine septic system per- 
mits (repair) and one-hundred twenty-three septic system 
permits (new). 



Administration and Management 

Income for various services and permits is listed below: 

Percolation tests— 135 $3,375 

DeepTests-255 6,375 

Sewage Repair Permits — 149 2,235 

Sewage Construction Permits— 123 4,244 

Miscellaneous Licenses and Fees 5,541 

Trailer Park Fees 20 , 240 



Total 



$42,010 



Rabies Clinic 

Administered by Martin Gruber, D.V.M., a total of 
one-hundred sixty-eight dogs were innoculated against 
rabies. 

Complaint and Inspectional Services 

During 1983 four inspections were made of nursing 
homes; twenty-six inspections made for Chapter II Hous- 
ing; school inspections eighteen; complaints received and 
checked three-hundred five; stable inspections six; Camp 
Paul inspections (new construction), fourteen times; 
bathing beaches, thirty inspections; Certify International 
Travel Vaccination Books, thirteen; restaurants and 
retail food store inspections, one-hundred seventy-eight. 

Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewater 

The Board of Health, because of the new local and 
state laws and public awareness in the areas of hazardous 
waste disposal, has been called upon to coordinate all 
phases of hazardous waste activities. 

Mr. Richard J. Day (Director of Public Health) has 
been appointed by the Board of Selectmen to be Hazar- 
dous Waste Coordinator for this town between the State 
and Federal agencies, business community and the 
general public. 

Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewaters has 
opened up a whole new area to be monitored. It is the 
goal of the Board of Health, along with other town 
departments, to keep abreast of all current changes and 
updates in the handling and disposal of all toxic wastes 
and to supersede any State or Federal Standards where it 
would best serve to protect this community. 

Communicable Disease Program 

Part of the duties of the Public Health Nurse include 
follow-up on approximately forty-three communicable 
diseases as mandated by the Massachusetts Department 
of Public Health. An epidemiological investigation is 
undertaken by the Town Nurse and the report is submit- 
ted to the Department of Public Health. Follow-up phone 
calls or home visits are then made as necessary. Reports 
on the following diseases were completed during 1983: 



Hepatitis 

Meningitis 

Meningo Encephalitis 

Mumps 

Pertussis 

Rubella (German Measles) 

Rubeola (Measles) 

Salmonella 




1 





11 



40 



Shigellosis 
Giardiasis 
Tuberculosis 



3 

1 

Active 

1 Primary Inactive 



The testing of persons exposed to tuberculosis and 
those persons whose employment require certification of 
freedom from that disease is another responsibility of the 
Town Nurse. One-hundred ninety mantoux tests were 
given to town residents for pre-employment and town 
firms in compliance with the Massachusetts Department 
of Public Health regulations. Home visits and telephone 
calls are made to families of active and some inactive 
tuberculosis cases on a periodic basis to insure understan- 
ding of the illness and that adequate medical follow-up is 
achieved. Numerous medical files are kept and updated 
on residents who have a positive tuberculosis test and are 
receiving medication and being seen in follow-up at the 
Lowell Chest Clinic. 

Maternal/Child Health Services 

Telephone correspondence is made to families with 
premature infants. Home visits are made by the nurse 
when deemed necessary to assist the mother and alleviate 
apprehension over the care of a premature infant. Other 
home visits are made by physician referral. These follow- 
ups are not only made for health supervision . but for 
education and referrals when indicated. Four premature 
births were reported for 1983. 

Immunization Program 

The Board of Health and Council on Aging sponsored 
two flu clinics this year. The vaccine was offered to the 
elderly and chronically ill persons as recommended by the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health. One-hun- 
dred twenty persons were immunized with pneumonia 
vaccine and six-hundred seventy-five persons wen- mi 
munized with flu vaccine. Two-hundred doses were given 
to nursing homes and twenty doses to the school nurses. 
Several home visits were made to bedridden or house- 
bound residents to administer flu vaccine. 

Hypertension 

Screening clinics were held the first Thursday of every 
month for town employees and residents. A separate 
screening clinic was held several months for members of 
the Police Department at Police Headquarters. Several 
screening clinics were conducted at the Chelmsford Mall 
during the past year. Blood pressure screenings for 
residents will be held at the Board of Health office the 
first Thursday of each month from 9:00 to 12:00. 

Community Health 

Since good health maintenance is a concern of every- 
one's, the Public Health Nurse also acts as a resource per- 
son in making proper referrals and in implementing 
health screening programs that can be efficiently offered 
to residents. Diabetic screening programs will be im- 
plemented this winter and the town's first Health Fair will 
take place this spring. The Health Fair will bring to- 
gether numerous health exhibitors and offer free health 
screenings to promote and encourage health awareness 
and maintenance. 



CHELMSFORD HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority continues to be ac- 
tive in applying for additional rental assistance programs. 
During the past year the authority received ten additional 
Section 8 Existing units and five additional Chapter 707 
units. The award of these additional units brings our 
total of Section 8 units to fifty-eight and Chapter 707 to 
thirteen units. 

Our on-going improvement programs included such 
items as painting, new fencing, carpeting, and new kit- 
chen linoleum at our North Chelmsford Community 
Residence and painting the hallways at Chelmsford 
Arms. An energy audit for Chelmsford Arms was con- 
ducted last year. The housing authority received funds 
from the Executive Office of Communities and Develop- 
ment to implement several of the improvements sug- 
gested by the audit to make the development energy effi- 
cient. Such improvements were insulation of the hot 
water tanks and changing incandescent lighting to 
fluorescent lighting. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority has received, for 
the second year in a row, a commendable rating from the 
Executive Office of Communities and Development. 

Five of our programs are funded by the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts through the Executive Office of 
Communities and Development under Chapter 667; 
Chelmsford Arms, completed in 1974, fifty-six regular 
units and eight handicapped units; the Community 
Residence purchased in 1974, eight units; six con- 
dominiums in Pickwick Estates were purchased in 1981; 
McFarlin Manor completed in 1981, forty-three regular 
units, three handicapped units, one four-bedroom con- 
gregate unit which serves the "frail elderly". Under 
Chapter 707 our "scattered site" program which started 
in 1975. we have eight units under lease in the private 
market and five new units coming under lease. Our most 
recent financial statement lists assets at $3,866,761.33, 
liabilities at $3,866,761.33 for all developments. 

Our programs now provide a total of one hundred and 
ninety-two units of low-income housing: Forty-six family; 
twenty-one handicapped; one hundred and twenty-five 
elderly. We submitted an application for 28 more Section 
8 units and are waiting for word of that application from 
HUD. The past year EOCD did not receive any addi- 
tional funding for public housing, however, the 
Chelmsford Housing Authority does keep updating the 
application information so we may submit our applica- 
tion as quickly as possible once notification is received. 

All developments of the Authority are formally in- 
spected every six months by staff and once a year by 
members of the Authority. This year the members in- 
spected the Community Residence in September, Pick- 
wick Estates in November, McFarlin Manor in October, 
and Chelmsford Arms in May. The inspections noted that 
only minor repairs were needed. 



41 



Because of the expanded responsibility of the Chelms- 
ford Housing Authority office staff, the housing authority 
negotiated with a local bank to provide data processing 
services. Members of the staff include Helen Cantara, 
Senior Clerk; John Lovett, Maintenance Mechanic; 
Richard O'Neil, Maintenance Laborer and Lisa 
Shanahan, Executive Director. 

Regular meetings are held at McFarlin Manor, 10 
Wilson Street at 7:30 p.m. on the first Tuesday of each 
month. The Annual Meeting is the first Tuesday in May. 
All meetings are open to the public. 

We would like to thank the residents of Chelmsford 
and the Town Officials for their continued support and 
cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ruth K. Delaney, Chairman 

Robert L. Hughes, Vice Chairman 

William P. Keohane, Treasurer 

Claude A. Harvey, Assistant Treasurer 

Pamela Turnbull, Member 

PARK COMMISSION 

We feel that we have had another good year. Our 
maintenance program progressed pretty well on schedule 
with the seeding of several areas. Our flower planting 
program is much smaller but we hope for better times 
ahead. We are able to maintain our Memorial Day plant- 
ings as well as some others during the summer season. 

We had the flag pole on the North Common painted as 
well as the one in Central Square opposite the Town Hall. 

The department has continued with their limited 
maintenance of the recreational areas. 

We look forward to another enjoyable year, helping to 
make our town a pleasant place for us to call our home. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert W. Wetmore, Chairman 

Eileen M. Duffy 

Arthur L. Bennett 

Donald P. Gray, Superintendent 



PLANNING BOARD 



1983 
Henrick R. Johnson, Jr., Chairman 
Thomas E. Firth, Jr., Vice Chairman 
Ann H. McCarthy, Clerk 
Eugene E. Gilet 
Charles A. Parlee 
Rosalind M. Boyle 
John F. McCarthy 
Recording Clerk, Kris Gleason 
Planning Board Engineer, John A. Visniewski 

The Chelmsford Planning Board began 1983 with Mrs. 
Carolyn Fenn as Chairperson. Mrs. Fenn chose not to run 
for re-election in April. Mr. John F. McCarthy was 
elected to the Board at the Annual Town Election. The 
Board re-organized and appointed Mr. Henrick R. 
Johnson, Jr. as Chairman, Thomas E. Firth, Jr., as Vice 
Chairman, and Ann H. McCarthy as Clerk and Eugene 
E. Gilet as representative to the Northern Middlesex Area 
Commission. Mrs. Jacqueline Sheehy resigned in October 
and Kris Gleason was appointed as Recording Clerk. 

After conducting public hearings, the Planning Board 
approved five two-lot subdivisions this year at various 
locations in Town under the Subdivision Control Law, 
waiving road construction on all these subdivisions. The 
Board also granted final approval on the forty lot subdivi- 
sion off Garrison Road and an eight lot subdivision off 
Acton Road. Under Subdivision Control Not Required, 
forty new lots were approved by the Planning Board. 

A great deal of the Board's time this year was devoted 
to reviewing site plans for new buildings and additions to 
existing buildings, subject to review and approval by the 
Planning Board. Twelve site plans were approved. Ten of 
these were for industrial development in the following 
locations: off Industrial Avenue and Delmore Drive, 
Billerica Road, School Street, Riverneck Road, Elizabeth 
Drive, Patricia Drive, and Mill Road. Two major multi- 
family condominium complexes were approved off 
Wellman Avenue and off Littleton Road. 

After lengthy discussions with concerned residents 
about the increase in industrial development on Mill 
Road and the Billerica Road areas, the Planning Board 
requested a traffic analysis of the Northern Middlesesx 
Area Commission. The final draft of Phase I of that 
review is under advisement by the Planning Board for im- 
plementation in 1984. 

Two amendments to the zoning by-laws were adopted 
at the Annual Town Meeting. The first was on the pro- 
posed zoning amendment to Section 1424 to allow a $200 
Site Plan Review fee. The second was an amendment that 
would allow day care homes in the Mobile Home Park. 

1983 has been a productive and industrious year for the 
Planning Board requiring increased hours for both Plan- 
ning Board Members and staff. The Planning Board 
analyzes each situation on a case by case basis. The pro- 
jections for 1984 indicate that with the current growth in 



42 



industrial and commercial development, the Board will 
be spending more and more of its time studying and 
analyzing the impact of this growth in Chelmsford. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 
Chairman 



CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Adams Library, Boston Road. Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Branch Library 
Newfield Street, North Chelsmford 

Library Trustees 

Brenda McDermott, Chairperson 
Jim Cooper, Vice-chairperson 
Elizabeth McCarthy, Treasurer 
Janet Hendl, Secretary 
Howard K. Moore 
Roger P. Welch 

The computer project consumed a great deal of time 
for both staff and volunteers, who alone contributed 
nearly 1200 hours, inputting the CPL book collection in- 
to the data-base. Staff and volunteers have proven their 
dedication and perseverance by inputting a total of 
60,000 books, 3,500 patrons, 8,000 paperbacks. 3,000 
records and cassettes and nearly 1.000 magazines. All in 
dications point to an on-line date of March 19. 1984 as 
scheduled. 



In conclusion, I want to stress my appreciation for the 
continued commitment on the part of trustees, staff. 
Friends, volunteers and community members to main- 
taining the strength and viability of the Chelmsford 
Public Library. 



STATISTICAL REPORT 

Monies deposited with the Town Treasurer 
Circulation 229,729 

New Cards issued 1,377 

Employees (full time) 10 

Employees (part time) 21 

Department Heads: 

Goldie Creamer (MacKay Branch Fine Arts) 

Bea Beaubien (Children's House) 

Nell Haederle (Reference) 

Nancy Jo Brown (Technical Services) 

Linda Robinson (Circulation) 



S20.789 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Ann E. Gallmeyer 
Director 



The staff was reorganized to achieve clearer lines of 
communication, and, as a result, the assistant director's 
position was eliminated, and a Community Services 
Specialist. Judy Buswick. was hired on a part-time basis. 
Other staff changes included the resignation of Joan 
Allard. Reference Department Head, and the hiring of 
Nell Haederle to replace her. As a result of the 
reorganization and particularly the creation of the Com 
munity Services Specialist position, the library has ex 
perienced an increase in programming for the public, in 
eluding film series, book discussion groups, and musica 
performances funded by an Arts Lottery grant. In addi 
tion, the Community Services Specialist acts as volunteer 
coordinator and the number of volunteers has increased 
at all library agencies. 

A book selection policy was adopted by the Trustees 
and in the plans for 1984 is a staff policy manual. The 
Friends of the Library contributed a great deal of time 
and energy to the two fund-raisers: the Spring Fair and 
the Annual Book Sale, both of which were successful 
financially. 

Plans for the future include automating the business 
and administrative functions of the library with the ac- 
quisition of a microcomputer. The library is also seeking 
grant funds to support children's activities during the 
summer of '84 as well as continuing to support the music 
programs which will begin in the fall of '84. 



43 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 



Judith A. Olsson 



PRECINCT 


REGISTERED 




VOTERS 


1 


1,550 


2 


1,068 


3 


1,910 


4 


640 


5 


2,005 


6 


1,452 


7 


1,074 


8 


1,198 


9 


1,071 


10 


1,884 


11 


1,101 


12 


1,617 


TOTALS 


16,570 



Richard F. Bum, Jr., Chairman 

Mary E. St.Hilaire, Ex officio 

Voting strength as of December 31, 1983 



ENROLLED VOTERS 
DEMOCRATIC RE 



500 
429 
612 
325 
681 
554 
409 
387 
403 
660 
427 
575 

5,962 



Janet F. Bonica 



BLICAN 


UNENROLLED 




VOTERS 


320 


730 


164 


475 


233 


1,065 


70 


245 


332 


992 


238 


660 


155 


510 


232 


579 


130 


538 


285 


939 


183 


491 


220 


822 



2,563 



8,046 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




Samuel Poulten, Chairman 
Nicholas G. Gavriel, Vice-Chairman 
Carol C. Cleven, Secretary 

Eric King, Student Member 
Kelly Howland, Student Member 



Carl A. Olsson 
James Brough 



44 



THE ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1983 



Years 


Student 


Teaching P 




Enrollment 


(Includi 
Special: 


1977-78 


8,936 


550 


1978-79 


8,390 


539 


1979-80 


7,940 


526 


1980-81 


7,477 


513 


1981-82 


6,980 


390 


1982-83 


6,512 


371 


1983-84 


6,103 


371 


Projected 1984-85 


5,699 


356 



COMPARATIVE DATA 

ms Administrative 

(Bldg. & Central) 
Office) 



41 

41 
39 
39 
31 
30 
29 
28 



Other 1 


Budget 2 


Personnel 




257 


13,024,958 


232 


13,270,419 


234 


14,435,848 


222 


15,496,000 


212 


14,543,772 


207 


15,050,709 


207 


15,798.307 


206 


16,716.207 



The calendar year 1983 included the end of the 
1982-83 school year, events occurring during the summer 
period, and the beginning of a new 1983-84 school year. 
These overlaps of time have special significance because 
they call attention to the fact that education does not 
stop. ..nor does it simply start. ..it continues. The very 
process of education emphasizes the veneration that it 
deserves. In the past... in the present... and for the future, 
education represents the best hope of mankind. 

The 1982-83 school year was challenging and produc- 
tive for the Chelmsford Public Schools. The ac- 
complishments were diverse, some large, some small, and 
some just beginning steps on large projects. But all were 
exciting and attest to the vitality of the school system. 
Declining enrollment, staffing, evaluation, curriculum, 
collective bargaining and a myriad of national reports 
and recommendations dealing with the condition of 
education in the United States were all part of the 
challenge which the School Department tackled with 
vigor and purpose. 

The ongoing accumulation of knowledge and the 
changing nature of scholarly interpretation were 
recognized by a dynamic Chelmsford staff which par- 
ticipated in curriculum review and development, and 
which also continued its own study in college or in 
specially designed in-service courses and workshops. 

The tests of a school system are how well the students 
learn, and whether the parents and the community are 
happy with their schools. Based on test data; on local, 
state and national competitions: and on formal and in- 
formal surveys, the Chelmsford School System has been 
successful. However, neither the schools nor the com- 
munity should be satisfied with past performance. Both 
must work for better communications, better under- 
standing, and even higher levels of expectation. It is im- 
portant that citizens participate actively in school issues 
and express their concerns to the School Committee in 
order to ensure that the best decisions possible are made 
for the education of the young people of Chelmsford. The 
school system welcomes suggestions from any and all in- 
dividuals. 



The budget format analyzes the proposed school 
budget in three different ways: 

1 . Line items (salaries, texts, supplies, utilities, trans- 
portation, etc.) 

2. Program areas (English, Math, Reading, Science, 
Special Ed., etc.) 

3. Cost centers (Byam, Harrington, Parker, South 
Row. Westlands, Junior High School, and High 
School) 

The format is part of a continuing process by which 
Chelmsford school programs are developed, im- 
plemented, funded and evaluated. This budget format 
serves to focus the committee's attention on both effective 
and weak programs, enabling the committee to monitor 
spending rates and levels of program achievement. By 
studying implementation of the budget throughout the 
year, the committee is able to ascertain the programs that 
need greater or less financial support and to identify the 
factors that guide the budget. 

The School Committee believes that the budget con- 
tained in this Annual Town Report lives up to the town's 
educational expectations. The budget process, over the 
last several years, has produced a tighter, more efficiently 
managed budget. The committee feels that the overall 
condition of the school system remains strong. Where an 
orderly contraction of the system appears advisable, the 
Committee will consider its implementation. 

The Chelmsford Public Schools have been responsive 
to the needs of students while being sensitive to communi- 
ty needs and problems. Demands upon the staff increase 
progressively. It is axiomatic that planning teaching 
strategies and supplying materials to encourage students 
to progress according to their needs is no easy task. Plan- 
ning for and teaching individual students require effort 
and learning extending far beyond the limits of the nor- 
mal school day. But the primary function of a school is 
not to teach, but to instill the desire to learn. 

The following reports written by school personnel will 
provide you with a sampling of the accomplishments of 
our young people as well as a better understanding of the 



45 



learning environment and the practical experiences pre- 
sent in our schools today. 

FROM THE PRINCIPAL 
OF CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

In the fall of 1982, a thirteen member committee spent 
three days at Chelmsford High School evaluating pro- 
grams and staff and submitted its final report in March, 
1983. The report includes numerous commendations as 
well as recommendations to improve what the committee 
rated an excellent high school. It seems Fitting to quote 
some of the comments and observations of the visiting 
committee, in order to highlight its impression of 
Chelmsford High School. 

"It was made abundantly clear to the visiting com- 
mittee that Chelmsford High School is a valued 
resource in the community." 

"The statement of philosophy and objectives is put 
forth clearly. It is an ambitious one, reflecting the 
commitments to a total education for the students." 

"An extensive and comprehensive student services 
program is provided..." 

"The teaching staff is perceived to be a highly 
qualified and dedicated one, sufficient in numbers 
to attain the objectives of the school. The staff 
maintains a sympathetic understanding of student 
needs, demonstrates a high degree of profes- 
sionalism overall." 

"The visiting committee garnered the view that the 
administration of Chelmsford High School clearly 
focus upon the student and services therefor." 

"The committee was impressed with the school 
facility." 

"We sensed a positive atmosphere in the school. 
The students are of the opinion that staff members 
and administrators are approachable and concern- 
ed." 

Many of the educational achievements of previous 
years were matched or surpassed in 1983. The Math 
Team was first in the Merrimack Valley and rose to the 
number one spot in New England. Ninety-three new 
members were inducted in the National Honor Society. 
The Class of 1983 was comprised of 630 graduates. This 
class had the lowest percentage of students who did not 
meet graduation requirements. In addition to the many 
awards and scholarships conferred by various colleges 
and universities, members of the Class of 1983 received 
$34,000 in scholarships awarded at graduation. 

Nineteen hundred eighty-three was a highly successful 
years for Chelmsford High School in its cultural pursuits. 
Several students in the band, chorus, and orchestra 
qualified in allstate competition. The jazz and concert 
bands were invited to play at the finish line in the Boston- 
to-Providence run sponsored by Channel 5, Sheraton 
Boston, and the Boston Herald. The music department 
was most successful in its production of Showboat. In 
February, the Drama Club became semi-finalists in the 



State Drama Festival. In November, the club continued 
its string of acclaimed productions with the The Murder 
Room. 

Another source of pride for Chelmsford High School 
was the Columbia University Scholastic Press Association 
award for the second successive year of a first place cer- 
tificate to the school newsmagazine, The Voice. Art 
students were awarded a record number of Gold Keys in 
the Boston Globe Art Contest. Finally, the Chelmsford 
High School Faculty Association's production of Dirty 
Tricks in High Places raised a substantial amount for 
the Town of Chelmsford Scholarship Fund. 

An atmosphere of internationalism continued to 
permeate Chelmsford High School. Again this year 
students from abroad attended our school, and five 
Chelmsford students spent their summers in Chile, 
Kenya, Brazil, Japan, and Panama. Two students took 
part in a year-long program in Japan and Greece. 
American Field Service students from Portugal, 
Greenland, and France, and American International 
Field Service students from Japan and Spain, were hosted 
by Chelmsford families. Exchange programs between 
France, Venezuela, and Chelmsford High School con- 
tinued working toward greater world understanding for 
all students involved. 

Athletic teams earned acclaim in sports, winning con- 
ference championships in girls basketball, boys swimm- 
ing, boys cross-country, volleyball, girls tennis, boys ten- 
nis, and softball. In addition to being conference cham- 
pions, the boys cross-country team captured the Division 
I Conference Massachusetts championship. The highlight 
of the sports season was the award by the Boston Globe of 
the Dalton Trophy to Chelmsford High School in Division 
I competition, in recognition of accomplishments in the 
total athletic program. 

Students continued their commitment to service and 
community endeavors. Over 200 pints of blood were 
again donated to the Red Cross. Once again, students 
took part in the physical therapy program at the YMCA. 
Key Club members again hosted the Special Ed Prom. 

The Parents Advisory Council again hosted the Prom 
Breakfast, which attracted twice as many students as in 
the previous year. The PAC continues to inform the com- 
munity of school happenings through publicity releases 
and newsletters. Staff Appreciation Day, when the entire 
High School staff is honored, was again greatly ap- 
preciated. 

The establishment of a new program at Chelmsford 
High School, Students Against Driving Drunk (SADD), is 
making an impact on the student body and the entire 
town. 

In May, the John T. Conrad Gymnasium and the 
Thomas L. Rivard Media Center were dedicated in 
ceremonies honoring two educational administrators who 
devoted many years of service to the school children of 
Chelmsford. 



46 



FROM THE PRINCIPAL 
OF SOUTH ROW SCHOOL 

The longer one serves as the principal of a school the 
more strongly reinforced the notion becomes that the 
single school is, indeed, a unique community organiza- 
tion. Students, parents, support personnel, teachers and 
administrator comprise a social system, a kind of 
microsociety, established to convey knowledge and 
develop skills and abilities needed by citizens living and 
functioning in a democracy. Naturally, this system of in- 
terrelationships functions best when all the interdepen- 
dent elements work together in an atmosphere that is 
characterized by cooperativeness and dedication, and 
where the welfare of each student is paramount. Our 
staff, students and parents have worked hard to make this 
a reality for South Row School. 

Our student body, perhaps because of its youthfulness 
and its eight-year age span, has as one would expect a 
divergent range of expectations, levels of aspiration and, 
of course, maturity. Yet our students have many common 
attributes. They are generally well-behaved, quite caring 
about each other, and have a willingness to work together 
and to assume responsibility. Increasingly, our students 
have shown greater concern about global humanity and 
their environment. 

South Row School parents continue to give excellent 
support to their school in a variety of ways. Many parents 
freely donate time to work as library volunteers, 
kindergarten helpers, room mothers, and chaperones on 
educational field trips. The school's P.T.O. members 
work extremely hard to promote special programs, ac- 
tivities, and educational field trips. The officers and ex- 
ecutive board members of the P.T.O. give a great deal of 
time and energy to support the school not only by raising 
funds and working on activities but by serving as a soun- 
ding board to the principal and staff and by giving advice 
and counsel. On an individual basis, parents are in part- 
nership with the school's staff, working together to pro- 
vide their children with successful education. 

The school's staff continually strives to perform its 
myriad tasks effectively. The staff recognizes each in- 
dividual's worth and knows that a feeling of success is 
essential for growth. The staff believes that all students 
are capable of learning and expects them to learn. The 
instructional program reflects this belief. 

The microsociety of the school in many ways reflects 
the strengths and weaknesses of the larger society of 
which it is part. As the larger society continues to seek 
solutions to its problems, this school community also re- 
mains committed in its efforts to improve its effectiveness. 

FROM CURRICULUM SPECIALIST 
FOR ART AND MUSIC EDUCATION 

The Art Department serves all the schools, and at every 
grade level its concerns are for the growth and develop- 
ment of the child. The curriculum is used as a guide to 
ensure that the basic objectives are applied equally in 
every classroom. 



The emphasis at the primary level is to guide children 
in visual, manipulative and coordinative skills. These 
skills are often integrated with other areas of the cur- 
riculum. 

The upper elementary grades continue the conceptual 
approach, with more concentration on specific goals such 
as color, perspective, and basic design. 

At Junior High school level, we offer a broad range of 
experiences to the students to make them more aware of 
themselves, their ideas, their talents, and their world. 

At the High School, we have a consolidated program 
which gives every student in the first two years a 
knowledge of the ways of developing and expressing an 
idea in a variety of forms... in clay, weaving, painting, 
sculpture or graphics. The third and fourth years of the 
program are spent in developing special skills and needs 
for each student on an individual basis. Many of them 
will go on to art schools and colleges, and much of their 
work is directed towards building up a presentational 
portfolio. 

The Music Department strives to help students discover 
and develop their musical talents for better understan- 
ding and enjoyment of all kinds of music. 

Each elementary school has a music specialist who is 
responsible for all music education in the building, with 
the exception of instruction on band and orchestral in- 
struments. Each school has weekly lessons in music along 
with a performing choral group. All schools have song 
flute ensembles and 'or recorder consorts. Some schools 
have guitar clubs or Orff bands. 

Our curriculum guide is based on the conceptual ap- 
proach. We have a spiral curriculum that begins in 
Kindergarten and continues through junior high school. 

General music instruction in the Junior High School is 
given to all seventh and eighth graders. General music in 
seventh and eighth is basically designed for non- 
performing students; for many, it is their last formal con- 
tact with school music. Choral groups are maintained for 
all junior high students who wish to join them. 

The High School offers courses for both performing 
and nonperforming students. A staff of three instructors 
offers courses in music, theory, guitar classes, small and 
large vocal and instrumental ensembles, and instrumen- 
tal instruction; practice rooms are available for in- 
dividual study. 

Instrumental music in our schools provides an ex- 
perience not found in other areas within the Music 
Department. Instruction in playing orchestral string in- 
struments is offered starting in grade 3, and in all band 
and orchestral instruments from grades 4 through 12. 
Every student has an opportunity to participate in small - 
group and ensemble instruction during school hours or 
after school as part of the extra-curriculum program. 



47 



Instrumental and choral ensembles play in school and 
community concerts and programs throughout the school 
year. Junior high and high school students perform in 
district and state festivals and competitions. 

The Chelmsford Friends of Music, continuing to sup- 
port the music programs in all schools, have contributed 
a great deal of support to scholarships and to the private 
lesson program. 

FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Student enrollment in the Business Education Depart- 
ment remains consistent with enrollment figures in 
1982-83. 

Curriculum changes introduced include: 

1 . The updating of the curriculum materials in the 
Computer Data Entry course. This course now in- 
cludes training on SuperCalc, the electronic 
spreadsheet, which is used to solve a variety of 
math and business-related problems and WORD- 
STAR, a word processing software program. By 
using these programs, students are able to create, 
compose, edit, and record research in business 
and other relevant personal-use data on the Z-89 
microcomputers. 

2. Development of curriculum materials for instruc- 
tion on the Apple He microcomputers in the ad- 
vanced accounting classes. 

3. Programming in BASIC on the Apple He 
microcomputers, which arrived in November, 
1983. 

4. A full year of Typing I now replaces semester 
courses in Typing. 

5. Microcomputer applications on the Apple He are 
part of the curriculum in the Office Simulation 
course and in Fashion Retailing. Toward the end 
of the school year, students in the Introduction to 
Business and Recordkeeping courses will complete 
a unit assignment on the terminals. 

6. Materials for the preparation of the Distributive 
Education Clubs of America competitions are now 
a part of the Fashion Retailing curriculum. 
Students in this course will be competing on the 
district, state, and national levels for the first time 
this year. 

Such constant revision and evaluation of courses by 
staff members ensures the vitality of the Business Educa- 
tion curriculum. 

The equipment inventory in the department continues 
to increase as a result of Federal Grant project writing. In 
July, 1983, eight Apple He microcomputers and three 
Epson dot matrix printers were granted to the Business 
Education Department. The Business Education Depart- 
ment equipment purchased with federal grant money 
now includes: 9 Apple He microcomputers, 4 Apple He 
microcomputers, 8 Epson dot matrix printers, 2 Silver 



Reed electronic typewriters, 4 Shart electronic desktop 
calculators, 11 Adler self- correcting typewriters, 1 IBM 
Memory typewriter, 17 Zenith 89 microcomputers, 2 
NEC Spinwriters, and 2 Olivetti word processors. 

A five-year plan for the purchase and updating of of- 
fice equipment and computer terminals is in its 
preliminary stage. Input will be gathered from local 
businesses and state agencies. 

Enrollments in Accounting I, Accounting I A, and 
Basic Programming are high and a good indication of the 
need for these courses. It is hoped that in the upcoming 
school years, more students will select Computer Data 
Entry, soon to be called "Electronic Information Process- 
ing". This is a one-semester course that provides students 
with an opportunity to learn the operation of a 
microcomputer for the purpose of recording and process- 
ing data, a skill applicable to a wide range of careers. 
Enrollment figures in Stenography are low. Due to time 
restrictions, many Business Education students are selec- 
ting a computer course over Stenography. The two skills 
complement each other, each with different purposes, in 
carrying out an office's activities; they should be regarded 
as "partners in productivity". Gregg shorthand is still in 
demand in the modern business office. 

The Business Education Occupational Skill Center, 
funded through federal monies, is in its second produc- 
tive year. A full-time teacher and teacher aide work in 
consultation with Guidance personnel anH the Business 
Education staff in planning, implementing, and 
evaluating goals and objectives for each business student 
enrolled in this center. 

The Distributive Education program at Chelmsford 
High provides students with group instruction in general 
marketing techniques, merchandising, and manage- 
ment. The experience gained in class, in working in the 
school store, on field trips, by listening to guest speakers, 
and being involved in school and community projects, 
provides students with knowledge and employment skills. 
The Cooperative Work Experience Program is available 
to students enrolled in the second year of the Distributive 
Education Program. The students in this program are 
which holds district, state, and national competitions for 
its members every year. For the past three years, 
Chelmsford High students have walked away with honors 
at both the district and state competitions. Last spring, 
two of our graduates went on to compete in the national 
competition. 

Support staff of the Business Education program in- 
cludes two job counselors who are housed in the Career 
Education Center and work closely with all Guidance per- 
sonnel and Business Education staff members in counsel- 
ing students in career decision-making, providing job 
placement services, and comprehensive occupational in- 
terest testing. The counselors help students in making a 
smooth transition from the school environment to full- 
time employment. The counselors hosted a breakfast in 
December for local business/executives as a step towards 
bridging the gap between education and industry. The 
formation of a Business Advisory Counsil, a job- 



48 



shadowing program, and an internship program are pro- 
jects under development as a result of this breakfast 
meeting. A Job Fair and a Fashion Show, given by the 
students in the Fashion Retailing course, will involve local 
businesses in providing students with practical ex- 
perience. 

The Business Education staff wants the citizens of 
Chelmsford to make use of the department's facilities, 
technology, and equipment in preparing for the world of 
tomorrow. Several adults are enrolled in both the day and 
evening programs. Community education is a beginning, 
and we look forward to seeing its future expansion. 

FROM THE DIRECTOR OF CHAPTER I 

Title I of the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Act 
(ESEA) was passed by the United States Congress to help 
local schools overcome educational deprivation. Under 
the law, the federal government appropriates money an- 
nually to school districts throughout the' nation. The 
funds received by each community are determined by the 
government. 

Project proposals are written by the director, BeverlyJ. 
Hedison, and sent to the State Department of Education 
to be initiated in each area as a compensatory educa- 
tional program. 

Chapter I has been part of the Chelmsford School 
System since 1975. The children arc instructed in reading 
and mathematics at the Parker School (grades 4-6) and 
the Westlands School (grades 1-6). Westlands' students 
have the opportunity to work with part of the computer 
program. The use of this added tool of learning has pro- 
ven to be very popular and has produced great results. 

A child's participation in this project docs not mean 
that a student is not capable, but only that he she is not. 
for one reason or another, working to his or her potential. 
Instruction in the past has proven beneficial in mathe- 
matics and reading, as well as in improving the child's 
self-image. With the combined efforts of the teaching 
staff, administration and interested parents, we are pre- 
paring the whole child for the future as well as the pre- 
sent. 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
COMMUNITY EDUCATION 

The Chelmsford School Committee appointed the first 
Director of Community Education on July 12, 1983. 

The first major task has been to restructure our adult 
education program. Brochures offering over forty courses 
were mailed last fall to very home in Chelmsford, and the 
winter course listings contained over eighty morning, 
afternoon and evening courses. "Adult Education" has 
been replaced by Community Education, and students of 
junior high school age and older have been invited to at- 
tend. 



Northeastern University has also arrived at Chelmsford 
High School this year, with its fourteenth extension cam- 
pus open on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. 

In December, Community Education co-sponsored a 
business/education breakfast with Chelmsford High 
School. Over sixty representatives of companies in the 
area attended. As a result, a Business Advisory Council 
has been formed at the High School. 

Other major projects which are being explored are an 
extended day program for current elementary students, a 
pre-school program for three- and four-year olds, child 
care and summer camp. In combined efforts with the 
League of Women Voters, a questionnaire centered on 
these needs was sent to all residents in December, and 
programs may begin as early as next September. 

The Community Education Committee, consisting of 
volunteer residents, held its first meeting in November 
and has been meeting one evening a month to discuss 
programs and activities. Any interested community mem- 
ber is invited to attend by contacting Scott Johnson, 
Director of Community Education, at 256-4981. 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
COMMUNITY TELEVISION SERVICES 

Cable 43 began with the signing of an agreement bet- 
ween Lowell Cable and Chelmsford. The company 
agreed to provide two local access channels and $75,000 
of new color equipment with which to produce television 
programs. The School Department proposed that the 
equipment be based in the High School television studio 
and agreed to hire a full-time director to oversee the pro- 
duction of television programs and provide funds for 
maintenance and expansion. 

On December 22, 1982, Cable 43 began telecasting 
community messages twenty-four hours per day. On 
March 27, 1983. the first programs were telecast. Regu- 
larly scheduled programs include Crafting, Young at 
Heart, The Lion's Tale, Story Time, Trivia Time, Fun 
and Fitness Time, Energize thru Exercise, Easy Does It-. 
School Committee and Selectmen's meetings. In addi- 
tion, many special events have been telecast, such as 
Town Meetings, the League of Women Voters' Can- 
didates' Night. CHS Graduation, Elks Current Events 
News Quiz, concerts and lectures. Currently, Cable 43 
telecasts an average of 18 and % hours of programs each 
week. 

Chelmsford High students may opt to take a course titl- 
ed "Introduction to TV Production." Following the suc- 
cessful completion of this course, students may enroll in a 
service study program as a TV production assistant. 
These students produce The Lion's Tale and constitute 
the crews for other programs. Chelmsford teachers have 
also participated in several workshops in which they 
receive hands-on training in the use of television equip- 
ment. Over thirty adult volunteers have helped with 
Cable 43 programs or have produced their own. 



49 



In the future, Cable 43 hopes to expand its programm- 
ing to include more sports events and other programs of 
community interest. Cable 43 is also looking for ways to 
privately fund its operations. 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
DATA PROCESSING 

Since the installation of our own "in-house" Digital 
11/44 minicomputer, many administrative tasks have 
been computerized. This automation of business applica- 
tions, started in October of 1981, continues even now 
since the computer is a cost-effective time and work saver. 
The objectives of this computerization effort are to 
reduce paperwork; provide faster and more accurate 
retrieval of student and school information; share and 
create school information that is useful and transferable 
among the various types of computer hardware and ap- 
plications; provide teachers and administrative staff with 
computer management systems to keep better track of 
student records, performance and needs. These goals 
have been achieved with the implementation and refine- 
ment of computer business systems in student record 
keeping, school accounting, personnel, facilities inven- 
tory, transportation, forecasting, and special-needs 
tracking. 

With the installation of administrative microcom- 
puters in September, 1983, the staff at every school enjoys 
the benefits of word processing, electronic spreadsheet 
capability, a data-base system capability, and computer 
literacy training. 

In-house workshops have been conducted for the 
school and town staff word processing, microcomputer 
operations, and supercalc (electronic spreadsheet). 
Future workshops will expound on various relevant 
microcomputer topics. 

The administrative microcomputers enable every 
school to tailor a specific application to its particular 
needs. Furthermore, student data can now be transferred 
to the next school or grade without additional keying in 
of information. These microcomputers can also transfer 
data to the system's minicomputer for analysis of data or 
updating of information. With this capability, the 
schools now have computer business systems dealing with 
purchase orders; teacher attendance and schedules; 
library overdue lists; inventory systems; student health 
immunization records; conference and field trip records; 
budget preparation; and full word processing capabili- 
ties. 

The School Department and the Board of Registrars/ 
Town Clerk's Office have implemented a voter registra- 
tion and town census data base. This year will see the se- 
cond run of the town census on the school computer. The 
Town Clerk's Office provides all the labor to update and 
maintain the system, while the School Department pro- 
vides the computer resources and technical expertise to 
store and print all pertinent data. This alliance of school 
and municipal resources has resulted in faster reporting 



and information retrieval at lower cost. 

The Police Department and the School Department 
have embarked on an effort to computerize parking 
tickets for the town. The Police Department has purchas- 
ed a microcomputer for this task, and the project is in its 
final stages of development. The Police Department also 
utilizes its microcomputer for internal record keeping, 
ensuring the privacy of its own data. 

The High School and Junior High School have col- 
laborated on an automatic telephone (robot) calling 
system to notify parents of a student's absence, a project 
which is presently being evaluated for prospective pur- 
chase. The Chelmsford School Department was the first 
school system on the east coast to implement "robot call- 
ing." By helping to increase student attendance, the 
School Department receives a larger dollar reimburse- 
ment from the federal government. 

Future projects will be geared to developing a plotting 
and graphing capability for business applications; refin- 
ing the capability to interface the microcomputers with 
the main computer; devising a telephone cost analysis 
system; studying the use of cable television for computer 
data communications; and supporting the existing 
business applications in the town and the schools. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

Encouraged by the many recent reports which em- 
phasize the importance of foreign language study, the ad- 
ministration and the foreign language staff spent much 
time in studying ways to enhance its program. Staff com- 
mittees worked on new language offerings and foreign 
language as a graduation requirement. Guidance also 
helped in surveying what colleges in the area were doing 
in language offerings and requirements at the post- 
secondary level. Based on their work, the staff made 
several recommendations to the administration, some of 
which will be implemented in the 1984-85 school year. A 
pilot course in Russian will be offered next year at the 
High School, where German will also be retained as part 
of the program. Ways of increasing language courses at 
the Junior High were also explored. 

In 1982-83, approximately 38% of junior high and 
63% of high school students enrolled in language classes. 
Spanish, French and Latin continue to have strong ap- 
peal, but we look forward to expanding our offerings. At 
present, students at almost any academic level can be ac- 
commodated in our programs; and although we are en- 
couraged by renewed interest in and emphasis on foreign 
language, we are anxious to maintain and expand the 
programs in light of budget constraints and the imminent 
decline in enrollment at the secondary level. 

The exchange programs to Venezuela and France con- 
tinue to be important. The exchange with France has 
become so popular that, for the second successive year, 
two groups of C.H.S. students went to France in the spr- 



50 



ing. Recent economic problems in Venezuela have severe- 
ly limited that country's participation; however, C.H.S. 
was one of the few U.S. schools to continue in the ex- 
change, in this case with a new "link" school in Bar- 
quisimeto. Preparation courses for taking part in both ex- 
changes are now part of the foreign language curriculum. 
Selected students are required to enroll in the ap- 
propriate course, for which they receive five graduation 
credits. 



FROM THE RESOURCE INSTRUCTOR 
FOR GIFTED AND TALENTED 

The Enrichment Program of Chelmsford (EPOCH) is 
now in the second year. It is designed to enhance the lear- 
ning experience supplied in the classroom. 

The program is based on the Enrichment TRIAD 
Revolving Door Identification Model which identifies 
three types of learning experience. Type I focuses on 
general exploration using speakers, slides, films, etc. 
Type II involves group training in such subjects as 
creative thinking, creative problem-solving, research and 
time management. Type III links Type I and Type II into 
product-oriented follow-ups. Each student is expected to 
do a Type III research project, which is an in-depth in- 
vestigation into a topic of his or her interest. 

The program has been extended to the Junior High 
School this year. It is voluntary, and the students meet 
after school in small groups with the instructor. 

Other after-school programs have been planned for 
elementary students through the Community Education 
Director. A variety of topics are offered and presented at 
the elementary schools throughout the town. 

A series of teacher workshops will be offered again this 
year, funded through the Commonwealih-In-Srmcc In 
stitute as was done last year. A growing number of 
teachers arc expressing interest in participating. 

An evaluation of EPOCH was completed in August by 
private consultants with a questionnaire circulated to 
students and parents, teachers and principals. Positive 
results were forthcoming from all groups. Most of the 
specific recommendations that were made have already 
been implemented. 



51 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF GUIDANCE 

Following are pertinent facts and figures for the Class 
of 1983. Also included is a page combining Chelmsford 
High School and Nashoba Tech statistics for an overview 
of Chelmsford public school graduates: 



Number of graduates 
Four-year colleges 
Two-year colleges 
Other Post-Secondary 
Total Post-Secondary 
Employment 
Undecided 
Military 
Marriage 

Highlights: 



Seventy-eight percent of the graduates will continue 
their education. After two years of increase from (71% in 
1980, to 76% in 1981, to 79% in 1982) there is an ap- 
parent leveling off this year at 78%. 

Sixty-two percent of the total will attend four-year 
schools, the same percentage as in 1982. 

Thirty percent will attend four-year Massachusetts 
state colleges/universities. This is a four percent drop. 

One-hundred percent of the top 20% of graduate 
students (124) will enter college in September. It was 
98% last year. 

Business Management continues to be an important 
career direction, but Math and Science related careers 
far outdistance all others. 



979 




1980 




1981 




1982 




1983 




611 




630 




647 




611 




620 




351 


57.5% 


366 


58.1% 


391 


60.4% 


379 


62% 


384 


62% 


69 


11.3% 


55 


8.7% 


83 


12.8% 


89 


14.6% 


77 


12.4% 


32 


5.2% 


24 


3.8% 


16 


2.5% 


17 


2.8% 


20 


3.2% 


452 


74% 


445 


70.6% 


490 


75.7% 


485 


79.4% 


481 


77.6% 


139 


22.7% 


142 


22.5% 


146 


22.6% 


102 


16.7% 


105 


16.9% 


3 


.4% 


25 


3.9% 


9 


1.4% 


10 


1.6% 


23 


3.7% 


16 


2.6% 


13 


2.1% 


2 


.3% 


12 


2% 


9 


1.45% 


1 




5 


.07% 






2 


• 3% 







Fifteen students failed to graduate for academic 
reasons, one- half the total of the previous year. 

1,874 transcripts were processed for the Class of 1983, 
686 for past graduates. 



Here is a summary of career choices: 



307 



143 



58 
26 

13 

9 

13 

51 

620 



The professional field: medicine, law, 

teaching, engineering, etc. 

Managers, proprietors and officials: 

(manage a business, own your own 

business, etc.) 

Clerical, secretarial, office work 

Skilled worker-craftsman (a foreman with 

a trade) 

Semi-skilled worker (truck driver, factory 

worker) 

Unskilled worker (construction) 

Other not listed 

Undecided 

Total 



Sixty-one candidates took 95 advanced/placement ex- 
ams with 78 of that total in the college credit cate- 
gory—an 82% success rate. 

Seven of the top 62 will attend the University of 
Lowell; six the University of Vermont; four Rensselaer 
Polytech. 



52 



ADDENDUM TO INCLUDE ALL 

CHELMSFORD PUBLIC SECONDARY 

STUDENTS, CHELMSFORD HIGH 

& NASHOBA TECH 





Total Post- 


Total 


(employment, 




Secondarv 


Others 


military, etc.) 


Chelmsford High seniors 


481 


139 


620 


Nashoba Tech (Chelmsford Srs.) 


9 


44 


53 




490 


18S 


673 


PERCENTAGES 








Chelmsford High seniors 


77.6 


22.4 




Nashoba Tech (Chelmsford Srs.) 


16.9 


83.1 





COMBINED 72.8% 



TOP SIXTY-TWO STUDENTS— CLASS OF 1983 
(Top 10%) 



1. 


M.I.T. 


Chemical Engineering 


2. 


Tufts 


Biochemistry 


3. 


Washington University 


Prc-Med 


4. 


Brown 


Engineering 


5. 


Cornell 


Engineering 


6. 


Brandeis 


Chemivirs 


7. 


Colgate 


Undecided 


8. 


Rensselaer Polytech 


Electrical Engineering 


9. 


Univ. of California/Berkeley 


Business Management 


10. 


Worcester Polytech 


Chemical Engineering 


11. 


Rensselaer Polvtcch 


Engineering 


12. 


Univ. of Massachusetts 


Math 


13. 


Clark 


P^chology 


14. 


Ohio State 


Electrical Engineering 


15. 


A.F.S. 




16. 


Northeastern 


Computer Science 


17. 


Rice Universitv 


Geology 


18. 


Univ. of Vermont 


Biology 


19. 


Colgate 


Sociology 


20. 


Case Western Reserve 


Engineering 


21. 


Cxirncll 


Pwt hnlogs 


22. 


Bowdoin 


French 


23. 


Boston University 


Biology 


24. 


Univer. of New Hampshire 


Science 


25. 


Williams 


Biologv or Maih 


26. 


Brand wii 


American Studies 


27. 


Syracuse 


Architrt iiirr 


28. 


Hoi J Cross, College of 


Pre-Hcd 


29. 


Middlcburv 


1 n decided 


30. 


I ni v. of [ i.Vs. i| 


Business Management 


31. 


Dartmouth 


Undecided 


32. 


Assumption 


Foreign Language 


33. 


Syracuse 


Electrical Engineering 


34. 


Univ. of Lowell 


Chemi*tr\ 


35. 


Boston College 


N iming 


16, 


Univ. of New Hampshire 


Computer Engineering 


37. 


UniV. of Vermont 


Engineering 


■.H 


Brigham Young Univerrity 


Economic* 


39. 


Univ. of Nrw llampthirr 


Computer Science 


w 


Univ, of Vermont 


Electrical Engineering 


41. 


Univ. of Vermont 


Biochemistry 


42. 


Univ. of Lowell 


Electrical Engineering 


43. 


Univ, of Lowell 


Math 


44. 


Cortland State 


Undecided 


45. 


r hchburg 


Communications 


46. 


Gouchcr 


Dance Therapy 


47. 


Babson 


Business/ Accounting 


48. 


Boston College 


Math 


49. 


Rensselaer Polytech 


l let nil jI Engineering 


50. 


Univ. of Lowell 


Nursing 


51. 


Providence College 


Math 


52. 


Buckncll 


Political Science 


53. 


Dartmouth 


Engineering 


54. 


Tufts 


Liberal Arts 


55. 


Rivier 


Executive Secretary 


56. 


Salem State College 


Math/Computer Science 


57. 


Univ. of Vermont 


Liberal Arts 


58. 


Rensselaer Polytech 


Management Studies 


59. 


Univ. of Lowell 


Science 


60. 


Univ. of Vermont 


Pre- Legal 


61. 


Fitchhurg State College 


Business Administration 


62. 


Univ. of Lowell 


Business Administration 



TOP SIXTY-TWO STUDENTS 
COLLEGE CHOICE SUMMARY 

A.F.S. 

Assumption 

Babson College 

Boston College 

Boston University 

Bowdoin 

Brandeis 

Brigham Young University 

Brown 

Bucknell 

California, Univ. of at Berkeley 

Case Western Reserve 

Clark 

Colgate 

Cornell 

Cortland State 

Dartmouth 

Fitchburg State 

Goucher 

Holy Cross, College of 

Lowell, University of 

Massachusetts, University of 

Mass. Institute of Technology 

Middlebury 

New Hampshire, University of 

Northeastern 

Ohio State 

Providence College 

Rensselaer Polytech Institute 

Rice 

Rivier 

Salem State 

Syracuse 

Tufts 

Vermont, University of 

Washington University at St. Louis 

Williams 

Worcester Polytech Institute 

TOP SIXTY-TWO STUDENTS 
SUMMARY OF CAREER PLANS 

American Studies 

A.F.S. 

Architecture 

Biochemistry 

Biology 

Business Management 

Chemistry 

Communications 

Computer Science 

Dance Therapy 

Kngincering 

Computer 

Chemical 

Electrical 
Economics 
Executive Secretary 
French 

Foreign Language 
Geology 



1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
7 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
6 
1 
1 
1 



53 



Liberal Arts 

Management Studies 

Math 

Nursing 

Political Science 

Pre-Med 

Psychology 

Science 

Sociology 

Undeclared 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT TESTING RESULTS 

School Year 1982-83 Test Date— May 1983 

61 Candidates took 95 exams 

No. of 
Colleges receiving A/P Scores (30) Reports 



Case Western Reserve University 

Assumption College 

University of New Hampshire 

Brown University 

Colgate University 

University of Lowell 

Mass. Institute of Technology 

Rensselaer Polytech Institute 

University of Mass. -Amherst 

Clark University 

Williams College 

Suffolk University 

Dartmouth College 

Tufts University /Jackson Colleges 

University of Rochester 

Boston University 

Cornell University 

Goucher College 

New York University-Undergrad. Div. 

Rice University 

University of Vermont 

Boston College 

Northeastern University 

Brandeis University 

University of California-Berkeley 

College of the Holy Cross 

Bowdoin College 

Clarkson College 

University of Notre Dame 

Worcester Polytech Institute 



1 
1 
5 
1 
2 
8 
1 
5 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
4 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Scores are reported on a scale ascending from one to 
five. College credit is usually granted for 3, 4, and 5; oc- 
casionally 2's receive limited recognition. 



Chelmsford High Scores: 








Score Range 










Low 




High 






Total 


Subject 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




Tests 


American History 





4 


4 


1 





5 


9 


Biology 








2 


1 





3 


3 


Chemistry 





4 


7 


1 


3 


11 


15 


English Comp & Lit. 





2 


2 





2 


4 


6 


English Lang & Comp 








5 


5 





10 


10 


French Language 





1 


5 


2 





7 


7 


Math-Calculus AB 





4 


12 


6 





18 


22 


Math-Calculus BC 


1 





4 


5 


6 


15 


16 


•Physics B 


1 


1 














2 


Spanish Language 








4 





1 


5 


5 


TOTALS 


2 


15 


45 


21 


12 


78 


95 


*AP Course not offered 82-83 








College 






College credit possible 


in 78 


out of 95 


tests 


taken 


Credit 
Possible 







FROM THE HOME ECONOMICS 
DEPARTMENT HEAD 

The goal of the Home Economics program is to pre- 
pare students to cope with daily living. The curriculum 
starts at the seventh grade level in a ten week co- 
educational course, emphasizing basic skills for family 
life. Foods and nutrition, sewing, building a good self im- 
age and human relations are stressed. The eighth grade 
course expands on this knowledge. Consumer awareness, 
decision making, machine sewing, comparison shopping 
and practical skills in the foods laboratory are included. 
Activities are designed to meet a wide range of student 
needs, interests and abilities. 

Since boys have been introduced to the Home Econo- 
mics program in the seventh and eighth grades, the 
Chefs course at the High School has become very popu- 
lar. Students are involved in food selection, preparation 
and the serving of meals. Careers in these categories are 
explored. Teachers from other disciplines are invited to 
give demonstrations of their culinary specialties. 

The Home Economics teachers attend workshops, in- 
service programs and courses offered through colleges in 
the area. Curriculum in the courses is constantly being 
revised and updated to keep abreast of current methods 
and products. A new child development course is being 
introduced in 1984 to include a preschool learning 
center. An International Foods Day at the Junior High is 
a yearly event, held in cooperation with the Foreign 
Language Department. 

The Home Economics Department strives to help each 
individual student to gain the skills and self-confidence to 
achieve a productive and fulfilling family life. 

FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

Chelmsford schools were cited as an outstanding system 
by a visiting committee of the New England Association 
of Schools and Colleges (NRACC) during its recent visit 
to Chelmsford for purposes of school accreditation. This 
commendation stems in part from the diversity of pro- 
grams offered to the students and the community. In- 
dustrial Arts plays a vital role in maintaining this diversi- 
ty with our courses providing life-sustaining instruction, 
avocational opportunities, vocational investigation, and 
consumer awareness. 

The importance of practical arts has been evidenced by 
the increase in the High School's graduation require- 
ments from ten to fifteen credits and in the co-ed pro- 
gram at the Junior High. The programs are continually 
evaluated to match the needs of the students and stay 
abreast of an ever-changing technical world. 

At the Junior High School, every student takes two one- 
term units, one in seventh grade and another in eighth. 
The seventh grade curriculum deals with safety in the 
laboratory, problem solving, product design and produc- 
tion, and the use of hand tools and power equipment 
(band saw, planer, radial arm saw, drill press and 



54 



sanders). The eighth grade curriculum covers coopera- 
tion in the workplace. A simulation of industry's 
production-line techniques involves students in product 
ideas and design, planning and production of jig and fix- 
tures, the flowcharting of products and production of a 
specific number of finished items. 

The High School program offers a choice of fifteen 
electives, ranging from full-year courses to semester 
courses and independent study. Our Industrial Arts I 
course is a full-year program divided into four one-term 
units (Basic Electricity, Woodworking, Metalworking 
and Technical Drawing). The other full-year courses are 
Technical Drawing I & II, Electronics I, II, and Indepen- 
dent Study; and Architectural Drawing I, II, and In- 
dependent Study. The semester courses include General 
Metals, Small Engine Repair, House Construction, Fine 
Furniture Construction, and General Drafting, which is a 
course for next year. 

By-products of these courses are services provided to 
the community, school and staff. Part of the Electronics, 
Small Engine Repair, House Construction, Fine Fur- 
niture, and Architectural Drawing courses are practical 
applications of course material. To place students in 
situations as close to "real" as possible, work is solicited 
from various sources. House Construction students 
design, construct, and assemble on-site storage sheds for 
people willing to buy the materials. Small Engine Repair 
students study theory, rebuild an engine, and trouble- 
shoot equipment. The troubleshooting unit needs equip- 
ment such as lawnmowers, rototillers, weed cutters, and 
pumps to repair. The only cost to the "customer" is for 
parts. Similar situations exist in Electronics and Drawing. 

The comprehensive Industrial Arts program is con- 
tinually being upgraded. New course offerings at the 
High School and some modifications of programs at the 
Junior High are some of the possibilities being considered 
to better serve the students and community. 

FROM THE SUPERVISOR 
OF INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA 

In each elementary school library the instructional pro- 
gram focused on how information is organized, how to 
locate and select appropriate materials, and the skills 
needed to use the available resources. Scavenger hunts 
and reference question search lessons continued to elicit 
good responses from the fifth and sixth gTade students. 
The unit on the use of the almanac was a popular exer- 
cise. The effectiveness of the library skills is evidenced by 
the fact that the sixth grade students performed on the 
reference question section of the Science Research 
Associates test at the gTade equivalent level of the seventh 
grade, ninth month, and at the 66.8 percentile. These 
tests were administered in the early fall of 1983, and the 
scores reflect what the students had learned by the end of 
the fifth grade. 

Story hours have been a traditional part of the elemen- 
tary library program, and their scope has grown to in- 
clude book reviews, book talks and discussions about 
authors. Some story hours were videotaped and broadcast 



over cable television. At the South Row School, all grades 
were involved in story hours. At the Harrington School, 
the students enjoyed read-to-yourself sessions. The "ques- 
tion of the week" contest was popular at the Westlands 
School. The Parker School library held a book fair. In- 
struction on how to use computers fascinated students at 
the Byam School. As in the past, a great deal of research 
was done by the students, particularly by those in grades 
four through six. Trivia quizzes, chess, backgammon, 
checkers tournaments, favorite book contests and book 
mark design competitions were popular. Displays of stu- 
dent work — book reports, dioramas, art work and puppet 
shows — added another dimension. 

At the close of the school year, every elementary stu- 
dent was given a summer reading list of books available at 
both the school and public libraries. A series of work- 
shops was held for the library assistants. These were con- 
cerned with how to prepare annual reports, how to teach 
students search strategies, developing students' library 
skills, and methods of book selection. 

The McCarthy Junior High School library was the 
scene of much activity. Library orientation tours were 
given to all seventh grade students, introducing them to 
both the browsing collection housed in Room 213, and 
the reference and non-fiction collection in Room 206. 
These tours were conducted under the auspices of the 
English Department. 

Throughout the year, teachers brought their classes to 
the reference/non-fiction collection for research. During 
these visitations, the librarian gave informal instruction, 
generally to small gToups, and frequently on a person-to- 
person basis. A total of 349 such classes was conducted. 
The English Department's "oral communications" unit, 
which involves all eighth grade students, placed a heavy 
demand on the library. The unit required students to 
review their library skills, fostering the development of 
search strategies. The librarian became actively involved 
in teaching the whole gamut of library science and helped 
students in preparing their research papers. 

An active reading program, conducted by the English 
Department and the six reading teachers, created a great 
need for paperback books, which comprise 80-85% of the 
total book circulation. 

A four-day paperback book fair was held in November; 
a repeat performance is planned for the next school year. 

A helpful cadre of student helpers was formed to work 
at the circulation desk, shelve books and prepare overdue 
book notices. In addition, there were two volunteer 
mothers who did much to assist the library program. 

Because of the asbestos removal effort during the sum- 
mer vacation, all library materials in Room 206 were 
packed in cartons labeled to facilitate re-shelving in the 
fall. 

The total circulation figure for the year was, 16,510 
items, 3,250 more than in 1981-82. This figure includes 
periodicals and audio visual materials as well as books. 



55 



The High School library continued to meet the grow- 
ing demands for services and materials. The library was 
open from 7:45 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. Monday through Fri- 
day, with hours extended to 3:00 P.M. on Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday afternoons. Library services 
were expanded to accommodate High School and Mc- 
Carthy students working on History Day projects. 

During the year, approximately 1,500 students used 
the library facilities each day. Faculty members reserved 
time and space in the library for their classes to do 
research; an average of three classes a day were schedul- 
ed, while at times the number rose to ten. Collections of 
books on specific subjects were placed on reserve to 
facilitate research for these students. Upon request, the 
librarian provided instruction on library usage, reference 
sources and periodicals research methods. Early in the 
school year, all ninth grade students were given orienta- 
tion tours of the library. 

The service study course for student assistants was an 
important aspect of the program. The thirty-five students 
who enrolled gained practical experience and a sense of 
belonging while the library benefited from their services. 
At the Senior Academic Awards Night, the library 
awarded prizes to two outstanding seniors for their excep- 
tional contributions. 

Other activities included the construction of a perma- 
nent gallery for the display of students' studio art, and 
ongoing displays of student projects in English, Fashion 
Merchandising, History, Industrial Arts, Reading and 
Science. Meetings, whose purpose was to explore 
cooperative efforts and information exchange, were held 
with elementary, junior high, high school and public 
libraries. A total of 1,550 books and 340 materials were 
added to the collection. Newspaper and periodical 
subscriptions, as well as the collection of microfilms ex- 
panded opportunities for student research. 

The total circulation figure of 10,043 volumes for the 
school year does not reflect the tremendous on-site use of 
the reference and general collection during student visita- 
tions to the library. 

Working with students and faculty, the graphic artist 
provided a variety of services for the school system. 
Overhead transparencies and graphics were created for 
School Committee and Finance Committee meetings. 
Sound/slide programs, transparencies, audio tapes and 
other instructional materials were produced upon request 
for faculty members and students. The sixteen-millimeter 
collection was repaired and inspected on a regular basis, 
helping to prolong the life of this resource. 

The repair technician performed a multitude of func- 
tions, repairing projectors, television sets, filmstrip pro- 
jectors, while maintaining the public address system in 
every school. During the summer months, he systemati- 
cally cleaned and repaired, where necessary, all audio 
visual equipment in the system. 

The central cataloging office continued to serve the 
whole school library system, cataloging and processing all 



items added to the schools' collections. The central files 
were kept up-to-date in anticipation of computerizing 
their stored information in the future. The cataloger and 
a clerical assistant spent many hours entering the audio 
visual software on data on a computer, looking toward 
the publication of a computerized list of all data for every 
school and thus making each item more accessible for 
borrowing. The centralized collection of audio visual 
software — filmstrip, films, video tapes, soundfilmstrips 
and recordings housed in the High School — was heavily 
drawn upon. 

With the burgeoning of printed and non- printed infor- 
mation, it becomes increasingly important for students to 
know how information is organized and how to locate it 
in whatever form it is to be found. This is one of the goals 
of the library instructional curriculum. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF 
LANGUAGE ARTS/READING/BASIC SKILLS 

Basic Skills 

Chelmsford's system-wide Basic Skills Improvement 
Program provides the framework for curriculum design, 
staff development, competency testing, and follow-up in- 
structional programs in reading, writing, mathematics, 
and listening. Basic skills curriculum guides which ex- 
plain the program are available in all school libraries. 
This information will be helpful to parents who want to 
know more about the nature and scope of the Basic Skills 
Improvement Program. 

Basic Skills encompass all aspects of the educational 
process and go far beyond focusing on achievement at a 
minimum competency level. Accordingly, we have ex- 
panded our basic skills program to include study skills. In 
October, 1983, a system-wide Study Skills Committee was 
organized to review and select appropriate study skills 
materials for implementation in all content areas. The 
committee consists of twenty-seven staff members in- 
cluding teachers, specialists, and administrators. The 
final report of the committee will be completed in 
August, 1984. 

A state mandate requires local school districts to test 
for minimum competency in reading, writing, mathe- 
matics, and listening at both elementary and secondary 
levels. Chelmsford meets this requirement by testing for 
reading, writing, and mathemtics in grades 3, 5 and 8, 
and for listening in grades 2, 4, and 7. The results of 
basic skills testing for the 1982-83 school year were 
positive and reassuring, showing overall progress in all 
areas tested. The test results in listening were especially 
noteworthy with close to 100 percent of all students pass- 
ing the test. 

Indications are that the Massachusetts Department of 
Education intends to play a greater role in setting stan- 
dards and in expanding required testing for local school 
districts during the coming years. 



56 



Language Arts 

Chelmsford's writing program consists of word, 
sentence, and paragraph objectives for each grade level 
from kindergarten to grade 12. To monitor the progress 
of each student in writing, student folders containing 
selected writing samples were kept in grades 3 to 12. Our 
writing program has received national recognition from 
the National Council of Teachers of English and has been 
adopted by many school systems throughout the country. 

The High School is to be congratulated for winning the 
first place national award from Columbia Press Associa- 
tion for its newsmagazine, The Voice. Ninth grade 
students and teachers are also to be congratulated for 
coming within one point of the thirty top high schools in 
the country in the English Olympiad. The Olympiad con- 
sists of standardized tests in the mechanical skills of 
writing, including grammar and punctuation. 

Under the direction of the newly appointed depart- 
ment head, the ninth grade English program was com- 
pletely revised during a summer workshop. A multi-genre 
approach was established, with appropriate core readings 
for each academic level. It should also be noted that all 
high school English teachers have written course syllabi 
which were issued to parents, along with the student's 
first quarter mid-term report. Every course syllabus in- 
cludes attendance policies, materials required, home- 
work assignments, makeup policies, grading procedures, 
and a description of the course's content. 

To facilitate the teaching of language arts in areas 
other than English and reading, the Junior High School 
science teachers developed materials in a summer work- 
shop for incorporating reading, writing, and listening 
skills into seventh and eighth grade science lessons. The 
lessons, developed for all ability levels, provide specific 
procedures for teaching basic skills. 

Reading 

Chelmsford's curriculum guides for reading and listen- 
ing follow the same format as the curriculum guide for 
writing— presenting a sequence of objectives for each 
grade level. The specifications for reading and listening 
provided by the Massachusetts Department of Education 
were used as the basis for generating the objectives. The 
objectives are skill focused, making it possible for 
teachers in all subject areas to reinforce each other's ef- 
forts in teaching reading and listening. 

The Basal Text Chart, a guide developed by elemen- 
tary teachers to assist in the selection of appropriate 
reading materials, indicates by grade level and ability 
group the basal texts that meet the required objectives. 
This ensures the consistent use of materials within a par- 
ticular building and from building to building. It also 
eliminates the possibility of duplication of books for 
children who may be assigned to a different school in the 
future. 

Last February, all elementary schools successfully par- 
ticipated in the MS READaTHON, a national program 



to raise money for multiple sclerosis. The program calls 
for children to find sponsors for each book that they read. 
The MS READaTHON is endorsed by The International 
Reading Organization and the United States Office of 
Education. 

The secondary reading program consists of three levels 
— remedial, developmental and enrichment. The courses 
meet the needs of the full range of student abilities. Each 
reading course is highly structured with required pre- 
and post-testing, proven management techniques, and 
specific objectives. Student progress is monitored through 
individual reading folders. Test results have shown that 
the secondary reading program has been extremely suc- 
cessful in helping students to overcome deficiencies in 
reading. 

To promote the development of higher level reading 
skills in grades 3 to 12, ten teachers from both elementary 
and secondary levels participated in the Leader Training 
Course for Great Books. The Great Books is a program of 
interpretive reading and discussion that encourages 
students to read critically and to support their views with 
evidence. 

Despite Proposition 2 V£ , declining enrollment, increas- 
ed class size, and limited resources, the Chelmsford 
School System continues to do an excellent job of pro- 
viding students with varied opportunities to grow to the 
fullest of their potential as readers, writers, listeners, and 
speakers. To maintain the quality and high standard of 
education in Chelmsford, however, requires continued 
concern for, commitment to, and support of educational 
programs that meet the needs and interests of all 
students. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF 
MATHEMATICS/COMPUTER SCIENCE: 

The elementary mathematics program continues to 
emphasize the basic skills needed by our students to suc- 
ceed in junior high and high school mathematics. 

In addition to the normal elementary program, an ex- 
perimental continuous progress program is being tried at 
the Bvam School. In conjunction with this, we are using a 
new computerized management system to help track stu- 
ilint progress. If this system proves effective, it will be in- 
troduced at other schools. 

This year, through the use of block grant funds, we 
have been able to meet our goals of installing four 
microcomputers at each elementary school, allowing 
greater hands on experience for the students. Over the 
past year, a great deal of in-house teacher training has 
been completed, leading to more effective use of the com- 
puters in the classroom. 

The Junior High mathematics program continues to 
offer diversified courses, ranging from remedial to an ad- 
vanced course in geometry. Over the past year, we have 
had a successful basic skills follow-up program to provide 
help for students who failed the State basic skills test. 
This program has reduced by two-thirds the number of 



57 



students who have not achieved passing scores. 

At present, a computer unit is being developed which 
will be added to the mathematics curriculum in 
September. This year, five microcomputers for the Junior 
High were bought with block grant funds, and we are 
planning to add ten more next year. 

The mathematics and computer science programs at 
the High School continue to provide students with the 
knowledge necessary to deal with our increasingly 
technical society. This summer Chelmsford High was 
selected to take part in the Northeast Regional 
Exchange's "Study of Exemplary Mathematics 
Programs." And a complete revision was made of courses 
for non-college bound students. With a thirty-credit 
graduation requirement in mathematics, it is vital that a 
comprehensive and attainable program be presented to 
these students. 

There has been a large increase in the numbers of 
students taking computer courses. A new course added to 
the computer curriculum will prepare students for the 
new CEEB Advanced Placement Computer exam which 
will be given for the first time in May. 

FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The Physical Education curriculum is a progressive se- 
quence of activities tailored for the needs and abilities of 
students at various age levels. This fall, several workshops 
were held to discuss revisions of the curriculum, and 
plans for a summer workshop are in the making. The 
workshop's purpose is to expand the overall program, em- 
phasize self-testing regimens, and pursue a health-related 
physical fitness program. 

The elementary school curriculum stresses the explora- 
tion of individual skills and development, leading up to 
sport skills and athletic activities. Sportsmanship and 
social spirit are also stressed. 

The junior high curriculum continues the development 
of team sports and physical fitness, with the addition of 
individual and dual sports and Project Adventure— a 
self-testing and trust experience. The program is elective. 

During the course of this year, the Junior High School 
participated in the National Children and Youth Fitness 
Study conducted by the U.S. Office of Disease Prevention 
and Health Promotion. The testing program was design- 
ed to compile national data on the physical fitness of 
youth for the first time since 1975. In addition to the 
benefits of being involved in the study itself, the school 
received permanent possession of the testing equipment 
used in the study for use in its own physical education 
program. The emphasis in fitness testing is changing 
from athletic-related fitness to a health-related fitness ap- 
proach. 

The high school curriculum is made up of individual, 
dual and team sports, as well as a variety of conditioning 
and fitness activities. Karate, Ti Chi, and self-defense are 



offered on a limited basis. At present, the curriculum 
comprises 26 different activities offered on an elective 
basis. Major emphasis is placed on lifetime activity sports. 

Proposition 2'/6 hit the high school physical education 
program very hard. Staff cuts resulted in the cancellation 
of the junior-senior physical education program and an 
increase in class size, resulting in a pared down cur- 
riculum. At present, the junior-senior program has been 
restored on a limited, once-a-week basis, as mandated by 
the State; the elective program has begun to be reinsti- 
tuted; and curriculum revisions are being investigated. 
However, class size and the one-period-a-week program 
for the juniors and seniors still remain as obstacles that 
continue to weaken the physical education program. 

Every school also has an intramural program in which 
students can further enjoy activities and improve their 
skills. The extent and variety of each program is depen- 
dent on the availability of staff and transportation, and 
on space limitations. 

FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF JUNIOR HIGH SCIENCE 

The Junior High program teaches Life Science and 
Earth Science in the seventh and eighth grades, thus ex- 
tending the elementary program and producing greater 
understanding of the interdependence of life and its 
home, the earth. 

The Junior High staff has been developing new cur- 
ricula in two areas this year. First, increased awareness, 
reinforcement and incorporation of basic skills in the 
classroom and curriculum have become a major objec- 
tive. Second, a part of the continuous updating and revi- 
sion of the program, members of the department have 
been attending workshops, writing curricula, testing 
computer software, and integrating computers into the 
science classroom. 

The major goals of the department are to obtain more 
computers and computer software and to keep abreast of 
the new trends in studies for the Junior High. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR 
OF SOCIAL STUDIES 

Students entering High School have the opportunity to 
select from a developed sequence of social studies courses; 
few are required, most are elective. Three years of social 
studies are needed for graduation from Chelmsford High 
School. 

Nineteen social studies courses comprise a balance of 
history, social science and interdisciplinary studies. 
Students are encouraged to take courses in each of these 
areas. Most students elect social studies in each of their 
four years at Chelmsford High. 

A typical social studies progression in grades nine 
through twelve would be as follows: 

• Political science in grade 9: required for all 
students 



58 



A world history course in grade 10: selection from 
several electives 



FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR OF 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 



• United States history in grade 11: selection from 
several options to meet the State requirements 

• Social science, history or interdisciplinary electives 
in grades 12. 

This progression prepares our students for further post- 
secondary study. It also offers substantial choices for 
those entering the job market after high school. 

Social studies courses cover four levels of skill and abili- 
ty. Level One courses are for Honors and Advanced 
Placement (AP) studies. Honors courses are offered in 
world and United States history, law and Asian studies. 
Advanced Placement courses are given in United States 
and European history. 

Level Two courses are for students with above- average 
skills and ability who intend to continue their studies 
after high school. Most of the social studies courses are of- 
fered at this level. 

Level Three courses benefit students who are going on 
to further post-secondary education but who may read 
more slowly and may need additional instruction in basic 
skills. Many of the social studies courses are also available 
on this level. 

Level Four courses, designed primarily for students 
entering careers after graduation, stress basic skills, in- 
cluding life skills of value in both employment and per- 
sonal life. These courses include: consumer economics, 
legal rights and responsibilities, modern problems, and 
Level Four classes in political science, world and United 
States history. 

In its aim to meet the needs of every student. 
Chelmsford High offers more social studies courses than 
almost any other high school in the Commonwealth. The 
social studies courses are listed below. 

SUMMARY OF SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES 



HISTORY 

Full Year 
Ancient History 

World Hisiory H 

(Inquiry) 
Modern History A 
Modem History 

Modern History B 

European History AP 
American History AP 

U.S. Hisiory H 
U.S. History A 

(Inquiry) 
U.S. History A 
U.S. History 
U.S. History B 



AP (Advanced Placement) 

H (Honors) 

A (Above Average and College Preparatory) 

B (Non-college) 



SOCIAL SCIENCES 

One Semester 
Economics 

Consumer Economics 

Psychology 
Legal Rights & 
Responsibilities 
Comprehensive Studv of 
the Law |H) (Sem IMI 
Full Year 
Political Science A 

Political Science 
Political Science B 



IN I r RIHStlPl IS\m 
One Semester 
Computerized 
Social Science 
Art & Am hiiei lure 
in America iSem III 
Ameru an Studies' 
Asian Studies' 1 1 ( 
iSem I) 



hull Yea, 
International 
Relations 
Modern Problems 



Since September, 1974, the Special Education Depart- 
ment has implemented Chapter 766, The Massachusetts 
Comprehensive Special Education Law of 1972. In 
September 1978, P.L. 94-142, the Education of the 
Handicapped Children act became effective. Both laws 
entitle special needs students the right to a free and ap- 
propriate education. Students, ages three through 
twentv-one years, who have not received a high school 
diploma or its equivalent, and who have been determined 
by the evaluation Team to have a special need, are eligi- 
ble for special education services. 

The Chelmsford Special Education Department began 
the September, 1983. school year with 678 students 
registered to receive special education services — 11.1 per- 
cent of Chelmsford's total school enrollment, an increase 
of .9 percent over the 1982-83 school year. 

Chelmsford has a comprehensive program to serve the 
special needs children in our community. To develop and 
implement the individualized educational plans, the staff 
includes specialists in learning disabilities, speech 
pathology, adaptive physical education, occupational 
therapy, visual impairment, hearing impairment, psych- 
ological services, social services, and vocational services. 
For students who require more specialized educational 
programs, there are twelve resource classes staffed by 
special education teachers who are assisted by instruc- 
tional aides. Private day and residential schools provide 
students with severe learning and or emotional needs. 

In September. 1983. the Special Education Depart- 
ment began to computerize all report data required by 
the State Department of Education. This will enable staff 
to retrieve data for state reports as well as information for 
the servicing of students as required by Chapter 766. 

The Merrimack Special Education Collaborative, in 
which Chelmsford participates, continues to provide ef- 
fective and cost -efficient programs for children with low- 
incidence disabilities. Classes, held in Dracut. Billerica, 
and Tewksbury. serve the needs of children from Chelms- 
ford. Billerica, Dracut. Tewksbury and Westford. 

For the current school year, the Chelmsford Special 
Education Department has a budget of SI .676,005.00. In 
addition, the town will receive SI 30, 749.00 from the 
federal government for educational and vocational pro- 
grams. 

The department provides a variety of pre-vocational 
and vocational programs. The Center for Occupational 
Awareness and Placement (Project CO. A. P.), a collab- 
orative program, has placed students in on-site jobs. 
After completing the CO. A. P. Program, students have 
been able to obtain full-time employment. The depart- 
ment considers pre-vocational and vocational programs 
as a priority and will continue its efforts to expand these 
opportunities for the special needs students. 



59 



The administrative staff has written a staff manual 
describing policies, procedures, and programs. It is avail- 
able in every school. 

The Special Needs Service Booklet describing the 
Chapter 766 process and services for parents, students, 
and community members is available at the McKay and 
Adams libraries and at the Special Education Office. 

CONCLUSION (By the Superintendent) 

The year 1984-85 will bring new challenges and pro- 
blems. As we plan for the future, our concern for the 
economy of the town, state and nation emphasizes the 
need of total commitment from all facets of the com- 
munity in order to guarantee the best use of the tax 
dollars and still achieve excellence in educational pro- 
grams and opportunities. The School Committee has 
continued to effect economies in the development of the 
1984-85 budget with a clearer documentation and 
presentation of program needs related to budget requests 
and declining enrollments. The School Committee 
recognizes that qualitative dimensions of the school 
system's programs can only be measured in terms of what 
the town wants and how it values the return on its invest- 
ment. 

There must continue to be shared responsibilities with 
students, parents, teachers, administrators and school 
committee working together. With the commitment of 
Chelmsford school personnel, parents, students and 
citizens, one cannot help but feel a sense of confidence 
that Chelmsford can and will meet these challenges. 

Sincere thanks for their cooperation and support are 
once again extended to all who have assisted us in any 



way— all town boards and committees; school personnel; 
police, fire and highway departments; parent-teacher 
organizations; League of Women Voters; Chelmsford 
Women Jaycees; Chelmsford Elks; Rotary and other ser- 
vice organizations; advisory study committees; school 
volunteer workers, and citizens. 

The School Committee wishes to extend its deep ap- 
preciation for the years of loyal, and meritorious service 
of the following staff members who retired in 1983. 

Eunice Gray, Grade 5 Teacher, South Row School 
Francis Larkin, Custodian, Parker School 
George Eastman, Custodian, Byam School 
Maureen Long, School Food Service, High School 

The community and the school department were griev- 
ed to learn this past year of the deaths of the former assis- 
tant principal of the High School, one of the McCarthy 
Junior High School housemasters, and a teacher of 
mathematics. These fine people held the love and respect 
of everyone. They will long be remembered for their 
dedication to the students and staff, past and present of 
the Chelmsford Public Schools. 



IN MEMORIAM 

Miss C. Edith McCarthy 

former vice principal, High School 

Mr. John "Jack" Sargent 
housemaster, McCarthy Jr. High School 

Mr. Thomas DeLuca 

McCarthy Junior High School teacher of mathematics 



SEWER COMMISSION 

The following is the Annual Report for the year ending 
December, 1983. 

The Sewer Commission is pleased to report on their 
progress to date regarding the Facilities Plan for 
Wastewater Management currently being conducted for 
the Town by Weston & Sampson Engineers, Inc. 

On September 26, 1983, the Commission held the se- 
cond Public Meeting on the Project, at which time the 
alternative solutions available to the Town to solve its 
wastewater disposal problems were discussed. (The loca- 
tion and extent of the Town's wastewater disposal pro- 
blems areas had been discussed at a previous Public 
Meeting.) The meeting was well attended. Those in at- 
tendance learned of the options and relative costs of the 
wastewater management techniques available to the 
Town, on a neighborhood-by-neighborhood basis. The 
Commission gained additional information from those 
residents in attendance that will be useful in fine-tuning 
the proposed sewer service area. The Commission will 
also attempt to incorporate the input received at the 
Meeting concerning methods of allocating local costs (i.e. 
betterment assessments and user fees) in the final financ- 



ing and implementation plan, which is to be developed in 
concert with other Town Boards and Commissions. 

Following the Public Meeting, the Commission and its 
engineers met with State officials prior to detailed 
development of the selected plan. The State gave its 
preliminary approval of the plan, as well as an indication 
as to those facilities that would be eligible for State and 
Federal grants. 

A Final Public Hearing, tentatively scheduled for 
March, 1984, will be held to discuss the plan in detail. 
The overall wastewater collection system plan, and 
associated construction costs, typical homeowner costs, 
and financing and implementation arrangements will be 
presented at that time. Public input will be solicited and 
taken into consideration by the Commission to insure that 
the selected plan reflects the best interests of the entire 
Town. 

The Commission anticipates including the necessary 
Articles on the Annual Town Meeting Warrant to ap- 
propriate the local share of funds necessary for design, 
and possibly construction of the initial phases of the pro- 
ject. It is assumed that the design will be completed in 
one year. 



60 



During the past year, Town Meeting voters approved 
an Article requiring sewer abutters to connect to the 
sewer system within one year of completion of construc- 
tion. This will ensure that existing pollution sources will 
be promptly eliminated, and that State and Federal reim- 
bursements of a portion of the lateral and interceptor 
sewer costs will be expedited. In addition, an Article was 
passed which authorizes the Sewer Commission to 
negotiate with the City of Lowell to provide for 
wastewater conveyance and treatment at the Duck Island 
Wastewater Treatment Plant. The Commission has met 
with Lowell officials toward development of a mutually 
acceptable Inter-Municipal Agreement. 

The Sewer Commission will continue to strive toward 
completing and implementing a reasonable and affor- 
dable plan that will insure proper treatment and disposal 
of wastewater from all sources within the Town. Such a 
plan will eliminate the contamination of surface water 
and groundwater within the Town, and eliminate the 
very real threat to our drinking water supplies. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Roberta Doukszewicz —Junior Clerk 
Marian Doyle — Part-Time Clerk 

This past year saw quite a situation develop when the 
property tax bills could not be mailed out before 
12-31-83. All staff were busy at year's end, but we ap- 
preciated the large response by the taxpayers. Some 
51,750,000.00 was voluntarily paid towards the tax bills 
not yet issued, and this helped the town avert a longer 
borrowing cycle. 

Many back levy years were also serviced in the excise 
area, resulting in many license suspensions, and many ac- 
counts being paid. 

Lands were sold after foreclosure to developer Ray- 
mond Carye at an auction held on lots off Turnpike 
Road. Future development of these lots should help the 
growth revenues of the town in upcoming tax years. 

Many pieces of property in tax-title will be foreclosed 
in 1984, and another group of properties will be liened as 
well. 



CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 

John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 

Burton A. Segall. Vice Chairman 

Dennis J. Ready, Clerk 



Respectfully submitted, 

James R. Doukszewicz 
Treasurer & Tax Collector 



TREASURER & TAX COLLECTOR 



TREE DEPARTMENT 



Balance as of July 1, 1982 
Receipts thru June 30. 1983 

Paid on warrants 

Balance as of June 30. 1983 



$ 4.263.973.00 
56,923.349.00 

(51,173,984.00) 

$10,013,338.00 



BREAKDOWN OF BALANCE 
AS OF JUNE 30, 1983: 
Cash in Banks'* $9,740,821.00 

Certificates of Deposit 00.00 

Federal Revenue Sharing Funds 61,798.00 

Non Revenue Funds* 210.719.00 



$10,013,338.00 



*These funds are the unexpended proceeds from Bond 
Issues 

**Funds in Money Market Accounts included in this 
figure 



This past year we have continued with our safety prun- 
ing and elevating program. 

Our work is done by a hired contractor, usually in the 
winter months, except for our emergency work. More 
could be done, but I feel, at present, we can keep the 
town reasonably safe with our present budget. 

I would like to thank those who have assisted me in the 
past and hope for continued cooperation with other town 
departments. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Donald P. Gray 
Tree Warden 



See Town Accountant balance sheet for all uncollected 
levies by years. 



DEPARTMENT MEMBERS 

Jim Doukszewicz — Town Treasurer & Tax Collector 
Florence Ramsay — Asst. Town Treasurer 
Margaret Mullen -Dept. Asst. to Tax Collector 
Lorraine Parkhurst— Principal Clerk (Treas.) 
Joan Bolvig — Computer Operator 



61 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Town Accountant 

Ernest F. Day Term Expires 1985 

Board of Selectmen's Executive Secretary 

Norman E. Thidemann Term Expires 1984 

Town Counsel 

James M. Harrington, Esq. Term Expires 1984 

Police Chief 
Raymond P. McKeon Term Expires 1984 

Deputy Police Chiefs 

Pennryn D. Fitts James C. Greska 



Assistant Town Clerk 
Elizabeth D. Zamanakos 



Assistant Treasurer 

Florence M . Ramsay 



Fire Chief 



Frederick H . Reid 



James A. Sousa 



Deputy Fire Chief 



Cemetery Superintendent 
George E. Baxendale Term Expires 1984 

Park Superintendent 

Donald P. Gray Term Expires 1984 

Director of Public Health 

Richard J. Day Term Expires 1984 

Assistant Director of Public Health 

John P. Emerson Term Expires 1984 

Board of Health Physician 
Michael A. Gilchrist, M.D. Term Expires 1984 

Superintendent of Streets 
Harold E. Gray Term Expires 1984 

Inspector of Animals 

Dr. Martin A. Gruber Term Expires 1984 

Building Inspector 

Ronald W. Wetmore Term Expires 1984 

Local Inspector 

Bruce H. Clark Term Expires 1984 

Wiring Inspector 

Francis E. Cunningham Term Expires 1984 

Gas Inspector 

Neal C. Stanley Term Expires 1984 

Plumbing Inspector 

William H . Shedd Term Expires 1 984 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Anthony C. Ferreira Term Expires 1984 

Town Aide and Council on Aging 
Kathleen M. Robinson Term Expires 1984 



Planning Board Clerk Board of Selectmen's Clerks 

Christine Gleason Judith E. Carter 

Jacqueline A. Sheehy (Resigned) Evelyn L. Newman 

Board of Appeals Clerk Finance Committee Clerk 

Conservation Commission Clerk Sharon Galpin 

Marjorie Hennessy 

Insect Pest Control Officer 

Donald P. Gray 

Superintendent of Public Buildings 

William W. Edge 

Veterans' Graves Officer 
George E. Baxendale 

Veteran's Agent 

Mary K. McAuliffe 



Dog Officer 

Frank Wotjas, Jr. 



Part-time Dog Officer 

Neal Stanley, Jr. 



Highway Department Foremen 

Pearl Koulas Arthur Deschaine Frederick Greenwood 



62 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
BALANCE SHEET— JUNE 30, 1983 

REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
ASSETS 



Transfers Authorized: 



Cash: 

General: 

In Banks 

Federal Revenue Sharing: 
Invested 

Accounts Receivable: 

Taxes: 

Levy of 1976 



Personal Property 


3.586. 




Real Estate 


363. 




Levy of 1977 






Personal Property 


3.255. 




Real Estate 


1.953. 




Levy of 1978 






Personal Property 


7.021. 




Real Estate 


5.006. 




Levy of 1979 






Personal Property 


9.492. 




Real Estate 


4.611. 




Levy of 1980 






Personal Property 


10.406. 




Real Estate 


17.851. 




Levy of 1981 






Personal Propertv 


13.303. 




Real Estate 


37.472. 




Levy of 1982 






Personal Property 


16.840. 




Real Estate 


116.556. 




Levy of 1983 






Personal Property 


37.694. 




Real Estate 


1.003.069. 


1.288.478. 


Motor Vehicle Excise: 






Levy of 197S 


347. 




Levy of 1974 


357. 




Levy of 1975 


3.925. 




Levy of 1976 


42.461. 




Levy of 1977 


43.383. 




Levy of 1978 


42.292. 




Levy of 1979 


55.172. 




Levy of 1980 


55.868. 




Levy of 1981 


27.342. 




Levy of 1982 


31.492. 




Levy of 1983 


180.680. 


483.319 


Farm Animal Excise: 






Levy of 1981 


195. 




Levy of 1982 


216. 




Levy of 198S 


Ill 


522 


Tax Titles and Possessions: 






Tax Titles 


112.286. 




Tax Possessions 


19.292. 


131.578 


Departmental: 






Off Duty Work Details 


40.429. 




Public Buildings 


150. 




Cemetery 


6.633. 


47.212 


Water Districts: 






Lien Added to Taxes: 






Levy of 1981 


66 




Levy of 1982 


241. 




Levy of 1983 


666. 


973 


Aid To Highways: 






State 




284.671 


Loans Authorized: 






Sewer Construction 


1.200.000. 




School Building Improvements 


358.037. 


1.558.037 





Revenue Sharing 
Perpetual Care Trust 
Stabilization Fund 


280,674. 

15.000. 

682.710. 


978.384. 




Underestimated Assessments: 
Mosquito Control 
Regional Transit Authority 


855. 
388. 


1.243. 


9.740.821. 


Revenue: 

Appropriations Voted For 
Fiscal 1984 




26,429,154. 
$41,006,190 


61.798. 






LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 






Warrants Payable 




7.059.992. 




Payroll Deductions 




376,729. 



Guarantee Deposits: 
Planning Board 
School Department 
Public Buildings 

Tailings: 

Unclaimed Checks 

Agency: 

County - Dog Licenses 

Sale of Real Estate 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 

Gifts from Individuals: 
Library Carriage House 
Library Department 
Cemetery Department 
Recreation Department 

Federal and Slate Grants: 
Revenue Sharing 
Department of EPA 
Department of MEOER 
Department of HUD 
Public Law 81 874 
Other School Grants 

Revolving Funds: 
School Lunch 
School • Athletics 
School Civic Activities 
School Adult Education 
School Loss of Books 
School Summer School 
Merrimack Education Center 
Recreation Commission 

Loans Authorized and Unissued 

Appropriation Balances Forwarded 

Appropriations Authorized From: 
Federal Revenue Sharing: 
Fire Salaries 
Police Salaries 
Sidewalks- Acton Road 
Preliminary Project Studies 

Perpetual Care Trust: 
Cemetery Department 

Stabilization Fund: 
Resurface Streets 
Highway Equipment 
Police Equipment 
Fire Equipment 
School Equipment 
North School Property 
Renovations 

Reserve Fund -Overlay Surplus 



1,850. 

1.500. 

900. 



3.586. 

4. 

250. 

550. 

61.798. 
48.967. 
106. 
1.080. 
26,890. 
11.356. 

74.932. 

321. 

10.061. 

717. 

4.467. 

28.415. 

2.426. 

1.632. 



120.000. 

120.000. 

40.016. 

658. 

15.000. 

265.652. 
91.000. 
76.058. 
28.000. 
22.000. 

200.000. 



4.250, 

17.722. 

911. 

4.767. 

15.082. 



4.390. 



150.197. 



122.971. 

1.558.037. 

672.028. 



978.384. 
67.097. 



63 



Overlay Reserved for Abatements: 






Levy of 1979 


17,872. 




Levy of 1980 


48.889. 




Levy of 1981 


46,595. 




Levy of 1982 


51,474. 




Levy of 1983 


21,921. 


186.751. 


Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 






Motor Vehicle Excise 


483,319. 




Farm Animal Excise 


522. 




Tax Titles & Possessions 


131.578. 




Departmental 


47,212. 




Aid To Highways 


284,671. 




Water Liens 


973. 


948,275. 


Overestimated Assessments: 






County Tax 


11,987. 




Special Education 


4,146. 




State Parks 


8,311. 




Air Pollution 


1,413. 


25,857. 


Surplus Revenue: 






Restricted 


799,593. 




Unrestricted 


1,558,416. 


2,358,009. 


Appropriation Control Fiscal 1984: 






Revenue 


26,429,154. 




Transfers 


25,587. 


26.454,741. 
$41,006,190. 



NON-REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
June 30, 1983 



Cash — In Banks 



Appropriation Balances: 

School Building Improvements 
School Computer Purchase 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt: 
Inside Debt Limit 

General: 
Outside Debt Limit 

General: 



Serial Loans and Notes: 
Inside Debt Limit 
General : 
Schools 
Outside Debt Limit 
General: 
Schools 



210,719. 



210,719. 



208,425. 
2,294. 



210,719. 



473,061. 
1,510,000 



1,983,061. 



473,061. 



1,510,000. 



1,983,061. 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

June 30, 1983 

Trust and Investment Funds: 
Cash and Securities: 
In Custody of Treasurer 
In Custody of Library Trustees 
In Custody of Board of Selectmen 
In Custody of Veterans Emergency 
Fund Committee 



In Custody of Treasurer: 
Geo. W. Barris-Varney 

Playground 3,722. 

Conservation Fund 49,911. 

Conservation-Wright Reservation 2,642. 



1,964,139. 

86,706. 

661. 

9,363. 


2,060,869. 



Stabilization Fund 


1,457,739. 




Insurance Sinking Fund 


53,874. 




Cemetery Funds: 






Geo. W. Barris Memorial 


8,052. 




Perpetual Care 


367,275. 




Adams Emerson 


862. 




Christopher Roby 


11,758. 




Vileata S. Douglas 


7,304. 




Baptist Pond Cemetery 


1,000. 


1,964,139, 


In Custody of Library Trustees: 






Amos F. Adams 


26,003. 




Geo. W. Barris 


482. 




Frances Clark 


3,690. 




Clement Fund 


19,886. 




Albert H. Davis 


1,048. 




Frederick B. Edwards 


5,104. 




Nathan B. Edwards 


1,054. 




Victor E. Edwards 


1,739. 




Adam Emerson 


213. 




Ora Flint 


4,967. 




George Memorial 


2,683. 




Thomas H. Proctor 


13,748. 




Serlina Richardson 


569. 




Joseph E. Warren 


243. 




Gertrude Wright 


2,817. 




Aaron George-Cemetery 


2,460. 


86,706 


In Custody of Board of Selectmen: 






Emma Gay-Varney Playground 




661 



In Custody of Veterans Emergency 
Fund Committee: 

Veterans Emergency Fund 



9,363. 



2,060,869 



EDUCATIONAL COLLABORATIVE BOARD FUND 

Section 4-E Chapter 40 General Laws 

Cash-In Custody of Treasurer 



717. 



Unexpended Balance 



717. 



FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING FUNDS 



Fiscal Year 1982-1983 



Balance July 1, 1982 

Plus Receipts: 
Entitlements 
Interest Earned 



Less: Authorized Appropriations 
Fire Department- Wages 
Police Department-Wages 
Sidewalks-Acton Road 
Preliminary Project Studies 



Appropriations Forwarded To Fiscal 1984 
Sidewalks- Acton Road 
Preliminary Project Studies 

Balance June 30, 1983 





77,049.99 


474,258.00 




12,006.29 


486.264.29 




563,314.28 


250,000.00 




250,000.00 




40,015.38 




2,175.00 


542,190.38 




21,123.90 


40,015.38 




658.34 


40,673.72 




61,797.62 



CHANGES IN SURPLUS REVENUE 
Fiscal Year 1982-1983 

1982 



Balance July 1, 

Deductions: 

Audit Adjustments 
Tax Titles Taken 
Appropriations STM 11-8-82 

Additions: 

Omitted Assessments 
Excess Assessments 
Tax Titles Redeemed 



1,070.72 
204,410.07 
282,224.00 



2,397.00 

5,894.83 

154,582.56 



1,959,027.63 



487,704.79 
1,471,322.84 



64 



Unexpended Appropriations 
Excess Receipts 

Balance June 30, 1983 

Surplus Revenue-Restricted 
Surplus Revenue-Unrestricted 



120,379.28 
603,432.23 



886,685.90 
2.358.008.74 

799,593.00 
1.558.415.74 
2.358.008.74 



DEBT STATEMENT 



Bond Issue 

Junior High School 

Wcstland-Harrington Schools 

Byam School 

School Building Capital Improvements #3 

School Building Capital Improvement #2 

School Computer Purchase 

1972 High School #2 

TOTAL? 



Interest 


Outstanding 


Payments 


Outstanding 


Principal 


Interest 


Rate 


6-30-82 


1983 


6-30-83 


Due 1984 


Due 1984 


3.25 


205.000. 


105.000. 


100.000. 


100.000. 


3.250. 


4.30 


860.000. 


160.000. 


700.000. 


160.000. 


30.100. 


6.00 


815.000. 


105.000. 


710.000. 


105.000. 


39.450. 


8.425 


00. 


00. 


473,061. 


473.061. 


40.167. 


9.25 


200.000. 


200.000. 


00. 


00. 


00. 


9.50 


168.000. 


168.000. 


00. 


00. 


00. 


4.40 


850.000. 


850.000. 


00. 


00. 


00. 




3.098.000. 


1.588.000. 


1.983.061. 


838.061. 


112.067. 



DISBURSEMENTS 



General Govermment: 
Moderator 
Selectmen 
Accounting 
Treasurer/Collector 
Assessors 
Town Clerk 
Public Buildings 
Law 

Elections 
Registrars 
Finance Committee 
Planning Board 
Board of Appeals 
Personnel Board 
Conservation Commission 
Historical Commission 
Historic District Commission 
Constable 
Council On Aging 
Town Celebration Committer 
Town Aide 

Total General Government 

Public Safety: 

Police Department: 
Salaries 

Expense and Outlay 
Purchase Cruisers 
Mutual Aid 
Purchase Radios 

Total Police Department 

Fire Department: 
Salaries 
Expense and Outlay 

Total Fire Department 

Misc. Protection: 
Hydrant Service 
Tree Warden 
Insect Pest Control 
Inspection 
Dog Officer 
Animal Inspector 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Civilian Defense 

Total Misc. Protection 



1982 

300. 
80.916. 
62.754. 
134.474. 
87.571. 
62.072. 
67.258. 
36.626. 
10.596. 
24.514. 

991. 

10.406. 

3.921. 

343. 
14.563. 

892. 

803. 

15. 

41.718 

00. 

17.237. 



657.970. 



1.286.212 

199.622 

71.875. 

1.285. 

00. 

1.558.994. 



1.601.252. 

HI 11(11, 

1.685.258. 



1983 

300. 

90.962. 

64.835. 

129.209. 

93.355. 

66.431. 

80.660. 

33.960. 

24.125. 

27.923. 

1.087. 

12.843. 

4.336. 

355. 
11.854. 

786. 

913. 

127 
38.896. 

427. 
18.766. 



702.150. 



1.468.352. 

192.946. 

26.685. 

1.205. 

17.000. 

1.706.188. 



1.723.910. 
92.275. 

1.816.185. 



74.726. 


74.726 


14.755. 


9.836 


11.856 


12.113 


103.555. 


112.825 


22.285. 


19.604 


1.200. 


1.200 


2.000 


2.126 


3.221. 


10.860 



233.598. 



243.290. 



Public Health: 

Salaries & Expense 

Sewer Commission: 
Expenses 
Professional Fees 
Facilities Plan (Grant) 

Total Sewer Commission 

Highway Department: 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Waste Collection 
Snow and I, e 
Sidewalks 

Purchase of Equipment 
Drainage Construction 
Rrsurl.li r Streets 
Chapter 90 Construction 

Total Highway Department 

Street Lighting: 

Veterans Benefits: 
Salaries & Expenses 
Cash and Material Grants 

Total Veterans Benefits 

Libraries 

Wages & Salaries 

Expense 

Books and Periodicals 

Outlay 

Carriage House Renovations 

Gifts From Individuals 

Automation of Records 

Total Libraries 

Parks and Recreation: 
Parks 

Varney Playground 
Recreation Commission 
Edwards Memorial Beach 

Total Parks and Recreation 

Insurance: 

Property Liability & All Types 
Chapter 32B 

Total Insurance 



71.587. 



79.776. 





2.765. 


922. 


39.537. 


11.051. 


19.299. 


121.580. 


61.601. 


133.553. 


341.267. 


425.825. 


242.411. 


233.305. 


118.000. 


147.676. 


359.548. 


268.969. 


28.430. 


9.848. 


00. 


20.180. 


83.577. 


34.913. 


99.500 


278.348. 


109. 


233.365. 


1.572.842. 


1.952.429. 


116.719. 


116.749. 


32.101 


35.554. 


53.403. 


58.493. 


85.804. 


94.047. 


202.835. 


240.716. 


11.194. 


39.484. 


66.661. 


66.800. 


00 


3.300. 


1.398. 


1.547. 


2.017. 


998. 


00. 


60.047. 


314.105. 


412.892. 


30.040. 


31.952. 


4.022. 


4.067. 


19,825. 


24.557. 


986. 


890. 


54.873. 


61.466. 


250,324. 


285.916. 


407.526. 


505.181. 


657.850. 


791.097. 



65 



Schools: 

School Committee 

Superintendents Office 

Supervision 

Principals 

Teachers 

Textbooks 

Library 

Audio-Visual 

Guidance 

Attendance 

Health Services 

Transportation 

Food Services 

Athletics 

Student Activities 

Custodial 

Utilities 

Maint. of Grounds 

Maint. of Buildings 

Maint. of Equipment 

Programs w/o Schools 

Chapter 766 

Total School Department 

School Revolving Funds: 
Cafeteria 
Athletics 
Adult Education 
Civic Activities 
Loss of Books 
Grant Accounts 

Total Revolving Funds 

Regional Vocational School 

School Renovations 
School Computer Purchase 



Cemeteries 
Salaries 

Repairs-Expense-Outlay 
Improv. and Devel. Fund 
Beautification P/C Transfer 
Sprinkler Repair-Trust Transfer 

Total Cemeteries 

Unclassified: 
Memorial Day 
Town Clock 

Town & Fin. Com. Reports 
Regional Drug Program 
Mental Health Program 
Elder Services of Merr. Valley 
NMAC Assessment 
Unemployment Benefits 
Cultural Council 
CATV Committee 
Renovate McFarlin Building 
Court Judgement 
Vinal Sq. Rehab Project (HUD) 
Bills of Prior Years 
Medical Expense Ret. Police & Fire 
Old Town Hall — Study and Design 
Mass. Energy Resources Grant 
Old Town Hall Renovations 
Disposal Live Animals 
Central-Vinal Sqs. Traffic Plans 

Total Unclassified 

Agency, Trust & Investments 

Fees & Licenses Due State & County 
Payroll Deductions 
Retirement — Pension Expense 
State and County Assessments 
Cemetery P/C Bequests 



94.879. 

324,650. 

190,111. 

646,339. 

7,888,327. 

91,868. 
214,918. 

96.144. 
389,557. 

25,900. 
105,085. 
629,364. 

34,252. 
106,755. 

33,328. 
766,267. 
771,204. 

31,374. 

43,475. 

175,345. 

6,979. 

1,444,386. 

14,110,507. 



573,073. 

31,333. 

13,747. 

26.414. 

256. 

299.916. 

944,439. 

585.591. 

272,230. 
150,842. 

423,072. 



132,553. 



693. 

252. 

5,088. 

23,737. 

8,695. 

1,800. 

8,592. 

285,738. 

40. 

41. 

690,395. 

6,366. 

198,232. 

2,667. 

416. 

2,600. 

37.508. 

00. 

00. 

00. 

1.272,860. 



97,435. 

361,940. 

183,766. 

666,285. 

8,344,912. 

90.921. 
224,925. 
127,351. 
425,278. 

27,104. 
115.560. 
719,544. 

38,099. 
120,323. 

39,358. 
813.999. 
787,178. 

39.402. 

49.365. 

207,743. 

7,389. 

1.665.701. 

15.153,578. 



632.498. 

42,799. 

14,622. 

21,968. 

00. 

279.636. 

991,523. 

546,649. 

335,880. 
14,865. 

350.745. 



95,528. 


106.832 


20.100. 


19,102 


12,856. 


6,588 


3,842. 


10,976 


227. 


1,179 



144,677. 



751. 

484. 

4,942. 

00. 

8,695. 

1,800. 

8,016. 

72.435. 

1,081. 

1.282. 

72,692. 

174. 

28,919. 

3,343. 

639. 

5,969. 

2,665. 

100.000. 

800. 

57,500. 



372,187. 



Tax Levy Refunds 


60,707 


53,486. 


Performance Bonds 


3.000. 


00. 


Misc. Trust Funds 


10,641. 


27,828. 


Water District Liens 


10,233. 


8,106. 


Police Outside Details 


134.161. 


201,394. 


Merrimack Education Center 


125,126. 


92,472. 


Tailings 


1.658. 


996. 


Fire Ins. Proceeds — North School 


1,526,883. 


00. 


Total Agency. Trust & Investment 


9,549,150. 


8.010.604. 


Interest — Loans: 






Anticipation Loans 


42,726. 


148,498. 


Bonded Debt 


199,301. 


142,605. 


Total Interest 


242,027. 


291.103. 


Principal — Loans: 






Anticipation of Revenue 


5,000,000. 


14,500,000. 


Bonded Debt 


1.816.000. 


1.588,000. 


Total Principal 


6,816.000. 


16,088,000. 


Warrants Previous Years 


413,006. 


1.115,096. 


Total Disbursements 


41,560,406. 


51.173,984. 


Cash Balance On Hand June 30 


4,263,973. 


10,013,338. 


Total 


45,824,379. 


61,187,322. 


RECEIPTS 






General Revenue: 


1982 


1983 


Taxes: 






Personal Property 


695,422. 


491,917. 


Real Estate 


15,018,350. 


15,792,620. 


Farm Animal Excise 


584. 


980. 


Motor Vehicle Excise 


869,152. 


947,092. 


Tax Title Redemptions 


1,378. 


154,583. 


Lieu of Taxes-State Property 


3,416. 


3,405. 


Lieu of Taxes-Veterans Abatements 


9,921. 


8,677. 


Elderly Exemptions 


33,931. 


34.483. 


Total Taxes 


16,632,154. 


17.433,757. 


Fines and Permits: 






Court Fines 


151,802. 


181,382. 


Permits, Fees & Licenses 


138,173. 


203,872. 


Alcoholic 


25,100. 


24,550. 


Total Fines and Permits 


315,075. 


409,804. 



13,564. 


12.632 


5,976,074. 


6.254,569 


636,988. 


656.850 


1,030,735. 


679.859 


19,380. 


22.412 



Grants and Gifts: 
County: 
Dog Fund 

Total Grants From County 

Federal Government: 
Public Law 874 
Revenue Sharing 
Com. Dev. Program HUD 
EDA Energy Grant 
EPA Grant (Sewer Com.) 

Total Grants from Federal Gov't. 

State: 

Aid To Education 

School Building Assistance 

School Lunch Program 

Tuition, Trans, of State Wards 

School Transportation 

Aid To Public Libraries 

Highway-Chapter 81 

Highway & Transit Development 

Local Aid Fund 

Veterans Benefits 

Dept. of Elder Affairs 

School Grant Programs 

Dept. of Public Safety 

Residential School Costs 



4,589. 



2,937. 



4,589. 


2,937. 


36,151. 


12,190. 


517,042. 


474,258. 


29,000. 


30.000. 


408.800. 


63.200. 


63,500. 


94,700. 


1,054,493. 


674,348. 


3.924,236. 


3.954,518. 


874,315. 


973,555. 


110.081. 


127,993. 


122.817. 


118,719. 


492.794. 


380,139. 


15,587. 


15,587. 


146,983. 


145,762. 


148,672. 


169.071. 


1,630.903. 


1,645,784 


29.359. 


30.581 


18,511. 


6,786 


272,349. 


272,690 


1,000. 


00 


76,821. 


00. 



66 



Div. of Water Pollution Control 
Dept. of Energy Resources 
Dept. of Environmental Affairs 
Arts Lottery Council 
Chapter 90 Reimbursement 



Agency. Trust and Investment: 
Payroll Withholdings 
Cemetery P/C In teres) 
Cemetery Douglas Trust 
Licenses Due County 
Licenses Due Slate 
Conservation Fund 
Library Trust Funds 
Water District Liens 
Stabilization Fund 
Police Outside Detail 
Merrimack Education Center 



12,700. 


18,945. 


Tailings 


40,008. 


00. 


Performance Bonds 


00. 


150.000. 


Sinking Fund 


00. 


1.081. 


Other Trust Funds 


00. 


147,471. 





Total Grants From State 


7.917.136. 


8,158.682. 


Individuals: 






Library-Carriage House 


2.782. 


2.423. 


Library- Purchase of Books 


17. 


1.002. 


Cemetery Department 


250. 


00. 


Recreation Commission 


550. 


00. 


Total Gifts From Individuals 


3.599. 


3.425. 


Lowell Regional Transit Authority 


24.045. 


21.221. 


Departmental Receipts: 






Selectmen 


11.681. 


7.464. 


Treasurer/Collector 


7,875. 


19.920. 


Town Clerk 


2.512. 


4.936. 


Police 


18.653. 


20.542. 


Public Buildings 


11.615. 


13.800. 


Highway 


627. 


1.932. 


Dog Officer 


2.115. 


1.240. 


Veterans Benefits 


6.913. 


4.294. 


Misc. 


10.661. 


14,725 


Sale of Town Property 


70.800. 


14.000. 


Recreation-Revolving Fund 


1.056. 


982. 




144.508. 


103.835. 


School: 






Cafeteria Lunch Sales 


489.357. 


535.941. 


Tuition, Rents & Misc. 


52.199. 


78.480. 


Athletic Programs 


29.266. 


41.680. 


Educational Collaborative Fund 


8.300. 


15.500. 




579.122. 


671.601. 


Library: 






Fines 


5.740. 


5.916. 


Cemetery 






Sale of Lots & Graves 


10.000. 


11.755. 


Internments 


13.945. 


16.445. 


P C Care Bequests 


19.380. 


22.412. 




43.325. 


50.612. 


Total Departmental Receipt! 


772.695. 


831.964. 


Municipal Indebtedness: 






Anticipation of Revenue 


5.000.000. 


14.500.000. 


Note-School Rrno\alion 


Ji HI 000. 


473.061. 


Note-School Computer 


168.000. 


00. 


Total From Borrowings 


5.368.000. 


14.973.061. 


Interest Income: 






Taxes 


89.495. 


106.076. 


Deposits 


359.461. 


148.017. 


Federal Revenue Sharing 


36.200. 


12.006. 


Com Dev. ProgTam Hl'D 


4.822. 


00. 


Misc. 


213. 


93. 


Total Interest Income 


490.191. 


266.192. 


Unpaid Warrants Current Year 


1.115.096. 


7.059.992. 


Refunds 


39.333 


20.876. 



.886.006. 


6.352.041 


32.761. 


33.100 


1.729. 


00 


8.124. 


6.427 


9.020. 


2.080 


42.785. 


00 


8.472. 


9.249 


10.233. 


6.280 


00. 


335.678 


143.883. 


186.873 


120.000. 


90.000 



Total Agency. Trust & Investment 

Total Receipts 

Cash Balance On Hand July 1 

Total 



9,337. 
3.000. 

00. 

00. 

6,278.350. 


2.351. 
900. 

24,000. 
18.111. 

7,067,090. 


40.014.756. 
5.809.623. 

45.824.379. 


56,923,349. 
4,263,973. 

61,187.322. 



67 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 

Building Department 
Ronald W. Wetmore 
Inspector of Buildings 



Maps 
Copies 



121 
67 



182.- 
33.- 



Wire Inspector 

Francis E. Cunningham 

Plumbing Inspector 

William Shedd 



Local Inspector 

Bruce H. Clark 

Gas Inspector 

Neal Stanley 



Elevator Inspector Senior Clerk 

Joseph E. Morrissey Karen C. Flynn 

Principal Clerk 
Catherine R. Curran 

To the Honorable Board of 
Selectmen: 

This Office has experienced a tremendous growth dur- 
ing this calendar year. Permits were dramatically up in 
every department. A total of 3,676 permits were issued, a 
difference of 771 from last years totals. At this time last 
year I was confident that the department would become 
self sufficient. This has happened as we collected 
$171,485., with a budget of $118,000. The total valua- 
tion is estimated to be in excess of $40,000,000. in new 
building this past year. A lot of this growth is Industrial 
and Commercial; however, Single Family homes and Con- 
dominium development was very high and will continue 
that way for the next several years. I expect in excess of 
200 permits in the coming year to be Single Family and 
Condominiums. The amount of addition permits last 
year remains on a par with the year before and I feel this 
will always be a mainstay. 

My expectation for the coming year is more growth 
on a par with this year. I expect to collect about the same 
amount in fees or more. And I foresee this growth pattern 
not changing for five years or more. I feel that we have 
maintained a quality level of service to the Town and ex- 
pect that quality to continue. To that end I again thank 
my fellow Inspectors and also my Clerks for their support 
and loyalty to me this past year, and I look forward to 
working with them in the coming years. I also wish to 
thank all the Town Departments for their cooperation 
this past year. 

The following is a breakdown of the permits issued for 
the year: 



TOTAL 



3,676 $171,485.- 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ronald W. Wetmore 
Building Inspector 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 
Town of Chelmsford, Ma. 

Dear Board Members, 

Fiscal "83" was a "banner year" for thr Fire Depart- 
ment in regard to fire losses which were at a minimum as 
compared to other years. We feel this was due to our Fire 
Prevention Program, In-Service Inspections and Smoke 
Detectors. 

This year in keeping with our Capital Outlay Program, 
we are requesting a new 1000 GPM pumper to replace a 
1957 Maxim. We are also requesting repair on the roofs 
at the south and north fire stations and requesting funds 
to implement phase two in updating the fire alarm equip- 
ment. 

Many thanks to all town officials and employees for the 
excellent cooperation given to the fire department during 
the past year, and again congratulations and thanks to 
the men of the department for continuing to maintain 
the high standard of courage and ability that has been 
shown in the past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frederick H. Reid 
Fire Chief 



1983 

Number of Permits 

Building 

Wires 

Gas 

Plumbing 

Signs 

Cert, of Occup. 

Cert, of Insp. 

Yard Sales 

Elevator 





1983 




Total Fees 




Collected 


770 


$112,953.- 


820 


23,091.- 


698 


$ 10,097.- 


761 


$ 16,479.- 


76 


$ 2,124.- 


51 


$ 2,017.- 


66 


$ 2,470.- 


239 


$ 1,195.- 


7 


$ 844.- 



68 



PERSONNEL 



Fire Chief 
Frederick H. Reid 

Deputy Fire Chief 
James A. Sousa 



Thomas Curran 
James M. Spinney 



Arthur G. Anderson 
Bertrand E. Dixon, Jr 
Robert K. Adams 
Alvin F. Wetmore 
Jack D. Hadley 
Robert A. Bennett 
Robert R. Gagnon 
Harold J. Pierce, Jr. 
Donald A. Weber 
Paul D. Henderson 
Peter T. Wetherbee 
Francis J. Conlin 
Donald A. Drew 
James T. Cutter 
Gerald D. Tonics 
Richard P. ONeil 
Robert L. Hughes 
James P. Flaherty 
Joseph F. Lynch 
Paul D. Hayes 
Terrancc A. Goode 
William H. Hadley 
Leo A. Martin 
Emil P. Magiera 
Philip Dube 
John P DcPalma 
Walter F. Adley. Jr 
Dennis Vargelctis 
Richard L. Grcnon 
Bruce R. Donovan 

Dcpt. Asst. 
Mary Ann Koulas 



Captains 

Charles S. Galloway. Jr. 
Ronald J. Sawicki 
Charles Schramm 

Firefighter! 

Wallace V . Maybury, Jr. iRo 6 15 ss> 
(Rm. 7 16 83) William V. Cady, Jr. 
William F. Curran 
Daniel T. Reid 
Joseph J. Spinazola 
Michael McTeague 
Ernest J. Frobese 
James P. Curran 
Peter C. Johnson 
William M. Burke. Jr. 
Edward J. Nolet 
Michael F. Curran 
Michael D. Ridlon 
William H. Jamer 
Raymond R. Kydd 
James Bocrmcester 
William Dalton 
Thomas D. Miskell 
David Gelincau 
Brian J. Stanton 
Richard Miller 
Dennis Keohane 
John L. Carroll 
David C. Campbell 
William Campbell 
James F. Reid 
James J. Durkin iKr. ■> 10 
Francis Mark Conlin 
David P. Clancy 
John D. Ubele 

Mechanic 
George Fetzer 



FIRE DEPARTMENT RESPONSES FOR 1983 



Month 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Total 



* of 


Buildings 


Auto 


Outdoor 


Mutual 


Medical 


Service 


Investi- 


False 


Alarms 








Aid 






gat 


ion 




91 


10 


5 


6 


1 


17 


15 




20 


17 


78 


10 


7 


1 





23 


5 




20 


12 


79 


7 


4 


8 





19 


7 




24 


10 


96 


5 


2 


15 


2 


30 


15 




22 


5 


81 


3 


6 


4 





30 


10 




24 


1 


125 


5 


8 


14 


4 


35 


14 




38 


7 


114 


5 


7 


20 


1 


23 


15 




37 


6 


116 


7 


4 


22 


1 


16 


16 




48 


2 


96 


2 


9 


11 


1 


34 


12 




22 


5 


104 


8 


11 


12 


1 


22 


9 




34 


7 


103 


4 


6 


10 


2 


26 


15 




36 


4 


108 


7 


7 


7 


1 


32 


13 




36 


5 



1191 



73 



76 



130 



14 



307 



146 



364 



81 



69 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, MA 

Dear Board Members: 

I hereby submit my report of the Highway Department 
for the year ending December 31, 1983. 

I wish to express my appreciation to all town officials 
for the fine co-operation given to me and to the members 
of the Highway Department. 

I also would like to thank all of the residents who called 
and wrote to me expressing their gratitude. 

Last, but not least, I take this opportunity to say to my 
men "thanks for a job well done". 

The Department, in general, is a smooth operating 
facility. The work schedule grows larger each year and 
projects completed each year are more numerous than 
ever before. Every step is now taken in the right direction. 

Once again, I commend the personnel of the Highway 
Department for continuing to maintain a high standard. 

The equipment should be updated on a yearly basis. 
Something new each year is the way I would like to see the 
updating process progress. Some of the equipment is in 
poor, poor condition. 

The maintenance of all streets was carried out in the 
usual manner. This includes the street sweeping, basin 
cleaning, cleaning of culverts and brooks, repairing 
washouts and graveling roads. The patching of pot holes, 
erection of signs, painting of traffic lines and cross walks. 
Keeping guard rails in repair and signal lights, the plow- 
ing, salting, sand and snow removal. 

All other types of general maintenance was performed. 

Chapter 90 Funds 

Graniteville Road was rebuilt from Richardson Rd. to 
Old Westford Rd. - 2190' 

Parkhurst Road was rebuilt from North Road to the 
Route 3 overpass. -2200' 

Streets overlayed with Bituminous Concrete: 

Dalton Road (from Cortez Street to Chelmsford 

Street) 1511.27 Ton 

Steadman Street (from Chelmsford Street to 

1 00' beyond Dalton Rd . ) 661.86 Ton 

Boston Road (from Russell Mill Pond to 

Harvey Road) 1527.71 Ton 

Chelmsford Street ( at the railroad tracks) 1 34 . 1 Ton 

Total tons 3834.85 Ton 



Streets resurfaced with a stone, sand, and asphalt mix: 



Bridge St. 
(Portion) 
Pine Street 
Putnam Ave. 

Marinel Ave. 
(Depression) 
Empire Street 

Queen Street 

Hugo Lane 
Bentley Lane 
Gifford Lane 
Abbott Lane 
(Portion) 
Bishop Street 
Sands Place 
Freeman Road 

Road between 
Town Hall & 
Center School 



Lord Road 

Parker Road 
Glenn Ave. 
(Portion) 
Hildreth Street 

State Street 

Noble Drive 

Ledge Road 
Albina Street 
Beaulieu Street 
Oak Knoll Road 



Perham Street 

Fay Street 
Mill Road 
(Portion) 
Village View.Rd. 
(Portion 
Maple Road 
(over R.R. Tracks) 
Old Stage Rd. 
(Off Parker Rd.) 
Plum Street 
Oak Street 
Russell Road 
Rogers Road 



New Spaulding St. Larkin Ave. 
New Fletcher St. James Street 
Grove Street Town Hall Parking 

Lot 
Cemetery Lane 



Streets sealed with liquid asphalt: 



Waverly Avenue 
Rutledge Ave. 
Housatonic Ave. 
Bowl Road 
Lancaster Ave. 
St. Nicholas Ave. 
Clinton Avenue 
Fuller Road 
Delwood Road 
Hilltop Terrace 
Sylvan Avenue 
Sunset Avenue 
Oriole Street 
Arlington Street 
Ledge Road 



Navillus Street 
Francis Street 
Woodbine Street 
Woodbine St. Ext. 
Westland Avenue 
Juniper Street 
Wildwood Street 
Fern Street 
Cypress Street 
Subway Ave. 
Subway Ave. Ext. 
Seneca Avenue 
Maple Street 
Morgan Drive 



Manahan Street 
Glenn Avenue 

B. Street 

C. Street 
Sandra Drive 
Elm Street 
Proctor Road 
Hugo Lane 
Mill Road 
Pine Street 
Bridge Street 
Crosby Lane 
Grandview Road 
Berkeley Drive 



Drainage projects completed in 1983 are as follows: 



Graniteville Rd. 
(at High School 
Driveway) 

Dunstable Rd. 
(#250, #251) 



Freeman Rd. 



— 235 feet— 10" aluminum pipe, 
two catch basins, one manhole, 
three tree stumps removed. 

— 160 feet— 12" aluminum pipe, 
40 feet— 12" asphalt coated pipe, 
30 feet— 10" aluminum pipe, two 
catch basins, one manhole. Trees 
cut down, landscaped, loamed and 
seeded. 

— 120 feet— 15" aluminum pipe. 



Perham & Plum —150 feet — 12" coated pipe, two 
Streets catch basins. 

Thomas Dr. (#21) —204 feet — 8" perforated pipe, two 
catch basins. 



70 



Thomas Dr. (#41) —Two catch basins installed. 

Garrison Rd. —340 feet — 12" aluminum pipe, 

two catch basins. 

Hunt Rd. —340 feet— 12" steel coated pipe, 

two catch basins, one manhole. 



Highway Department Personnel is as follows: 

Supt. of Streets 
Harold E. Gray 

Foremen 

Arthur G. Deschaine Frederick W. Greenwood 



Brick Kiln Rd. —Clean entrance and exit of 

culvert. 



Supervisor 

Pearl Koulas 



Scotty Hollow —Relocated 500 feet to Sportsmens 

Brook Club Pond. 



Grader Operator 

Arthur L. Newcomb 



Old Westford Rd. —Install catch basin. 

(#128) 

Clarissa Rd. —20 feet— 10" pipe, one manhole. 

Ripley St. —One catch basin. 

North Rd. (#190) -Rebuild catch basin. Pipe to 
basin. 

Purcell & Meehan - 100 feet 12" aluminum pipe. 80 
Drive feet 12" steel coated pipe, four 

catch basins installed. 

Bailey Terrace —410 feet 12" aluminum pipe, two 

catch basins, one manhole installed. 
Rebuild existing catch basin. 

Blodgett Park —250 feet — 8" steel pipe, one man- 

hole. 

Lillian Ave. —115 feel— 15" steel pipe, one 

manhole. 



Mechanics — Heavy Equipment 

Bobby Loyd John C. Ferreira, Jr. 

Engineering Equipment Operators 
Roy J. Costa Walter J. McLaughlin, Jr. 

David G. Harvey Richard J. Soucier 

Truck Drivers, Laborers 
Gary E. Beaulieu LawrenceJ. Ferreira 

Lee Carkin DennisJ. Greenwood 

JohnJ. Cronin Ernest A. Howland 

James T. Crotty Joseph C. Oczkowski 

FrederickJ. Dillon Anthony L. Sousa 

Laborers 

Kenneth R. Burroughs Leslie L. Dukeshire, Jr. 

Stephen K. Harvey 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harold Gray 
Supt. of Streets 



Elm St. - 65 feet — 18" concrete pipe. 

North Road (#34) -One catch basin installed. 

Curbing and Sidewalk Construction 

Central Square Curbing reset. Bituminous concrete 
surface. - 300 feet 

North Road 120 feet curbing installed. Bitu- 

minous concrete surface. 

Littleton Road 295 feet curbing installed. Bitu- 

minous concrete surface. 

Dallon Road 198 feet curbing installed. Bitu- 

minous concrete surface. 

Gay Street 150 feet curbing installed. Bitu- 

minous concrete surface. 

Middlesex Street 150 feet curbing installed. 200 feet 
bituminous concrete surface. 



Dalton Rd. @ New traffic island and curb in- 

Chelmsford St. stalled. 



71 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Board of Selectmen 

Town Hall 

Billerica Road 

Chelmsford, Massachusetts 01824 

Dear Board Members: 

I herein respectfully submit for your information and 
review, the Annual Report of the Police Department for 
the year 1983. 

At the present time the department is made up of 49 
permanent men. 

Chief of Police 

Raymond P. McKeon 

Deputy Chief of Administration 
James C. Greska 

Deputy Chief of Operations 

Pennryn D. Fitts 

Captains 

ArmandJ. Caron Walter W. Edwards, Jr. 

Phillip N. Molleur 

Sergeants 
Leslie H. Adams William R. McAllister 

Steven A. Burns Raymond G. McCusker 

Lance R. Cunningham Francis X. Roark 

John O. Walsh 



Richard A. Adams 
Edgar L. Auger 
Mark L. Burlamachi, 
Robert M. Burns 
Paul E. Cooper 
Patrick W. Daley 
Bruce A. Darwin 
John J. Donovan 
Kenneth R. Duane 
Jared S. Finnegan 
James T. Finnegan 
William J. Floyd, III 
Joseph R. Gamache 
Francis P. Kelly 
James J. Kerrigan 
Roland E. Linstad 
Russell H. Linstad 
Henry R. McEnany 



Jr 



Nora F. Clifford 
Barbara W. Gibb 
Mary Long 

Nora F. Clifford 
Paula Rogers 



Patrolmen 

John M. McGeown, Jr. 
Peter C. McGeown 
James F. Midgley 
Brian F. Mullen 
James F. Murphy 
Thomas A. Niemaszyk 
Timothy F. OGonnor 
John E. Redican 
Chandler J. Robinson 
Edward M. Rooney 
E. Michael Rooney 
Michael W. Stott 
William S. Strobel 
Robert J. Trudel 
Daniel J. Walsh 
Eugene W. Walsh 
William R. Walsh 
Ernest R. Woessner, Jr. 

Matrons 

Barbara Power 
Linda H. Reid 
Paula Rogers 



Senior Clerks 

Paula B. Gervais 



Junior Clerk 
Linda H. Reid 

Custodian 

John P. Curran 

RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO THE 

1982 

. 2,253.00 

1,866.00 

21.50 

426.00 

. 193,033.00 

808.00 



Photocopying Machine 

Firearm Permits 

Bicycle Registrations 

Firearm Identification Cards . 

Court Fines 

Photographs 

Police Detail Account 

Service Charge 

Miscellaneous 

Parking Fines 

Restitution 

Total Receipts returned to the 

Town 



6,390.00 
1,385.10 
9,142.00 



TOWN 

1982 

2,577.00 

2,960.00 

15.50 

404.00 

181,382.00 

852.00 

7,732.54 

4,238.00 

10,225.00 

10,554.00 

220,940.04 



ARRESTS 

Crimes Against Persons 100 

Crimes Against Property 248 

Crimes Against Public Order 128 

DISPOSITION OF CASES IN 1983 

Fined 108 

Placed on Probation 31 

Suspended Sentence and Placed on Probation 18 

Placed on File 18 

Not Guilty Finding 7 

Dismissed with Probable Cause 16 

Ordered to Pay Court Costs and Continued 

Without a Finding 82 

Committed to Youth Service Board 8 

Committed to M.C.I. Walpole 1 

Committed to M.C.I. Concord 

Committed to M.C.I. Billerica 39 

Turned over to other out-of-town Police Depts. 

& Courts 67 

Cases Pending and Continued in the Courts 134 

Placed on Alcohol Safety Program 70 

MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 

Calls Answered by Cruisers 

Summons Served 

Licenses Suspended 

Accidents Reported 

Personal Injuries Reported .... 

Fatal Accidents 

Mileage of Cruisers 342,470 

Special Property Checks (Aux. 

Police) 

Station Lockups 

Citations Issued 

Parking Violations 

Doors and Windows Found Open . 
Detoxification Unit 



1982 


1983 


2,090 


11,667 


674 


461 


85 


143 


1,674 


1,606 


292 


206 


1 


2 


2,470 


349,795 


8,256 


7,100 


622 


561 


3,206 


3,819 


1,262 


1,105 


109 


50 


176 


197 



72 



Captain Walter W. Edwards, Jr. retired from the 
Police Department after 30 years of service. Sgt. John J. 
Mack, Jr. who has been with this department for 10 years 
was promoted to the position of Captain. Officer Lance 
R. Cunningham, with the department for 8 years was 
promoted to the rank of Sergeant and assigned to Lowell 
District Court as Court Prosecutor for the Chelmsford 
Police Department. Officer John J. Bell with our depart- 
ment for 25 years, and Officer Ronald A. Leach with our 
department for 23 years, retired. Four men graduated 
from Mass. State Police Academy Basic Recruit Course 
and were appointed as permanent patrolmen. They were, 
Peter C. McGeown, James F. Murphy. Brian F. Mullen 
and Paul E. Cooper. Susan M. Parkhurst resigned her 
position as Senior Clerk in the Police Department. 

A new Micro Computer was purchased, and is com- 
patible to the main computer at the School Department. 
This new concept will serve to facilitate our payroll, bill- 
ing and personnel records in a more efficient and ex- 
peditious manner in the best interest of the Town. 

The Chelmsford Police Department with 16 other sur- 
rounding cities and towns this past year, formed the Nor- 
theast Police Regional Institute located on the grounds of 
the Tewksbury State Hospital. This new school will be us- 
ed as an in-service training program at a minimal cost to 
the Town. Every Police Officer in our Department will 
attend this school for 1 week each year, to be upgraded in 
Criminal Law, Court Procedures, Officer Survival. 
Evidence, Use of Force, Civil Liability, Crisis Interven- 
tion, Stress and Sensitivity training. This new concept in 
training is the first effort by a Municipal Department in 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

In a continuing effort to upgrade the quality of Police 
Service to the Town of Chelmsford, many officers attend 
ed specialized training schools run by the Mass. Criminal 
Justice Training Council, to increase their expertise in the 
Law Enforcement Field 

SCHOOLS & SEMINARS ATTENDED 1983 

Basic Photography 2 men 

Officer's Command Training School 5 men 

Child Abuse Seminar 3 men 

Crime Search School 3 men 

First Responder Course 1 man 

Interview & Interrogation School 1 man 

Chins Seminar 2 men 

Cars Seminar 2 men 

Rape Investigation Seminar 1 man 

Advanced Fingerprint School 1 man 

Identi-Kit School 3 men 

Hostage Management Seminar 1 man 

Police Liability Program 2 men 

Alarm Theory & Application 1 man 

Fraudulent Check Seminar 4 men 

Basic Fingerprint School 2 men 

Criminal Investigator's School 5 men 

Advanced Motor Cycle Operation & 

Enforcement School 1 man 

Shot Gun - Second Weapon School 1 man 

Officer Survival School 2 men 



Forgery Seminar 2 men 

Teenage Alcohol & Drug Abuse Seminar 2 men 

OUI Enforcement Seminar 2 men 

Courtroom Testimony Seminar 2 men 

Arrest Search & Seizure School 3 men 

Liability for Police Actions Seminar 1 man 

Suicide Seminar 1 man 

Training Officer's Training Seminar 1 man 

Civil Liability Seminar 3 men 

Officer's Training Seminar 2 men 

Recruit Selection Seminar 1 man 

Firearms Update 1 man 

Auto Reduction Seminar 4 men 

►Drug Investigaror Course 1 man 

Domestic Violence Seminar 1 man 

Credit Card Seminar 2 men 

Drug Abuse Seminar 1 man 

Criminal Law Seminar 1 man 

Fraudulent Check Association Seminar 2 men 

Anti-Crime Seminar 2 men 

Print Index School 2 men 

Drug Raid Seminar 1 man 

At the present time 21 members of the Police Depart- 
ment have received College Degrees to date, and 17 addi- 
tional officers are presently enrolled in Degree Colleges 
and Universities. 

Education will continue to be a prime goal in our 
department during 1984. 

This year, as in the past several years, the Town was 
able to save several thousand dollars by purchasing four 
new police cruisers through the Greater Boston Police 
Council. 

I would like to express my sincerest appreciation to the 
Board of Selectmen and all town officials, departments, 
and committees for the excellent cooperation given to the 
Police Department and also congratulate all police and 
civilian personnel of this department for once again, 
maintaining their high performance standards. 

Sincerely, 

Raymond P. McKeon 
Chief of Police 



AUXILIARY POLICE 

During 1983 the Auxiliary Police Unit participated in 
several events. Elks Road Race, Lowell Regatta Race, 
Boston Marathon. local road races, parades, Halloween, 
security for schools, JayCees Spook House, Middlesex 
County Kennel Club Dog Show, Chelmsford High School 
Graduation Exercises, July 4th festivities, as well as 
assisting the regular force at numerous motor vehicle ac- 
cidents. They also assisted with crowd and traffic control 
at the Central Congregational Church fire. 

The Auxiliary currently has six new officers attending 
the Mass. Criminal Justice Training Council Reserve Of- 
ficers Training Academy. The course meets 3 hours a 



73 



week for 14 weeks and covers Criminal and Motor Vehicle 
Law, traffic control, report writing, and police pro- 
cedure. Also all officers must be certified in C.P.R., Car- 
dio Pulmonary Resuscitation, First Aid and Firearms. 
The on service training is also continuing monthly at the 
Auxiliary building and all members have been recertified 
inC.P.R. 

Operation House Check was again a success. It 
operated 120 nights with the unit checking over 4,000 va- 
cant homes. In addition to homes, the unit checks all 
schools and town property for security. The Auxiliary 
cruiser covered over 16,000 miles during its assigned 
duties. The men donated 3,300 man hours to the town 
during the year. 

The Auxiliary is pleased to sponsor the Boy Scout Law 
Enforcement Post 370. The post members are young men 
and women between the ages of 14 and 21 who are in- 
terested in learning about a Law Enforcement career. 
The post meets and conducts its training at the Auxiliary 
building. The Scouts have assisted the Auxiliary Officers 
at many events. 

Our thanks to the officers and men of the Police 
Department for their support and assistance. 

ROSTER 
Director: 

Sergeant Raymond McCusker 
Chelmsford Police Department 

Co-Ordinator: 

Basil Larkin, Sergeant (Retired) 
Chelmsford Police Department 



Daniel Ahem 
Elizabeth Berger 
Kenneth Berger 
Richard Carkin 
Neal Casales 
Carol Dearborn 
Larry Dillon 
Paul Ericksen 
Eric Gordon 
Alan Grekula 
John Hardy 
Ellen Klimm 
Robert Klimm 



Dale Maybury 
Frederick Meehan 
Edward Nelson 
Edward Norton 
David Perry 
Bradford Poole 
Joyce Poole 
James Quinn 
Dave Ramsay 
Ralph Roscoe 
Susyn Stecchi 
Paul Villare 



ANIMAL INSPECTORS REPORT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

Gentlemen: 

The following is the animal inspection report for the 
year 1983. 



Number of dog bites 
Number of cattle 
Number of horses 
Number of swine 
Number of goats 



29 
146 

61 

105 

2 

Respectfully submitted, 

Martin A. Gruber, DVM 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



Members 

Daniel Burke, Chairman 
Thomas Welch, Vice Chairman 

Harold Organ, Jr. 




Gustav Fallgren 
Robert Kydd 


Dennis Valdinocci 


Alternates 

Eileen Duffy 

Clerk 

Marjorie Hennessy 




Robert Scharn 


Hearing Statistics: 

Total Granted Denied Withdrawn 


Variances 62 


45 


12 


5 


Spec. Permits 26 
Total 88 


24 
69 


1 
13 


1 

6 



In 1983 the majority of hearings have continued to be 
commercial/industrial property, home occupations, ad- 
ditions and zoning violations found when lending institu- 
tions require conformance to the zoning bylaw prior to is- 
suing mortgages. 

On behalf of the Board, I would like to take this oppor- 
tunity to thank all Town Boards and Officials for their 
cooperation during 1983. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Daniel W. Burke 

Chairman 



74 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



CHELMSFORD COUNCIL ON AGING 







Term 


Members 


Responsibilices 


Exp. 


James McBride 


Chairman 


1986 


John Droescher 


Land Acquisition 


1984 


Charles Galloway 


Clerk & Reservation Mgt. 


1985 


Judith Hass 


Land Acquisition 


1984 


Brian Leonard 


Wetlands & Land Acquisi- 






tion 


1986 


Henry McEnany 


Reservation Mgt. 


1985 


John Scott 


Treasurer & 






Land Acquisition 


1985 


Marjorie Hennessy Secretary 





The Conservation Commission continues to keep as its 
primary goal the preservation of the natural and 
desirable aspects of the Town of Chelmsford. 

The duties associated with the local administration of 
the Wetlands Protection Act easily absorb most of the 
time and effort of the Commission members. A total of 
nineteen hearings were held this year in accordance with 
Chapter 131, Section 40 of the Massachusetts General 
Laws. After careful review of each proposed plan, the 
Commission issued seventeen Orders of Conditions. Two 
proposals were denied by the Commission and subse- 
quently appealed. 

Community involvement in advising the Commission 
when wetlands transgressions begin to happen has been a 
tremendous help in assisting the Commission with the 
protection of the Town's wetland areas. 

Cooperation between Town Boards has enabled the 
Commission to inform a developer at the beginning stages 
of the development that a filing with the Commission will 
be necessary. This helps to avoid costly and unnecessary 
expenses on the part of the Town and the developer. 

Land Acquisition 

The Conservation Commission has made no new land 
acquisitions this year but is in the process of pursuing 
some in the future. 

Reservation Management 

The Commission continues to not only maintain the 
local reservations but is constantly trying to find ways to 
upgrade these natural areas. The Commission at the pre- 
sent time is studying a proposal from a professional 
forester to up-grade the reservation at Mill Road Forest. 
An extensive brush clearing was done at Crooked Spring 
and Wright Reservations. 



The Council on Aging continued during 1983 to strive 
to improve the quality of life for Chelmsford's older 
residents targeting efforts toward the most frail. The 
Louise Bishop Senior Center has directly provided many 
services and has served as an important link in the ex- 
isting network of agencies which assist the elderly. The 
Council has aimed to centralize information and referral 
services as well as maximizing access to appropriate com- 
munity resources through coordination and outreach. 

The following information is offered to highlight ac- 
tivities available in 1983: 

Transportation for the elderly was provided by the 
Roadrunner and the COA Van Service. The COA Van 
Service made 5821 passenger trips in 1983 and because it 
is under direct control has proven more flexible and less 
costly to the Town. Boston medical transportation was of- 
fered by the Roadrunner. 

Nutritious meals were delivered to the homebound and 
provided at the McCarthy Junior High School through 
the efforts of the Chelmsford School Food Services and 
many dedicated volunteers. A total of more than 23,000 
meals were served during the year, including for the first 
time home delivered meals during the summer. It should 
be noted that time limitations at the school do not allow 
for extended socialization and maybe this situation could 
be addressed in the future. 

The Council successfully sponsored a respite care pro- 
gram utilizing Department of Elder Affairs formula grant 
monies and private funds. This program provides relief to 
the family from the daily care of an older member. It is a 
service that is extremely important if families are to con- 
tinue to care for aging relatives. More than forty families 
used services throughout the year. 

Other activities were offered at the Senior Center dur- 
ing 1983 including monthly health education workshops, 
podiatry clinics, hearing and dental screening, fuel 
assistance, crafts and recreational programs. The size of 
the facility does limit its use as evidenced by the reloca- 
tion of the exercise-dance class to the Town Office Gym. 

Other residents once again participated in the Silver 
Haired Legislature Elections and the distribution of 
surplus cheese and butter. Older persons also volunteered 
numerous hours of service to the community in areas such 
as producing the Cable T.V. 'Young at Heart' program, 
knitting hats and mittens for needy children, delivering 
meals to homebound and providing companionship to 
lonely elders. 

Through programs sponsored by the Area Agency on 
Aging, Elder Services of the Merrimack Valley, Inc. 
many elderly residents received the necessary services in 
order to remain independent including case manage- 
ment, homemaker, chore, guardianship, and protective 
services. A "waiting list' for services was established for 
the first time in 1983 but was resolved with the passage of 



75 



a supplemental budget. Elder Services also funded legal 
and elderly health maintenance programs which Chelms- 
ford's older residents participated in along with income 
tax assistance and telephone reassurance. Kathleen 
Robinson served throughout the year as Chelmsford 
Representative to the Board of Directors. 

Chelmsford once again benefited from the excellent 
work of four Senior Aides assigned to the Council - Mary 
Barron, Lois Manty, Gerrie Mcintosh and Helen 
Palmgren. The Senior Aides primary function is outreach 
among the frail elderly; that is, to identify needs, provide 
individual advocacy in working with service agencies and 
establish a personal relationship with clients. In addition 
to the more than 3000 contacts made during 1983, the 
Senior Aides played an important role in the operation of 
the nutrition program and senior center. 

The Council also launched a Town-wide survey of the 
60* population in 1983. This assessment of more than 
3600 residents should be completed by the summer of 
1984 and will provide valuable information for future 
program planning. 

The year was also marked by the death of Council 
members Arthur Cooke and Chad Ward and Senior Aide 
Mary Barron who had served the community for many 
years with enthusiasm and dedication. 

Long-time Council on Aging members Sara Dunigan 
and William Marson resigned because of health problems 
and were designated as honorary members. During the 
year, the Board of Selectmen appointed Paul Bartel, 
Allen Bennett, Esther Christensen, John Cry an, Halvar 
Peterson and Barbara Renison to fill several vacancies on 
the Council. 

The Council extends sincere appreciation to the many 
community groups and churches which have organized 
special activities during the year and also to the many 
volunteers, young and old, who have devoted their time 
toward helping the elderly of Chelmsford. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Christina Ahern, Treasurer 

Paul Bartel 

Allen Bennett 

Esther Christensen 

John Cryan 

Paul Dube, Vice Chairman 

Lillian Gould 

Kathleen McDonald, Secretary 

Howard Moore, Chairman 

Halvar Peterson 

Barbara Renison 

Sara Dunigan (Honorary Member) 

Mary McAuliffe (Honorary Member) 

William Marson (Honorary Member) 



CULTURAL COUNCIL 



Members of the Council 



Marion Gould 
Chairperson 

Patricia Fitzpatrick 
Secretary 

Alice Gossett 
Member 



Bonnie Wilder 
Vice Chairperson 

Katherine Sullivan 
Treasurer 

Flavia Cigliano 
Member 



The 1983 Cultural Council is a newly formed Council 
of nine members. We lost four members in the first year. 
Edward Mazur Jr., a very active Chairman, moved to an- 
other town. Madeline Ellis became Chairperson but re- 
signed due to illness in her family. Elizabeth Weber 
found her business was taking all her time. Julie Gagnon 
has asked for a leave for a year or so for personal reasons. 
All were assets to the Council and are sorely missed. Two 
new members, Patricia Fitzpatrick and Flavia Cigliano 
were added. This leaves three openings at present. 

The disbursements of the Mass. Art Lottery fund are 
twice a year. The deadlines are: May 1st, with funding in 
July; and November 1st, with funding in January. 

The 1983 Council has recommended to the State 
Council both the May, in the amount of $3,701 and 
November allotment of $6,225 funding. These funds 
were all granted as requested with the State con- 
gratulating the committee for excellent work. 

This council is aiding the Selectmen in the use of the 
Old Town Hall. Guidelines have been written and been 
approved by the Selectmen for activities and job descrip- 
tions of the Council. 

The Council in 1984 hopes to further promote cultural 
activities for the Town of Chelmsford and in the Old 
Town Hall. 

DOG OFFICER 

The following is a report of my services as Dog Officer 
for the year ending December 31, 1983. 



Stray dogs picked up 

Lost dogs returned to owners 

Stray dogs sold as pets 

Stray dogs sent to Lowell Humane 

Calls received 

Calls investigated 

Dead animals picked up 

Miles traveled 

Dogs licensed in 1983 



211 

151 

11 

49 

1,936 

1,242 

361 

21,709 

2,866 



Respectfully submitted, 

Frank Wojtas, Jr. 
Dog Officer 



76 



CABLE COMMISSION 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 



Members 

Richard Ste. Marie 
Norman C. Locke 

John Fisher 
Ford Cavallari 
Walter Kivlan 
Marianne Pareskey 
Gary Francis 
Jacob Sartz 
Patt Moser 



of the Commission 

Chairman 

Vice Chairman and 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Director, Community TV 

(non-voting) 



Walter R. Hedlund, 
Dana Caffelle 
Raymond Day 



Chairman 

James K. Gifford 
Charles Marderosian 



The members of the commission developed plans for 
working in cooperation with other Massachusetts Cable 
Commissions and interested agencies toward seeking 
legislative revision of the subscribers rate due the com- 
munities from cable operators, from 50c per subscriber to 
3% of the cable companies total yearly revenue. 

Commission members also investigated the necessiry 
for the additional surcharges which the cable companies 
had instituted during 1983, and are currently considering 
means by which the surcharges may be lowered or 
eliminated. 

The members also interviewed representatives from 
various town agencies who were interested in informing 
the townspeople of their activities via Channel 43 and dis- 
cussed the most effective ways that they could be ac- 
complished. 

The commission is developing plans by which local 
programming may be supported by local institutions and 
commercial establishments, in a means similar to the way 
non commercial programming is sponsored in public 
broadcasting stations. We expect this to provide a 
revenue base which can be used for providing increased 
quality programming for the people of Chelmsford. 

The members of the commission wish to express their 
appreciation and thanks to the Executive Secretary and 
the Board of Selectmen for all their support through the 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Norman C. Locke 
Vice Chairman and Secretary 



The Celebrations Committee wish to thank once again 
the Chelmsford Lodge of Elks No. 2310 for the funding of 
the 1983 Annual Fourth of July Parade, the Chelmsford 
Minutemen Coordinating Committee funding, planning 
and efforts for the success of the annual Fair on the com- 
mon, the Chelmsford Arts Society for the Arts Festival. 
The committee acknowledges and thanks the efforts of 
tne Police, Fire and Public Works Departments for their 
assistance and cooperation, during the successful long 
Fourth of July weekend, also special thanks for the many 
volunteer hours by the Chelmsford Auxiliary Police 
Department and their Explorers Troop. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 

CIVIL DEFENSE COMMITTEE 

Walter R. Hedlund, Director 



George J. Brown 
Kathryn Brough 
Melvin P. DeJager 
George R. Dixon 
Raymond Day 



William W. Edge 

Walter W. Edwards 

Charles S. Galloway 

Donald Savage 



The Civil Defense Committee, has been meeting the 
2nd. Tuesday of each month, preparing all necessary 
reports and papers for the State and Federal Emergency 
Management Agencies, for matching funding and 
surplus equipment. The Chelmsford Emergency 
Operating Center (E.O.C.) is now in the basement of the 
Town Offices at 50 Billerica Road, is nearing comple- 
tion, with radio communications established with Police, 
Fire and Highway Departments. Various surplus equip- 
ment has been obtained this past year from the Mass. 
Surplus Warehouse in Taunton. 

I wish to thank the Executive Secretary, Board of 
Selectmen and all Department Heads and personnel for 
their cooperation during this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund, 
Director 



77 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John P. Richardson, Chairman 
Martha Sanders, Clerk 

Jane B. Drury 

Dr. D. Lawrence Fadjo 

Joseph V. Kopycinski 

Stephen Stowell 

Member Leaving During The Year 
George Adams Parkhurst 

This year the regular monthly meetings were held on 
the last Monday of the month. Meetings were held at the 
1802 schoolhouse and also, inventory workshop meetings 
were held at 24 Buckman Drive, as posted. 

Through an arrangement with the Massachusetts His- 
torical Commission, the inventory data for historically 
significant buildings and sites of Chelmsford are being 
submitted in draft form in order to expedite completion 
of the town inventory. With such a large amount of 
buildings, a more streamlined system was sorely needed. 
Thirty new inventories have been completed, bringing 
the total to 152. 



when the architectural features involved were deemed to 
have an insubstantial effect on the Historic District and 
after the owners of all adjoining property were notified 
and had expressed no objection. 

There were 13 Certificates of Appropriateness and 2 
Certificates of Non- applicability of Hardship issued by 
the Commission during the year. 

The Commission will continue to make every effort to 
preserve and protect the distinctive characteristics of the 
Historic District by encouraging appropriate features 
that are compatible with the existing settings and archi- 
tecture. 

It is only with the continuing cooperation and support 
of the townspeople of Chelmsford, especially the property 
owners within the District, that an aesthetically sound 
district can be maintained. The Commission extends its 
thanks to all who have contributed during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul J. Canniff, D.M.D. 
Chairman 



The Commission plans to cooperate with the Historic 
District Commission in providing markers on the roads 
entering into the Center Historic District. The marking 
will highlight the district to visitors in town and also they 
will serve as a guide to new residents and businesses mov- 
ing into the area. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John P. Richardson 

HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

MEMBERS 

Paul J. Canniff, D.M.D. , Chairman 
Leon LeMaire, III, Vice Chairman 
John P. Richardson 
Richard O. Lahue, Sr. 
Harold J. Davis 



CHELMSFORD INDUSTRIAL 
DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 



Eugene J. Doody 
L. James Glinos 



Timothy J 



Thomas A 
John L 
Hehir 



St. Germain 
Sullivan, Jr. 



Industrial and Commercial growth continued in 
Chelmsford during 1983. The Industrial Development 
Commission continued to receive and to respond to 
developer inquiries regarding available land and building 
space in the Town of Chelmsford. 

Industrial growth continued in the Mill Road, Turn- 
pike Road and Route 129 areas. Activity also continues in 
the Drum Hill area and in East Chelmsford. The sale of 
the Training School in North Chelmsford to Wang and 
the University of Lowell will also be creating new oppor- 
tunities in North Chelmsford. 



Alternate 

Richard Burkinshaw 

Clerk 

Mary E. Caffelle 

The Historic District Commission met regularly at the 
1802 Schoolhouse on the first Monday of each month. 
Special meetings were scheduled, as required, to accom- 
modate applicants who expressed a need for an earlier 
decision by the Commission on the appropriateness of 
their proposal. 

The Commission accepted 15 applications for a Cer- 
tificate of Appropriateness. There were 5 public hearings 
held. 8 public hearings were waived by the Commission 



This development activity has generated jobs for 
Chelmsford area residents and tax income to the Town of 
Chelmsford. Since 1980 tax income from industrial and 
commercial properties increased over 50% from 
$2,150,000 to $3,265,220 in 1983. Further expansion of 
this tax base is anticipated in 1984 and 1985. 

The Commission is grateful to the Board of Assessors 
for providing the necessary quantitative data for this 
report. 

For the Commission 

Eugene J. Doody, Chairman 



78 



INSECT PEST CONTROL 
DEPARTMENT 

The department has continued with the removal of the 
dead oak and elm trees resulting from the past Gypsy 
Moth infestation as well as the Dutch Elm disease. Each 
year we hope for less removals but as yet we haven't seen 
it. 

With the assistance of the State workers, and equip- 
ment for a week, the department was able to spray a 
minimal amount of poison ivy. I feel the program should 
continue on a limited basis. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Donald P. Gray 

NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL 
HIGH SCHOOL 

DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Robert Manning, Chairman 
Stratos Dukakis, Vice-Chairman 
William Buxton, Secretary 
Jane Barry 
Randolph Brumagim 
Augustine Kish 
Irene Machemer 
Charlotte Scott 
David Snow 
Cecile Stefanski 



ALTERNATES 



Harvey Atkins, Jr. 
Kevin Finnegan 
Edward Mitchell 
L. Peter Noddin 
Jordan Waugh 
Paul Wright 
To be appointed 



Shirley 

Chelmsford 

Pepperell 

Groton 

Chelmsford 

Littleton 

Townsend 

Westford 

Chelmsford 

Westford 



Littleton 

Westford 

Townsend 

Shirley 

Groton 

Pepperell 

Chelmsford 



ADMINISTRATION 

Bernholdt Nystrom Superintendent-Director 

Charles V'alera Assistant Director Principal 

David McLaughlin Technical Coordinator 

Paul Royte Director of Guidance 

Thomas Eng Dean of Students 

For the fourth consecutive year, the Nashoba Valley 
Technical High School District plans to maintain a level 
assessment. This will be accomplished through additional 
state aid, the utilization of federal, state and local reim- 
bursements and the maximization of our investments by 
our Treasurer, Thomas St. Germain. 



Co-op Training Program which allows senior students to 
work in industry during their shop weeks and receive 
valuable training in their chosen fields as well as a salary. 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School is accredited 
by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, 
Inc. and provides its students with on-the-job training, 
saleable skills, co-op program, high school diploma, 
trade certificate and an opportuity for further education 
and job placement. 

The following programs are offered at Nashoba Tech: 

Technical Programs 

Air Conditioning Refrigeration Electronics 

Auto Body Horticulture Landscaping 

Automotive Machine 

Baking Medical Occupations 

Carpentry Metal Fabrication 

Culinary Arts Painting and Decorating 

Data Processing Plumbing and Heating 

Drafting Printing 

Electrical Welding 

Academic Programs 

English Geometry 

Social Studies Triogonometry 

U.S. History Advanced Mathematics 

Consumer Education Biology 

General Mathematics Physics 

Algebra Chemistry 

How to Start Your Own Business 

In addition to the technical and academic programs, a 
full Interscholastic Athletic Program is offered to the 
students. 



Enrollment as of October 1, 1982 



Chelmsford 

Groton 

Littleton 

Pepperell 

Shirley 

Townsend 

Westford 

Tuitioned 

Total 



239 
78 
77 

105 
82 
75 

202 
3 



861 



With more and more students opting for vocational 
training, we feel confident that the school district will be 
able to maintain its full capacity enrollment of 850 
students. Over the past decade, the record of employ- 
ment for our graduates has averaged over 95%. Each 
year qualified seniors may elect to take advantage of our 



79 






NORTHERN MIDDLESEX 
AREA COMMISSION 

The Northern Middlesex Area Commission had its for- 
mal beginnings twenty years ago this year. It was in 
December 1963 that the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts Department of Commerce made its findings that the 
nine communities of the Greater Lowell area form "an ef- 
fective region for planning purposes." The Commission 
counts almost two hundred Selectmen, City Councillors, 
Planning Board Members and alternates who have 
represented the City and Towns over the past two 
decades. The complete list is in the program notes for the 
annual meeting this past September. 

Although the Commission worked without staff and 
budget during the first few years, the record shows that 
the Commission debated many issues of significance to 
the Greater Lowell area, especially in the period of 
economic decline. Some of these remain outstanding to- 
day. A new Merrimack River Bridge, industrial develop- 
ment, solid waste disposal, water quality protection, and 
vocational education were high on the agenda in the early 
years. 

By 1967 the Commission hired staff and projects began 
on sewer and water, land use, highway circulation and a 
regional data base. 

In the early 1970's the Commission increased the level 
of services to the local communities and dedicated a 
greater portion of the budget to local technical 
assistance. 

Legislation was enacted in 1972 which distinguishes the 
Northern Middlesex Area Commission from other 
regional planning commissions in the Commonwealth. A 
Selectman from each town and a City Councillor from 
Lowell were added to the Commission, which, up until 
then, included Planning Board Members and alternates. 
This legislation successfully involved the Commission in 
the full range of community issues. 

Responding to Congressional mandates, the Commis- 
sion became extensively involved in transportation plann- 
ing with the Massachusetts Department of Public Works 
and the Federal Urban Mass Transportation Administra- 
tion. 

Today the Commission serves as the planning arm of 
the Metropolitan Planning Organization consisting of the 
Executive Office of Transportation and Construction, 
Massachusetts Department of Public Works, Lowell 
Regional Transit Authority and Northern Middlesex 
Area Commission. This planning effort has resulted in 
the new bus fleet and capital facilities of the Lowell 
Regional Transit Authority and the definition of the scale 
and location of a new Merrimack River Bridge, the con- 
cept of the auto- restricted zone in downtown Lowell to 
facilitate traffic movement in the region, and numerous 
cooperative local, State and Federal plans and projects, 
such as Billerica Center, Route 129, Air Quality Com- 
pliance, and Route 38. The Commission recently com- 



pleted a nationwide survey for the U.S. Department of 
Transportation on energy considerations essential to 
transportation planning and led a program for carpool- 
ing and vanpooling and subscription bus services among 
the major employers in the greater Lowell and Route 128 
area. Both projects were specially funded by the U.S. 
Department of Transportation. 

Definitive land use and environmental plans for the 
region were embodied in a Wastewater Management 
Plan funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agen- 
cy. These have assisted the many water quality projects 
underway in the region and designs for river protection 
and preservation. 

Over the years, NMAC has helped obtain extensive 
rehabilitation assistance for member communities 
resulting in housing rehabilitation in various town and 
neighborhood centers. Particular attention has been paid 
to the historic values of the region. 

Project review and referrals from other agencies 
developed and evolved, and the Commission in the past 
year processed about $90,000,000 of projects for in- 
dustrial financing and Federal grants and aids. In addi- 
tion, the Commission serves as clearinghouse for State 
and Federal environmental assessments. 

The Commission is well established as a source of 
regional data and information for various interests on 
both the public and private side, and maintains an exten- 
sive data base and planning and governmental affairs 
library, including aerial photographs and grant informa- 
tion. 

In 1984 NMAC's work will include a Route 3 Corridor 
Study, a traffic study in the Route 129 area, the comple- 
tion of the Tyngsborough Master Plan, the beginning of 
the Dracut Land Use/Zoning Plan, more local traffic 
problem assistance, technical assistance to the Lowell 
Regional Transit Authority. The completion of projects 
to develop a Transit Mall at Kearney Square with the 
Lowell Regional Transit Authority, a pedestrian bridge 
from the Market Street Garage to Central Street in 
cooperation with the Lowell Historic Preservation Com- 
mission and the City, and downtown parking awarded to 
NMAC by the Federal Highway Administration in a Na- 
tional competition. 

The Commission will closely monitor feasibility studies 
of alternative water supplies for the Boston Metropolitan 
Areas now being conducted by the Metropolitan District 
Commission. One of the alternatives is the Merrimack 
River above Pawtucket Falls. 

A feasibility study for shared traffic engineering will be 
undertaken with a grant from the State Executive Office 
of Communities and Development. Under contract with 
the Bureau of Solid Waste, NMAC will provide an educa- 
tional program on hazardous waste. 

NMAC will continue to be a central source of data and 
planning information essential to project development 
and review, and for articulation of regional policies for 



80 



balanced physical, social and economic growth in our 
area. 

A list of fifty-six reports published by the Commission 
in 1982 and 1983 accompanies this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Dennis J. Ready, Selectman 

Eugene E. Gilet, Planning Board 

and Treasurer, NMAC 

Norman E. Thidemann, Alternate 



1982 REPORTS 

Prepared by the Northern Middlesex Area Commis- 



Travel Time Study -January, 1982 
Surplus Municipal Report - Developer's Kit - April, 
1982 

Reasonably Available Control Measures - Impact of 
Increased Participation In Shared Ride Modes 
-Middlesex Turnpike - April, 1982 
Long Range Element: Transportation - March, 1982 
Gallagher Transportation Terminal: Development 
and Use Potential - Fall. 1982 

Ridesharing Information Office Evaluation Report 
-Fall, 1982 

Comparison of Commuter Rail and Bus Service 
Operations In Northern Middlesex Area - Fall, 1982 
Energy Contingency Plan - Fall, 1982 
Accident Reduction Strategies in the NMAC Area 
-March, 1982 

Accident Occurrences and Poor Roadway Conditions 
in the Northern Middlesex Area - Working Paper 
-Fall, 1982 

Transportation Systems Management Evaluation 
-February. 1982 

An Assessment of Traffic and Parking Problems in 
the U Lowell and Pawtucketville Neighborhood Area 
- May, 1982 

Fare and Elasticity Report - Fall. 1982 
Transportation Improvement Program Consistency 
Statement - Air Quality • March, 1982 
Linear Roadway Management Study • spring. 1982 
Reasonably Available Controlled Measures - Nashua. 
New Hampshire Park-N Ride Lots - May. 1982 
Tyngsborough Master Plan Interim Report: Over- 
view of Growth and Development Issues - May. 1982 
Unified Work Program - April, 1982 
Reasonably Available Control Measures - Route 3 
Additional Lanes - April, 1982 
Rail Bed Use Identification Study -July. 1982 
Annual Report - May. 1982 

Comprehensive Transportation Plan Update - June, 
1982 

Transportation Element of the State Implementation 
Plan -June, 1982 

Main Street Development Issues - Tewksbury - July, 
1982 

Reasonably Available Control Measures Packaging - 
July, 1982 



• FY '83 Transportation Improvement Program - 
August, 1982 

• Phase I Citizen Survey - Tyngsborough - September, 
1982 

• Elderly & Handicapped Transportation: A Descrip- 
tion of LRTA's Section 504 Special Efforts Program 

- September, 1982 

• Vanpooling For Profits: A Review - October, 1982 

• Analysis of Growth Trends in the NMAC Region - 
October, 1982 

• Traffic Flow Improvements - Andover Street, Paw- 
tucket Boulevard, Lowell and Route 113, Dunstable 

- April, 1982 

• Incorporating Energy Conservation Into the 
Transportation Planning Process - November, 1982 

• Commuter Rail Service in the NMAC Region: Short 
and Long Range Options - December, 1982 

• Population Projection for the Town of Pepperell - 
December, 1982 

• Potential Unsubsidized Special Transit Service Alter- 
natives - December, 1982 

1983 REPORTS 



An Assessment of the Need to Provide Downtown 
Lowell Fringe Parking Facilities - December, 1983 
LRTA Employee Subscription Bus Service - 
Janauary, 1983 

Commuter Bus Service for the Middlesex Turnpike - 
January, 1983 

Tyngsborough Master Plan: Phase I Data Resource 
Inventory - February. 1983 

Study Design - Intersection Signalization - February, 
1983 

Tyngsborough Phase I Final Report - March, 1983 
Study Design Route 3 Corridor Planning Study - 
April. 1983 

Bridge Repair Deferment Study - April, 1983 
Unified Planning Work Program - April, 1983 
Informational Sign System Analysis Working Paper - 
May. 1983 

Vehicle Occupancy and Classification Study - May, 
1983 

Travel Time/Speed and Delay Study - June, 1983 
Signalized Intersection Study -June, 1983 
Main Street - Strategies for Improvement- July, 1983 
Integrating Taxi Service With Public Transportation 
in the NMAC Region - August, 1983 
Proposal for Employer Subsidized Commuter Bus 
Route - August, 1983 

Transportation Improvement Program FY '84 - 
August, 1983 

Route 129 Chelmsford Traffic Study: Phase One - 
October, 1983 

Transit Revenue Optimization - October, 1983 
LRTA Paratransit Improvement Strategies - 
November, 1983 
• Summary Report of Master Plan Committee Discus- 
sions - November, 1983 



81 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

The Personnel Board is composed of three members, 
two of whom are appointed by the Town Moderator. The 
third member of the Board is elected by non-union town 
employees. Current members are Mr. Alan Murphy, 
Chairman, Mr. J. Rene Scutt and Mr. Pennryn Fitts who 
replaced Ms. Linda Robinson. The clerk to the Board is 
Ms. Bernice O'Neil. Mr. Murphy has served as chairman 
since July 1980. Regular meetings of the Board are held 
on the first Monday night of each month at the Town 
Hall. 

The purpose of the Board is to formulate and imple- 
ment policy regarding personnel administrative prac- 
tices, wages, benefits, performance evaluations, job 
descriptions and organization changes. In addition, the 
Board maintains personnel records and approves starting 
salaries and salary increases. 

During 1983, the Board recommended and the town 
meeting approved the first phase of a new salary 
classification plan that will ensure equal pay for equal 
work. The second phase of the new salary classification 
plan plus nine changes to the Personnel Board by-laws 
were prepared for consideration by the 1984 town 
meeting. The by-law changes will provide additional 
benefits to employees under the jurisdiction of the Board 
that are now enjoyed by other town employees. 

During 1984, the Board will work closely with all town 
departments to implement personnel practices in a way 
that is fair and equitable to town employees. The Board 
will also review existing personnel policies and procedures 
so that the town can continue to attract and maintain 
highly skilled and motivated employees. 

RECREATION COMMISSION 
COMMISSION MEMBERS 



Jack Bilodeau 
Joan Murray 
Harry Ayotte 
Robert Charpentier 
Gerald Coutu 
Bruce MacDonald 
Paul Murphy 
David Roberts 
Evelyn Newman 



Chairman 

Vice Chairman 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Part-time Clerk 



The Chelmsford Recreation Commission is composed 
of a maximum of nine members appointed by the Board 
of Selectmen. It is charged with the responsibility of 
developing, administering and supporting programs and 
facilities designed to fill the recreation needs of the 
residents of Chelmsford. 

The major portion of the Commission's activities is, 
and always has been, connected with organized youth ac- 
tivities. A corps of dedicated volunteers runs these pro- 
grams, most of which provide athletic activities for youths 
from six to eighteen years of age. The Commission pro- 



vides very limited funding for these activities; its main 
contribution to their success is as a liaison between the 
organizations and other Town authorities, including the 
School Committee, the Board of Selectmen, the Parks 
Department and the Varney Commission. 

Indeed, the success of these youth activities would not 
be possible without the continued cooperation of these 
community authorities. Their gracious cooperation with 
the Commission and the organizations it supports is 
gratefully appreciated. 

The Recreation Commission Summer Program con- 
tinues to attract several hundred residents at the Physical 
Education Program which is held in the High School 
gymnasium and Weight Training Room, the outside and 
inside Basketball program, tennis lessons at the McCar- 
thy Tennis Courts, playground programs offered at the 
Westlands School and at the Varney Playground, a swim 
and swimming lessons program at Crystal Lake, Cross 
Country and Track and Field at the High School Track, a 
seven-week series of free programs for children on 
Wednesday mornings including Gerwick Puppets, Patch- 
work Theatre productions, Dan Grady Marionettes, 
magic and juggling, Photography for children, the Little 
Red Wagon and Mr. Mysto the Magician all at the Town 
Offices gymnasium, and a series of Concerts on the Com- 
mon by the Chelmsford Community Band. 

Currently, the aim of the Recreation Commission is to 
expand programs to serve the total recreational needs of 
Chelmsford, as well as to continue to sponsor volunteer 
organizations. The Commission welcomes input from 
Chelmsford residents on how it can better meet the com- 
munity's recreational needs. 



SIGN ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

COMMITTEE MEMBERS 

John Harrington 
Jean Rook 
Debbie Dion 
Wells McDonald 
Mitch Korbey 

As Chairman of the Sign Advisory Committee for the 
year ending 1983, I was pleased with the attendance of 
committee members John Harrington, Jean Rook and 
Debbie Dion. Their interest and enthusiasm was sparkl- 
ing. 

Recalling the judgments and decisions that we made 
during this time I noticed that our actual input and at- 
tentiveness were needed only in a few instances. After 
discussions among ourselves and with the Building In- 
spector, Ron Wetmore, our feelings on these few matters 
were later sent to the Board of Appeals for final judg- 
ment. 

It is my feeling that Mr. Wetmore handled all of the 
applications and discrepancies with proper effectiveness. 
Mr. Wetmore has controlled the signs in the Town of 



82 



Chelmsford according to the wishes of the Sign Advisory 
Committee with the utmost care and ease. 

As Chairman, I feel that the Sign Advisory Committee 
has served a meaningful and worthwhile purpose since its 
inception, but that its services are no longer needed to 
make sure of the proper etiquette for signs. I feel that Mr. 
Wetmore can handle all of the sign applications with his 
knowledge of the Town Sign By-Laws. In this way the 
Town of Chelmsford could use the aggressive members of 
this committee for other important services. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Wells W. McDonald 

Chairman 



DEPARTMENT OF 
VETERANS' SERVICES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and the 
residents of the Town of Chelmsford. I am submitting the 
Annual Report from this department, as Veterans' Agent 
and Investigator for the period 31 December 1982 thru 31 
December 1983. 



disabilities, widow's pensions, school assist- 
ance for dependent children, Civil Service 
retirements, life insurance awards, Social 
Security retirements, disabilities and sup- 
plemental income 
Appointments (Power of Attorney) 



212 
340 



As Veterans' Agent, I am a member of the Middlesex 
County Veteran Service Agents Association (serving as 
Vice-President), Merrimack Valley Health Care Social 
Workers Association and American Society of Notaries. 

Veteran Services wishes to thank the Board of Select- 
men, Town Officials, Veteran Organizations, Town Em- 
ployees and Civic Organizations for their kind assistance 
and cooperation during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary K. McAuliffe LSW 
Veterans' Agent 



VETERANS* EMERGENCY FUND 
COMMITTEE 



The effectiveness of Chapter 115 continues to prove 
itself as a praise-worthy effort in alleviating suffering, 
financial anxiety and a valuable sociological framework 
within which to operate. 

The Veterans' Service Department serves as a one-stop 
center for veterans and their dependents, in addition to 
our duties to aid, assist and advise as stated in Chapter 
115 of MGL. This office counsels, files claims, explores 
every avenue of resource and revenue. 

VETERANS' SERVICES/ 
FEDERAL EXPENDITURES 



Recipients aided (ordinary' benefits) 

Medically aided 

Fuel assistance 

Investigations 

Services to others under the Code of Human 
Services 

Disability Compensation and Widow's Pension 
applications 

Screening and Assistance-Social Security 
Disability, Social Security Supplemental In 
come for the Aged, Blind or Disabled 

Hospitalization-Out patient aid and assistance 

Veterans Administration and State Hospital 
Medical and Psychiatric admissions 

Counselling for V.A. pension, medicaid, 
medicare, champus. medical insurance, 
geriatrics and V.A. questionnaire filing 

Bonus application filing assistance 

School Application assistance-college, depen- 
dent children, Vocational schools and Voca- 
tion rehabilitation 

Application assistance-on-the-job training 

V.A. service and non-service connected 



302 
86 

245 

713 

410 
98 



66 
294 

28 



326 
29 



208 
9 



The Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee received 
no applications for assistance during 1983. This may be 
due to a general improvement in the national and par- 
ticularly the local economy. 

When an application is received, usually through the 
office of the Veteran's Agent of the Town, the committee 
studies each aspect of the veteran's request very carefully. 

If the application for assistance is approved, and in 
most cases this does occur, aid is always granted in the 
form of matci ial grants, such as payment of medical bills, 
Utility bills, rental assistance, and no cash payments to 
the applicant are authorized. 

The fund was established by Town Meeting Vote in 
1947 and during the intervening years a number of 
veterans of World War II have been helped. The fund is 
administered by veterans of World War II who are ap- 
pointed annually by the Board of Selectmen. 

Our assets consist of two bank accounts; one a regular 
passbook savings account for easy access for emergency 
cases. A second account is presently in the form of a 
Term Deposit Certificate earning at the rate of 10.2%, 
and where interest additions are compounded and added 
to the principal. During 1983 S670.04 was added to tin- 
two accounts. The total value of the fund's assets are 
reflected in the Treasurer's Report, printed elsewhere in 
i he Annual Town Report. 

One new member, Charles McEnnis, was appointed 
during 1983 as the representative from Precinct 9, to 
replace Peter Saulis. who was a member of the committee 
for a number of years, and because of reason of health, 
has retired. 



83 



We list the names of present committee members in the 
event future applicants may wish to submit requests for 
information or applications for assistance: 

Precinct 1: Precinct 7: 

Robert E. Donaldson Carl J. Lebedzinski 

Precinct 2: Precinct 8: 

Russell S. Butterfield Herbert T. Knutson 

Precinct 3: Precinct 9: 

James J. Walker Charles McEnnis 

Precinct 4: Precinct 10: 

John J. McNulty Melvin P. dejager 

Precinct 5: Precinct 11: 

George F. Waite Harold C. Giffin 

Precinct 6: Precinct 12: 

Alfred H. Coburn Robert T. Clough 

The Committee wishes to extend its appreciation to 
various other town officials who have assisted during the 
past year. 

Respectfully yours, 

Veteran's Emergency Fund Committee 
of the Town of Chelmsford 

Alfred H. Coburn, Chairman 

VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 

January 1st, 1983 through December 31, 1983 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

Balance on Hand as of January 1 , 1983 $9,036.45 

Add Receipts: 

The Central Savings Bank, Lowell, 

Mass. Interest 339.04 

The Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank, 
Lowell, Mass. 
Interest: 331.00 

Total Interest: 670.04 

Total Balance on Hand as of January 1, 1983 

and Receipts: 9,706.49 

Deduct Disbursements: None 

Balance on Hand as of December 31, 1983: 9,706.49 

ASSETS 

Central Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. Acct. #128790 $6,337.50 

Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

Term Deposit Certificate, Acct. #440007431 3,368.99 

$9,706.49 

LIABILITIES 

Total Liabilities: $ None 

Total Assets, Less Liabilities: $9,706.49 



Respectfully yours, 

Town of Chelmsford 
Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 

Alfred H. Coburn, Treasurer 



INDEX 

Page 

Application for Appointments to Town Committees 85 

Appointed Town Officials -. 61 

Board of Appeals 73 

Board of Assessors 38 

Board of Registrars 43 

Board of Selectmen 4 

Cable TV Commission 76 

Cemetery Commission 38 

Civil Defense Commission 76 

Council on Aging 74 

Cultural Council 75 

Department of Veteran's Services 82 

Dog Officer 75 

Elected Town Officials 3 

Fire Department 67 

General Information 2 

Health Department 39 

Highway Department 69 

Historical Commission 77 

Historic District Commission 77 

Housing Authority 40 

Industrial Development Commission 77 

Insect Pest Control 78 

Inspector of Animals 73 

Inspector of Buildings 67 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 78 

Northern Middlesex Area Commission 79 

Park Department 41 

Personnel Board 81 

Planning Board 41 

Police Department 71 

Police — Auxiliary 72 

Public Libraries 42 

Recreation Commission 81 

School Committee 44 

Sewer Commission 59 

Sign Advisory Committee 81 

Town Accountant 62 

Town Celebrations 76 

Town Clerk 5 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting February 10. 1983 6 

Special Town Meeting February 10, 1983 7 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting April 2, 1983 and April 25, 1983 7 

Town Election Results 15 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting May 16, 1983 17 

Annual Town Meeting April 25, 1983 18 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 9. 1983 20 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 16, 1983 28 

Special Town Meeting May 16. 1983 ' 29 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 23. 1983 32 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting December 12, 1983 34 

Special Town Meeting December 12. 1983 36 

Town Directory Back Cover 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 60 

Tree Department 60 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 82 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

TOWN OFFICES 

50 BILLERICA ROAD 

CHELMSFORD, MASS. 01824-2777 

CITIZENS ACTIVITY RECORD 

"GOOD GOVERNMENT STARTS WITH YOU" 

If you are interested in serving on an appointed town committee, please 
fill our this form and mail to: Executive Secretary, Board of Selectmen, 
Town Offices, 50 Billerica Road, Chelmsford, MA 01824. The filling out 
of this form in no way assures appointment. All committee vacancies will 
be filled by citizens deemed most qualified to serve in a particular capacity. 



NAME HOME PHONE BUSINESS PHONE. 

ADDRESS AMOUNT OF TIME AVAILABLE 

INTEREST IN WHAT TOWN COMMITTEES 



PRESENT BUSINESS AFFILIATION AND WORK. 



BUSINESS EXPERIENCE. 



EDUCATION OR SPECIAL TRAINING. 



DATE APPOINTED TOWN OFFICES HELD TERM EXPIRED 



REMARKS. 



TOWN DIRECTORY 



Accounting: 256-3621 
Assessors: 256-2031 
Board of Appeals Clerk: 256-7164 
Building Inspector: 256-8346 

(Yard Sales, Kennel Permits & Bldg. Permits) 
Cemetery Garage: 256-8671 
Community Teamwork: 459-0551 
Conservation Commission: 256-7164 
Council on Aging: 256-0013 

Dog Officer: 256 -3549 (Police Station: 256-0754) 
Fire Department: 256-2543 
Gas Inspector: 256-8347 
Health Department: 256-2061 
Highway Department: 256-2161 

Garage: 251-4841 
High School, Richardson Rd.: 251-8792 
Housing Authority, Wilson St.: 256-7425 
Housing for the Elderly, Wilson St.: 256-7425 
Libraries: Adams- 256-5521 ; McKay- 251-3212 
Massachusetts Electric Co.: 459-1431 
Park Department Garage: 256-5073 
Planning Board Clerk: 256-6491 
Plumbing Inspector: 453-2746 
Police Department: 256-2521 
Post Office (Center): 256-2361 
Recreation Comm: 256-2441 
Registry of Deeds: 458-8474 
Registry of Motor Vehicles: 459-9397 
School Dept.. 75 Graniteville Rd. 251-4981 
Selectmen: 256-2441 
Town Aide: 256-0013 
Town Clerk: 256-4104 
Treasurer/Tax Collector: 256-2122 
Veterans' Agent: 256-8713 
Water Department (Center): 256-2381 
Welcome Wagon: 256-0847 



Welfare: 454-8061. 33 Middle St. Lowell 

Wiring Inspector: 256-8347 

24-hr. Juror Hot Line (Toll Free) 800-792-5117 

POLL LOCATIONS FOR ELECTIONS: 

Precinct 1: Town Offices, 50 Billerica Rd. 

Precinct 2: North Congregational Church, Shaw Street 

Precinct 3: Parker School, Graniteville Rd. 

Precinct 4: East School, Carlisle St. 

Precinct 5: Byam School, Maple Rd. 

Precinct 6: Westlands School, Dalton Rd. 

Precinct 7: North Congregational Church. Shaw Street 

Precinct 8: Small Gymnasium, McCarthy 

Junior High School 
Precinct 9: South. Row School, Boston Rd. 
Precinct 10: South Row School, Boston Rd. 
Precinct 11: Westlands School, Dalton Rd. 
Precinct 12: Small Gymnasium. McCarthy 

Junior High School 
Senators Edward Kennedy & Paul Tsongas 
JFK Federal Building, Government Center, 
Boston, MA 02203 

Russell Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 
Senator Kennedy: 202-224-4543 
Senator Tsongas: 202-224-2742 

Rep. Bruce Freeman: Room 146, State House, Boston, 
MA 02133 727-2560 (Office) 
Home: 7 Kenwood St., Chelmsford, 256-2944 
Senator Carol Amick: Room 416A, State House, 
Boston, MA 02133 722-1571 (Office) 
Home: 18 Crescent Rd., Bedford, 275-2644 
Congressman James M. Shannon: 459-0101 
352 Merrimack Street, Lowell 
226 Cannon Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 
202-225-3411 

Middlesex County Commissioners: 494-4100 
Superior Courthouse, E. Cambridge, MA 02141